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When I see an object, its givenness is always somewhat “empty” and indeterminate: not all of it is in plain view like the front side, and even what is in plain view is not given in complete detail. However, it is always part of my visual experience of the object that I am implicitly or explicitly aware of ways in which I could bring further aspects of it into plain view, and avail myself of further aspects and details. This more or less tacit awareness is the horizonality of visual experience. Husserl distinguishes inner and outer horizons of the perceptual object, the former being the anticipated perspectival changes of the object relative to the perceiver, the latter, its anticipated ways of interacting with other objects. The notion of horizonality can be extrapolated from the case of visual experience, to discuss other, relevantly analogous kinds of experiences. Husserl uses the notion broadly, for various levels and kinds of experience. 

Key works Welton 2003 offers a kind of Heideggerian reading of Husserlian phenomenology, according to which Husserl’s main contribution consists in the characterization of the world, viz., as a horizon, a background of sense, correlative with our ways of engaging with our environments. Walton 2003 examines the various senses of horizonedness in Husserl and Gurwitsch, centering on the Husserlian notion of “latency” as the origin of horizonedness, the functioning of the world-horizon, and the interrelatedness of horizons, forming a cumulative totality. Based mainly on Husserl’s late manuscripts on time consciousness, Walton 2010 gives an account how, in the stratified build-up of objects and the world, “horizonality appears as an undifferentiated totality, a relief of noticeability, an articulated background, and an ontological style.” Held 1998
Introductions Zahavi 2003, Ch. 3, Smith 2006, Ch. 6
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  1. Michael D. Barber (2008). Holism and Horizon: Husserl and McDowell on Non-Conceptual Content. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 24 (2):79-97.
    John McDowell rejects the idea that non-conceptual content can rationally justify empirical claims—a task for which it is ill-fitted by its non-conceptual nature. This paper considers three possible objections to his views: he cannot distinguish empty conception from the perceptual experience of an object; perceptual discrimination outstrips the capacity of concepts to keep pace; and experience of the empirical world is more extensive than the conceptual focusing within it. While endorsing McDowell’s rejection of what he means by non-conceptual content, and (...)
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  2. Pilar Fernández Beites (1993). Evidencia y verdad. Unproblema en la fenomenología de E. Husserl. Logos: Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica 27:195-216.
    This paper reflects on how the possibility of meaningful evidence is to be assumed in view that all our linguistic exercises take place in the context of a discursive horizon where we are situated. To do this, the paper starts distinguishing two phenomena: first, the possibility of meaningful evidence and second, the horizontal character that is inherent to the deployment of linguistic meaning. Furthermore, through a discussion with Husserl and Wittgenstein, the paper considers how those two phenomena are to be (...)
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  3. John J. Drummond (1984). D.W. Smith and R. Mclntyre: 'Husserl and Intentionality: A Study of Mind, Meaning, and Language'. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 1 (1).
    This book seems to us potentially as important as any work that has appeared in the last few decades for the purpose of understanding Hussefl's thought in its relation to other recent philosophical traditions, especially certain aspects of the analytical tradition. Yet there is a distinct danger that it will not receive the attention it amply merits. One reason for this danger is the unfortunate tendency we all have of dismissing ideas by pidgeonholing them.
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  4. Denis Fisette (1998). The Horizon of the Self: Husserl on Indexicals. In. In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Self-Awareness, Temporality, and Alterity. Dordrecht: Kluwer. 119--135.
    One of the questions raised by the conference’s topic, in particular the relationship between the self and the other, a matter much discussed since Merleau-Ponty’s death, is the question of husserlian phenomenology’s cartesianism. Some believe that despite his reservations towards cartesianism, Husserl never disavowed his commitment to the Cartesian program of a first philosophy.
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  5. Fausto Fraisopi (2010). Questions de co-intentionnalité : Expérience et structure d?horizon. Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique (8: Questions d'intentionnalité ).
    Le dedans intentionnel (das intentionnale Innen) est en même temps le dehors (Aussen). (E. Husserl, Intentionnalité et être-au-monde, Hua. XV, p. 549-556 (§ 8), tr. fr. in D. Janicaud (éd.), L?intentionnalité en question entre phénoménologie et recherches cognitives, Paris, Vrin, p. 145.) En introduisant l?enracinement de l?expérience (et surtout de la logique) dans « le sol universel du monde », Husserl affirme, de façon très claire, dans Expérience et jugement , que « toute saisie d?objet singulier et toute activité ultérieure (...)
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  6. Fausto Fraisopi (2009). Expérience et horizon chez Husserl. Studia Phaenomenologica 9:455-475.
    The work on the sixth Logical Investigation presents, to Husserl and moreover to transcendental phenomenology a new set of problems, questions and theoretical issues, which are deeply related to the concept of intuitive fulfilment. Here, the relation between core and halo, developed in 1908, must be integrated with the concept of horizon as a fundamental stucture of perception and every other kind of experience. The experience also became a contextual experience, essentially related and determined from a contextual situationality. More generally, (...)
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  7. Alain Gallerand (2013). Indexicalité Et Horizon Chez Husserl. Dialogue 52 (1):129-163.
    Because the meaning of indexical expressions fluctuates, they have long been enigmatic for the theory of signification in phenomenology. In Husserlsymbolicintentional horizonproper concept” provide answers. Without the new phenomenological value of the theory of concept and intentionality, it is impossible to understand the linguistic operation of indexicality.
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  8. Ian Gerrie (2006). Knowledge on the Horizon: A Phenomenological Inquiry Into the “Framing” of Rodney King. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (3):295 - 315.
    Using the 1991 police beating of Rodney King as case study, this paper draws on Husserlian phenomenology to establish a coherentist account of knowledge as situated with respect to its concrete circumstances of production (e.g., social, cultural, historical, political). I take as my point of departure Gail Weiss's phenomenological investigation into the jury's assessment of evidence in the "Rodney King incident," and in particular, her interest in Husserl's conception of the "horizon" as a structure of consciousness that mediates what is (...)
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  9. Klaus Held (1998). Horizont und Gewohnheit. Husserls Wissenschaft von der Lebenswelt. In Krise der Wissenschaften--Wissenschaft der Krisis? Im Gedenken an Husserls Krisis-Abhandlung (1935/1936-1996).
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  10. S. Stephen Hilmy (1981). The Scope of Husserl's Notion of Horizon. The Modern Schoolman 59 (1):21-48.
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  11. S. Stephen Hilmy (1981). The Scope of Husserl's Notion of Horizon. The Modern Schoolman 59 (1):21-48.
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  12. Adam Konopka (2010). The Worldhood of the Perceptual Environing World. In Pol Vandevelde & Sebastian Luft (eds.), Epistemology, Archaeology, Ethics: Current Investigations of Husserl's Corpus. Continuum.
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  13. Kristjan Laasik (forthcoming). Constitutive Strata and the Dorsal Stream. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-17.
    In his paper, “The Dorsal Stream and the Visual Horizon,” Michael Madary argues that “dorsal stream processing plays a main role in the spatiotemporal limits of visual perception, in what Husserl identified as the visual horizon” (Madary 2011, p. 424). Madary regards himself as thereby providing a theoretical framework “sensitive to basic Husserlian phenomenology” (Madary 2011). In particular, Madary draws connections between perceptual anticipations and the experience of the indeterminate spatial margins, on the one hand, and the Husserlian spatiotemporal visual (...)
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  14. Michael Madary (2011). The Dorsal Stream and the Visual Horizon. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):423-438.
    Today many philosophers of mind accept that the two cortical streams of visual processing in humans can be distinguished in terms of conscious experience. The ventral stream is thought to produce representations that may become conscious, and the dorsal stream is thought to handle unconscious vision for action. Despite a vast literature on the topic of the two streams, there is currently no account of the way in which the relevant empirical evidence could fit with basic Husserlian phenomenology of vision. (...)
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  15. H. Pietersma (1979). Husserl and Heidegger. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 40 (2):194-211.
    Husserl speaks of horizons, Heidegger of worlds. The concept behind these terms is the same; the two philosophers mentioned held generally widely divergent views. In this article I articulate the shared concept and then proceed to argue that the differences of view can be reduced to a difference in the range accorded to the concept. This strategy brings about a great simplification in the generally muddled controversy about the two philosophers. It also has the additional advantage of showing the interest (...)
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  16. Henry Pietersma (2002). Donn Welton, The Other Husserl: The Horizons of Transcendental Phenomenology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (5):381-383.
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  17. Henry Pietersma (1973). Intuition and Horizon in the Philosophy of Husserl. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (1):95-101.
    The notion of "seeing the object itself," basic in husserl's theory of knowledge, Can only make sense, If we interpret it with the help of his notion of horizon or implicit context. Seeing the object itself is an achievement experienced as such. This must mean that the subject has an implicit awareness of a context of other possible epistemic situations in which what is now "seen" or viewed "close up" can be referred to from a "distance." "distance" is here of (...)
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  18. Luis Román Rabanaque (forthcoming). Saulius Geniusas: The Origins of the Horizon in Husserl's Phenomenology. Husserl Studies:1-8.
    Saulius Geniusas’ work on the origins of the horizon is arguably the first book that specifically addresses this fundamental, yet frequently neglected, issue in Husserl’s phenomenology. It attempts to fill this gap in philosophical inquiry by highlighting the elementary fact of the irreducible horizonal givenness of both world and subjectivity, and he does so by taking as a clue the question of the horizon’s origins. The horizon’s unique feature consists in being a ‘‘peculiar figure of intentionality’’ whose problematic ‘‘unfolds as (...)
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  19. J. Scanlon (2002). Welton, D. The Other Husserl: The Horizons of Transcedental Phenomenology. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 33 (1):131-138.
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  20. David Vessey (2009). Gadamer and the Fusion of Horizons. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (4):531 – 542.
    Hans-Georg Gadamer is often criticized for his account of the fusions of horizons as the ideal resolution of dialogue. I argue that in fact it is an excellent account of the successful resolution of dialogue, but only in light of a proper understanding of what Gadamer means by 'horizon' and how then horizons are fused. I do this by showing how Gadamer is drawing on the technical sense of 'horizon' found in Edmund Husserl's and Martin Heidegger's phenomenologies. In the process (...)
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  21. Roberto Walton (2010). The Constitutive and Reconstructive Building-Up of Horizons. In Pol Vandevelde & Sebastian Luft (eds.), Epistemology, Archaeology, Ethics: Current Investigations of Husserl's Corpus. Continuum.
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  22. Roberto J. Walton (2012). El "viraje" en los "beiträge" de M. Heidegger y en los manuscritos C de E. Husserl. Investigaciones Fenomenológicas 9:89-115.
    El artículo considera en primer lugar el papel asignado por Heidegger, en su análisis del viraje (Kehre), al acontecimiento-apropiación (Ereignis) como el punto medio entre el ser y el Dasein. En el carácter abismal de la oscilación entre el llamado del primero y la pertenencia del segundo reside la unidad originaria del tiempo-espacio que deja emerger ambos momentos hacia su separación. Esto permite a su vez el despliegue de un tiempo derivado y un orden para la medición. En segundo lugar, (...)
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  23. Roberto J. Walton (2012). Levels and Figures in Phenomenological Analysis. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (2):285-294.
    Along with a static and genetic egological inquiry, Husserl offers a nonegological analysis that advances through different levels or stages of history. Basic phenomenological themes—subjectivity, temporality, intersubjectivity, and worldliness—appear in varying figures with the progressive bringing-into-play of levels that concern conditions of possibility, actual development, and rational goals. In addition, post-Husserlian phenomenology discloses a surplus that brings us to a level outside the reach of history. This scheme confronts us both with the enduring issue of the stratification of reality and (...)
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  24. Roberto J. Walton (2003). On the Manifold Senses of Horizonedness. The Theories of E. Husserl and A. Gurwitsch. Husserl Studies 19 (1):1-24.
    The article deals with the lines along which manifold senses of horizonedness emerge and their reference to potentiality as a starting-point. The first section examines Gurwitsch's analyses of field-potentialities and margin-potentialities in the light of distinctions drawn by Husserl in terms of latency and patency. It is contended that Husserl's concept of latency encompasses both modes of potentiality. The second section shows how the world-horizon functions as a background-horizon and alternation-horizon conceived of as the two fundamental modes (...)
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  25. Roberto J. Walton (1997). World-Experience, World-Representation, and the World as an Idea. Husserl Studies 14 (1):1-20.
    Husserl proceeds to show how a world-representation emerges from our world-experience, and how an idea of the world plays a role in the expansion of world-representations. He also draws our attention to the appropriation of other world-representations in a process of adjustment and compensation leading to intersubjective world-representations, and offers an analysis of the status of world-representations within transcendental phenomenology. In this article I will underline the relevance of Husserl’s concept of horizonedness to the characterization of the three levels of (...)
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  26. Donn Welton (2003). World as Horizon. In The New Husserl. A Critical Reader.
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  27. Donn Welton (2001). The Other Husserl: The Horizons of Transcendental Phenomenology. Indiana University Press.
    In this thorough study of the full body of his writings, Donn Welton uncovers a Husserl very different from the established view. Arguing against established interpretations, The Other Husserl traces Husserl’s move from static to genetic phenomenology and uses accounts of perception, discourse, subjectivity, and world to elaborate the scope of his systematic phenomenology.
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