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  1. P. Sven Arvidson (2013). Restructuring Attentionality and Intentionality. Human Studies 36 (2):199-216.
    Phenomenology and experimental psychology have been largely interested in the same thing when it comes to attention. By building on the work of Aron Gurwitsch, especially his ideas of attention and restructuration, this paper attempts to articulate common ground in psychology and phenomenology of attention through discussion of a new way to think about multistability in some phenomena. What psychology views as an attentionality-intentionality phenomenon, phenomenology views as an intentionality-attentionality phenomenon. The proposal is that an awareness of this restructuring of (...)
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  2. Jean-Michel Azorin & Jean Naudin (1997). Commentary on "Edmund Husserl's Influence on Karl Jaspers's Phenomenology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (1):37-39.
  3. Timothy J. Bayne (2004). Closing the Gap: Some Questions for Neurophenomenology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (4):349-64.
    In his 1996 paper Neurophenomenology: A methodological remedy for the hard problem, Francisco Varela called for a union of Husserlian phenomenology and cognitive science. Varela''s call hasn''t gone unanswered, and recent years have seen the development of a small but growing literature intent on exploring the interface between phenomenology and cognitive science. But despite these developments, there is still some obscurity about what exactly neurophenomenology is. What are neurophenomenologists trying to do, and how are they trying to do it? To (...)
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  4. M. Beaton, B. Pierce & S. A. J. Stuart (2013). Neurophenomenology – A Special Issue. Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):265-268.
    Context: Seventeen years ago Francisco Varela introduced neurophenomenology. He proposed the integration of phenomenological approaches to first-person experience – in the tradition of Husserl, Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty – with a neuro-dynamical, scientific approach to the study of the situated brain and body. Problem: It is time for a re-appraisal of this field. Has neurophenomenology already contributed to the sciences of the mind? If so, how? How should it best do so in future? Additionally, can neurophenomenology really help to resolve or (...)
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  5. Anthony F. Beavers (2009). The Phenomenological Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science. Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):533-537.
    The Phenomenological Mind, by Shaun Gallagher and Dan Zahavi, is part of a recent initiative to show that phenomenology, classically conceived as the tradition inaugurated by Edmund Husserl and not as mere introspection, contributes something important to cognitive science. (For other examples, see “References” below.) Phenomenology, of course, has been a part of cognitive science for a long time. It implicitly informs the works of Andy Clark (e.g. 1997) and John Haugeland (e.g. 1998), and Hubert Dreyfus explicitly uses it (e.g. (...)
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  6. Anthony F. Beavers (2002). Phenomenology and Artificial Intelligence. Metaphilosophy 33 (1-2):70-82.
    In CyberPhilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing, edited by James H. Moor and Terrell Ward Bynum (Oxford, UK: Blackwell, 2002), 66-77. Also in Metaphilosophy 33.1/2 (2002): 70-82.
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  7. Matt Bower (2014). Developing Open Intersubjectivity: On the Interpersonal Shaping of Experience. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-20.
    The aim of this paper is to motivate the need for and then present the outline of an alternative explanation of what Dan Zahavi has dubbed “open intersubjectivity,” which captures the basic interpersonal character of perceptual experience as such. This is a notion whose roots lay in Husserl’s phenomenology. Accordingly, the paper begins by situating the notion of open intersubjectivity – as well as the broader idea of constituting intersubjectivity to which it belongs – within Husserl’s phenomenology as an approach (...)
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  8. Charles S. Brown (1990). Husserl, Intentionality, and Cognitive Architecture. Southwest Philosophy Review 6 (1):65-72.
  9. Steven Ravett Brown (2004). Structural Phenomenology: An Empirically-Based Model of Consciousness. Dissertation, University of Oregon
    In this dissertation I develop a structural model of phenomenal consciousness that integrates contemporary experimental and theoretical work in philosophy and cognitive science. I argue that phenomenology must be “naturalized” and that it should be acknowledged as a major component of empirical research. I use this model to describe important phenomenal structures, and I then employ it to provide a detailed explication of tip-of-tongue phenomena. The primary aim of “structural phenomenology” is the creation of a general framework within which descriptions (...)
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  10. Ronald Bruzina (2004). Phenomenology and Cognitive Science, Moving Beyond the Paradigms. Husserl Studies 20 (1):43-88.
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  11. Peer F. Bundgaard (2004). The Ideal Scaffolding of Language: Husser's Fourth Logical Investigation in the Light of Cognitive Linguistics. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):49-80.
    One of the central issues in linguistics is whether or not language should be considered a self-contained, autonomous formal system, essentially reducible to the syntactic algorithms of meaning construction (as Chomskyan grammar would have it), or a holistic-functional system serving the means of expressing pre-organized intentional contents and thus accessible with respect to features and structures pertaining to other cognitive subsystems or to human experience as such (as Cognitive Linguistics would have it). The latter claim depends critically on the existence (...)
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  12. Hermann G. W. Burchard (2014). The Cognitive Gap, Neural Darwinism & Linguistic Dualism —Russell, Husserl, Heidegger & Quine. Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):244-264.
    Guided by key insights of the four great philosophers mentioned in the title, here, in review of and expanding on our earlier work (Burchard, 2005, 2011), we present an exposition of the role played by language, & in the broader sense, λογοζ, the Logos, in how the CNS, the brain, is running the human being. Evolution by neural Darwinism has been forcing the linguistic nature of mind, enabling it to overcome & exploit the cognitive gap between an animal and its (...)
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  13. Carmelo Calì (2005). Husserl and the Phenomenological Description of Imagery: Some Issues for the Cognitive Sciences? ARHE 2 (4):25-37.
    This paper deals with two theories Husserl worked out on imagery in order to see if the properties a phenomenological description ascribes to imagery are fit to give meaningful constraints upon theoretical models that guide empirical research. Husserlian descriptions and Kosslyn and colleagues models are hence compared as to their explanatory strategy and implications.
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  14. N. N. Chokr (1992). Mind, Consciousness, and Cognition: Phenomenology Vs Cognitive Science. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 9 (3):179-97.
  15. N. N. Chokr (1992). Mind, Consciousness, and Cognition: Phenomenology Vs. Cognitive Science. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 9 (3):179-197.
  16. Vincenzo Costa (2008). Die Erfahrung Des Anderen. Phänomenologie, Behaviorismus Und Spiegelneuronen. Husserl Studies 24 (3):231-241.
    The recent discovery of a mirror neuron system sets a challenge for a philosophy of experience such as phenomenology, because in humans and monkeys the mirror system seems to transform seen actions into an inner representation of these actions. This paper tries to outline the guidelines of a transcendental-phenomenological analysis of alterity, different from empirical research. The transcendental research must provide a criterion for interpreting the results of empirical science. On this basis the paper compares the phenomenological analysis of alterity (...)
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  17. Larry Davidson (2002). Intentionality, Identity, and Delusions of Control in Schizophrenia: A Husserlian Perspective. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 33 (1):39-58.
  18. Helena de Preester (2008). From Ego to Alter Ego : Husserl, Merleau-Ponty and a Layered Approach to Intersubjectivity. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):133-142.
    This article presents two different phenomenological paths leading from ego to alter ego: a Husserlian and a Merleau-Pontian way of thinking. These two phenomenological paths serve to disentangle the conceptual–philosophical underpinning of the mirror neurons system hypothesis, in which both ways of thinking are entwined. A Merleau-Pontian re-reading of the mirror neurons system theory is proposed, in which the characteristics of mirror neurons are effectively used in the explanation of action understanding and imitation. This proposal uncovers the remaining necessary presupposition (...)
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  19. Natalie Depraz (2012). Empathy and Second-Person Methodology. Continental Philosophy Review 45 (3):447-459.
    How the phenomenology of empathy in Husserl and beyond and the second-person approach of cognition are able to mutually enrich and constrain each other? Whereas the intersubjective empathy is limited to face-to-face inter-individual relational experiences or, when socially embedded, results a non-individualized understanding of others in general, the second person approach of cognition opens the way for a plural relational yet individualized understanding of the other. I would like to show in this paper how the integration of both phenomenological and (...)
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  20. Hl Dreyfus (1991). L'épiphénoménologie de Husserl in Phénoménologie Et Psychologie Cognitive. Les Etudes Philosophiques 1:57-77.
  21. Shaun Gallagher (1997). Mutual Enlightenment: Recent Phenomenology in Cognitive Science. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (3):195-214.
    The term phenomenology can be used in a generic sense to cover a variety of areas related to the problem of consciousness. In this sense it is a title that ranges over issues pertaining to first-person or subjective experience, qualia, and what has become known as "the hard problem" (Chalmers 1995). The term is sometimes used even more generally to signify a variety of approaches to studying such issues, including contemplative, meditative, and mystical studies, and transpersonal psychology.(1) Within the disciplines (...)
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  22. Shaun Gallagher & Dan Zahavi (2008). Précis: The Phenomenological Mind. Abstracta 4 (3):4-9.
    It is difficult to give a nice succinct précis of The Phenomenological Mind since it is composed of a set of chapters each of which addresses a different topic. The topics are linked in numerous ways. There is one way, however, in which all of the chapters are bound together to constitute a unified whole, and this might be considered something like a framework proposition. Phenomenology, understood as the philosophical approach taken up by Husserl and a number of people who (...)
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  23. Barbro Giorgi (2005). Reflections on Therapeutic Practice Guided by a Husserlian Perspective. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 36 (2):141-194.
  24. Rick Grush (2006). How to, and How Not to, Bridge Computational Cognitive Neuroscience and Husserlian Phenomenology of Time Consciousness. Synthese 153 (3):417-450.
    A number of recent attempts to bridge Husserlian phenomenology of time consciousness and contemporary tools and results from cognitive science or computational neuroscience are described and critiqued. An alternate proposal is outlined that lacks the weaknesses of existing accounts.
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  25. Peter Hadreas (2010). Husserlian Self-Awareness and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):43-51.
    The goal of the paper is to offer a model of self-awareness that fits the testimony of both good and bad responders to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), of which fluoxetine (Prozac; Lilly, Indianapolis, IN) is probably the most well known. After a review of troubling current uncertainties concerning how and for whom SSRIs are therapeutic, it is argued that SSRIs, as a rule, lessen the emotionality of SSRI subjects in favor of an increased cognitive and volitional orientation. Traditional empiricist (...)
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  26. Peter Hadreas (2010). In Defense of My Reading of Husserl and a Final Note. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):61-64.
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  27. Charles W. Harvey (1990). Reflections on Charles S. Brown's “Husserl, Intentionality, and Cognitive Architecture”. Southwest Philosophy Review 6 (2):119-122.
  28. Julia Jansen (2005). On the Development of Husserl's Transcendental Phenomenology of Imagination and its Use for Interdisciplinary Research. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):121-132.
    In this paper I trace Husserl’s transformation of his notion of phantasy from its strong leanings towards empiricism into a transcendental phenomenology of imagination. Rejecting the view that this account is only more incompatible with contemporary neuroscientific research, I instead claim that the transcendental suspension of naturalistic (or scientific) pretensions precisely enables cooperation between the two distinct realms of phenomenology and science. In particular, a transcendental account of phantasy can disclose the specific accomplishments of imagination without prematurely deciding upon a (...)
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  29. Howard Damian Kelly (2013). Being and Time, §15: Around-for References and the Content of Mundane Concern. Dissertation, The University of Manchester
    This thesis articulates a novel interpretation of Heidegger’s explication of the being (Seins) of gear (Zeugs) in §15 of his masterwork Being and Time (1927/2006) and develops and applies the position attributed to Heidegger to explain three phenomena of unreflective action discussed in recent literature and articulate a partial Heideggerian ecological metaphysics. Since §15 of BT explicates the being of gear, Part 1 expounds Heidegger’s concept of the ‘being’ (Seins) of beings (Seienden) and two issues raised in the ‘preliminary methodological (...)
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  30. Kristjan Laasik (2014). Constitutive Strata and the Dorsal Stream. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):419-435.
    In his paper, “The Dorsal Stream and the Visual Horizon,” Michael Madary argues that “dorsal stream processing plays a main role in the spatiotemporal limits of visual perception, in what Husserl identified as the visual horizon” (Madary 2011, p. 424). Madary regards himself as thereby providing a theoretical framework “sensitive to basic Husserlian phenomenology” (Madary 2011). In particular, Madary draws connections between perceptual anticipations and the experience of the indeterminate spatial margins, on the one hand, and the Husserlian spatiotemporal visual (...)
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  31. Stephen Langfur (2013). The You-I Event: On the Genesis of Self-Awareness. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):769-790.
    I present empirical evidence suggesting that an infant first becomes aware of herself as the focal center of a caregiver's attending. Yet that does not account for her awareness of herself as agent. To address this question, I bring in research on neonatal imitation, as well as studies demonstrating the existence of a neural system in which parts of the same brain areas are activated when observing another's action and when executing a similar one. Applying these findings, I consider gestural (...)
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  32. Charles D. Laughlin & C. Jason Throop (2009). Husserlian Meditations and Anthropological Reflections: Toward a Cultural Neurophenomenology of Experience and Reality. Anthropology of Consciousness 20 (2):130-170.
    Most of us would agree that the world of our experience is different than the extramental reality of which we are a part. Indeed, the evidence pertaining to cultural cosmologies around the globe suggests that virtually all peoples recognize this distinction—hence the focus upon the "hidden" forces behind everyday events. That said, the struggle to comprehend the relationship between our consciousness and reality, even the reality of ourselves, has led to controversy and debate for centuries in Western philosophy. In this (...)
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  33. D. Lloyd (2013). The Music of Consciousness: Can Musical Form Harmonize Phenomenology and the Brain? Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):324-331.
    Context: Neurophenomenology lies at a rich intersection of neuroscience and lived human experience, as described by phenomenology. As a new discipline, it is open to many new questions, methods, and proposals. Problem: The best available scientific ontology for neurophenomenology is based in dynamical systems. However, dynamical systems afford myriad strategies for organizing and representing neurodynamics, just as phenomenology presents an array of aspects of experience to be captured. Here, the focus is on the pervasive experience of subjective time. There is (...)
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  34. Michael Madary (2011). The Dorsal Stream and the Visual Horizon. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):423-438.
    Today many philosophers of mind accept that the two cortical streams of visual processing in humans can be distinguished in terms of conscious experience. The ventral stream is thought to produce representations that may become conscious, and the dorsal stream is thought to handle unconscious vision for action. Despite a vast literature on the topic of the two streams, there is currently no account of the way in which the relevant empirical evidence could fit with basic Husserlian phenomenology of vision. (...)
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  35. Eduard Marbach (2008). Towards Integrating Husserlian Phenomenology with Cognitive Neuroscience of Consciousness. Synthesis Philosophica 22 (2):385-400.
    The paper presents, first, some general remarks about Husserl’s philosophical Phenomenology in view of relating it to the scientific study of consciousness, and recalls some of the basic methodological tenets of a Husserlian phenomenology of consciousness (I). It then introduces some recent work on so-called “mental imagery” in cognitive psychology and neuroscience (II). Next, a detailed exposition of a reflective analysis of conscious experiences that involve “imagery” or “images” is given (III), arguing thereby that reflective conceptual clarifications of various forms (...)
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  36. Eduard Marbach (2008). Zu einer Integrierung der Husserl'schen Phänomenologie mit der kognitiven Neurowissenwissenschaft des Bewusstseins. Synthesis Philosophica 22 (2):385-400.
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  37. Eduard Marbach (2005). On Bringing Consciousness Into the House of Science - with the Help of Husserlian Phenomenology. Angelaki 10 (1):145 – 162.
    (2005). On Bringing Consciousness into the House of Science – with the Help of Husserlian Phenomenology. Angelaki: Vol. 10, continental philosophy and the sciences the german traditionissue editor: damian veal, pp. 145-162.
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  38. Eduard Marbach (1996). Understanding the Representational Mind: A Phenomenological Perspective. [REVIEW] Human Studies 19 (2):137-52.
    This paper reflects on the relationship between Husserlian phenomenology and scientific psychology. It tries to show how phenomenological results have relevance and validity for present-day cognitive developmental psychology by arguing that consciousness matters in the study of the representational mind. The paper presents some methodological remarks concerning empirical or applied phenomenology; it describes the conception of an exploratory developmental study with 3 to 9-year-old children viewing a complex pictorial display; it then illustrates how a phenomenological interpretation of the data works; (...)
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  39. Eduard Marbach (1984). On Using Intentionality in Empirical Phenomenology: The Problem of 'Mental Images'. Dialectica 38 (2‐3):209-230.
    The theory of so-called‘mental images’, which is put forward again in contemporary cognitive psychology, is criticized by way of elaborating the distinctly different intentional structures of the mental activities of‘remembering something’and‘representing something pictorially’(by means of a painting, photo, sculpture, etc.) It is suggested that psychology in its concept and theory formation could use profitably phenomenological-descriptive analyses of the different forms of intentionality as exemplified in the paper.
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  40. Verena Mayer (2011). Husserl und die Kognitionswissenschaften. In Verena Mayer, Christopher Erhard, Marisa Scherini & Uwe Meixner (eds.), Die Aktualität Husserls. Karl Alber.
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  41. R. Mcintyre (1991). Husserl Et la Théorie Représentationnelle de l'Esprit in Phénoménologie Et Psychologie Cognitive. Les Etudes Philosophiques 1:31-56.
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  42. William McKenna, Osborne P. Wiggins & Lenore Langsdorf (1985). Reviews: Miller, 'Husserl, Perception, and Temporal Awareness'; Evans: 'The Metaphysics of Transcendental Subjectivity: Descartes, Kant, and W. Sellars'; Dreyfus (Ed.): 'Husserl, Intentionality, and Cognitive Science'. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 2 (3).
  43. Yasuhiko Murakami (2013). Affection of Contact and Transcendental Telepathy in Schizophrenia and Autism. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):179-194.
    This paper seeks to demonstrate the structural difference in communication of schizophrenia and autism. For a normal adult, spontaneous communication is nothing but the transmission of phantasía (thought) by means of perceptual objects or language. This transmission is first observed in a make-believe play of child. Husserl named this function “perceptual phantasía,” and this function presupposes as its basis the “internalized affection of contact” (which functions empirically in eye contact, body contact, or voice calling me). Regarding autism, because of the (...)
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  44. Yasuhiko Murakami (2010). Affection and Cogitatio. Psychopathology and Husserl's Theory of Meaning. Studia Phaenomenologica 10:193-204.
    Behind the phase of cognition analysed by Husserl, there is a phase of affection. In this phase, there are significant mental disorders occurring. Similar to the way in which the phase of cognition is divided into reference, meaning (referent), and representation of words (classification according to Husserl’s theory of meaning), the phase of affection is also divided into reference, “meaning,” and figure as sphere of “meaning”. The situation as a reference can allow various predications to form different explanations, i.e. different (...)
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  45. E. Mutelesi (2006). Radical Constructivism Seen with Edmund Husserl as Starting Point. Constructivist Foundations 2 (1):6-16.
    Purpose: The paper intends to investigate possible affinities between Husserlian phenomenology, mainly on the basis of Zur Phänomenologie der Intersubjektivität, and radical constructivism, essentially in its version according to Maturana and Varela. Findings: Although the two thoughts appear to be delivered in terms that can be philosophically quite abstract for the Husserlian phenomenology and that are empirical-concrete for radical constructivism in Maturana's thought, there is actually an obvious closeness between the two theories of knowledge, so that the epistemological approach used (...)
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  46. Marilyn Nissim-Sabat (2010). Husserlian Phenomenology and the Treatment of Depression: Commentary and Critique. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):53-56.
  47. Ian R. Owen (2007). On Justifying Psychotherapy: Essays for Psychotherapists on Phenomenology, Integration and Psychology. Lincoln: iUniverse.
  48. Ian R. Owen (2006). Psychotherapy and Phenomenology: On Freud, Husserl and Heidegger. Lincoln: iUniverse.
  49. Ian Owen & Neil Morris (1999). The Husserlian Phenomenology of Consciousness and Cognitive Science: We Can See the Path but Nobody is on It. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (2-3):2-3.
  50. Elisabeth Pacherie (1995). Théories Représentationnelles de l'Intentionnalité Perceptive Et Leibhaftigkeit de l'Objet Dans la Perception. Archives de Philosophie 58.
    Cet article examine un problème particulier posé par une approche naturaliste et représentationnaliste de la perception: lui est-il ou non possible de rendre compte d'une caractéristique que Husserl considérait comme constitutive de la perception, à savoir le fait que l'objet dans la perception est comme donné en personne (leibhaftig). La première section donne un bref aperçu des motivations qui sont à l'origine de l'intérêt actuellement suscité dans les sciences cognitives par l'intentionnalité perceptive. La deuxième section aborde le problème de la (...)
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