This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
507 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 507
Material to categorize
  1. Francesco Alfieri (2008). Hedwig Conrad-Martius: A Philosophical Heredity, Illustrated by E. Avé-Lallemant. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 18 (4):515-531.
    The present paper is an annotated transcription of an interview held on the 29th of August 2007 in E. Avé-Lallemant’s flat in Munich. He was Hedwig Conrad-Martius’ assistant, carried on her work and research, and filed her legacy, which is deposited at the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek in Munich. In this interview Avé-Lallemant remembers Conrad-Martius as a person and as a philosopher and discusses her philosophical evolution within Husserl’s phenomenological school, the relationship between biology and phenomenology, her rediscovering of Aristotelian philosophy, and, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Eran Dorfman (2013). Naturalism, Objectivism and Everyday Life. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:117-133.
    In this paper I analyse the role of naturalism and objectivism in everyday life according to Husserl and Merleau-Ponty. Whereas Husserl attributes the naturalistic attitude mainly to science, he defines the objectivist attitude as a naiveté which equally applies to the natural attitude of everyday life. I analyse the relationship between the natural attitude and lived experience and show Husserl's hesitation regarding the task of phenomenology in describing the lived experience of everyday life, since he considers this experience to be (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jesús Adrián Escudero (2013). The Topicality of Husserlian Phenomenology: Overcoming Old Commonplaces and Opening New Fields of Research [Spanish]. Eidos 18:12-45.
    In the frame of a new discovery of phenomenology, the present essay offers different arguments to overcome the classical interpretation of Husserl considering him a prototypical solipsist. First we refute Dreyfus’ mentalistic misunderstanding of Husserlian phenomenology, and show that his philosophical program is beyond the traditional dichotomy between internalism and externalism. Second, it is our aim to point out some of the fundamental contributions made by Husserl’s phenomenology to the cognitive sciences and analytical philosophy of mind, especially highlighting the importance (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Marvin Farber (1940). The Ideal of a Presuppositionless Philosophy. In Marvin Farber & Edmund Husserl (eds.), Philosophical Essays in Memory of Edmund Husserl. Cambridge, Mass.,Published for the University of Buffalo by the Harvard University Press. 44--64.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. John Haglund (forthcoming). The View From Somewhere - Investigations Pertaining to the Implications of the Impurity of the Third- and the First-Person-Perspective. Continental Philosophy Review.
    The old duality that eventually came to produce the mind/body-problem indicates the problem of transcendental subjectivity. The enduring significance of this problem shows itself in a provocation of any paradigm that has become too objectivistic, too naturalistic – even too idealistic in a certain sense – and too forgetful of its own departure from a perspective always presumed. Analytic philosophy bears a tendency towards such a ‘view from nowhere’ which denies a fundamental subjective connection. The rebuttal of this position entails (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Hanne Jacobs (2010). I Am Awake: Husserlian Reflections on Wakefulness and Attention. Alter. Revue de Phénoménologie 18 (1):183-201.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Hanne Jacobs (2010). Towards a Phenomenological Account of Personal Identity. In Ierna Carlo, Jacobs Hanne & Mattens Filip (eds.), Philosophy, Phenomenology, Sciences: Essays in Commemoration of Edmund Husserl. Springer. 333--361.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Wayne M. Martin (1999). Husserl's Relapse? Concerning a Fregean Challenge to Phenomenology. Inquiry 42 (3 & 4):343 – 369.
    An influential interpretation of phenomenology construes Husserl's project as an attempt to generalize the Fregean notion of sense- an attempt to extend Frege's analysis of the structure of meaningful expressions to a more general account of the structure of meaning in experience . Michael Dummett has articulated a broadly Fregean critique of this Husserlian program, arguing that the project is misguided and retrograde-a relapse into the psychologism and idealism that Frege sought to avoid. A defense of Husserl is offered, based (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Tom Nenon (2010). Husserl's Theory of the Mental. In Thomas Nenon & Lester Embree (eds.), Issues in Husserl's II (Contributions to Phenomenology). 223--235.
    The organization of the text in Husserl’s Ideas II is notoriously difficult to follow. In its focus and in its method of procedure, it shifts back and forth from one attitude to another, from the practical to the theoretical and back again, the transcendental to the mundane, the naturalistic to the personalistic, and the scientific to the everyday. Furthermore, it exhibits a recurring tendency to double back and fill in something that the reader thought had already been established, and then (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Dominique Pradelle (2012). Par-Delà la Révolution Copernicienne: Sujet Transcendantal Et Facultés Chez Kant Et Husserl. Presses Universitaires de France.
  11. Marcus Sacrini (2013). The Making of Phenomenology as an Autonomous Discipline. Phaenex 8 (1):208-232.
    The present article analyses the transformation of the first version of phenomenology, introduced by Husserl in the Prolegomena to Pure Logic (1900), into the transcendental phenomenology as outlined in Introduction to Logic and Theory of Knowledge (1906-7). First, it is argued that phenomenology was initially conceived as a discipline that should clarify the legitimacy of the objective constructions of pure logic by relating them to the corresponding subjective acts of thought. Then, it is shown that Husserl acknowledges that this first (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. David Woodruff Smith (2007). Husserl. Routledge.
    In this stimulating introduction, David Woodruff Smith introduces the whole of Husserl’s thought, demonstrating his influence on philosophy of mind and language, on ontology and epistemology, and on philosophy of logic, mathematics and science. Starting with an overview of his life and works, and his place in twentieth-century philosophy, and in western philosophy as a whole, David Woodruff Smith introduces Husserl’s concept of phenomenology, explaining his influential theories of intentionality, objectivity and subjectivity. In subsequent chapters he covers Husserl’s logic, metaphysics, (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Husserl: Phenomenological Method
  1. Lilian Alweiss (2013). Beyond Existence and Non-Existence. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (3):448-469.
    When Husserl speaks of the so-called ?transcendental reduction? or ?phenomenological epoch?? many believe that he is eschewing the question of truth or existence. Two reasons are given for this: First, Husserl explicitly states that when we perform the reduction, we should no longer naively ?accept [the world] as it presents itself to me as factually existing? (Id I ?30, p. 53) and should suspend our judgement with regard to ?the positing of its actual being? (Id I ?88, p. 182). Second, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Leo J. Bostar (1991). Method and Experience. Journal of Philosophical Research 16:63-83.
    A persistent criticism of Edmund Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology is that it begs the question of its own possibiIity as science. In this essay I propose a reading of Husserl which addresses this question and attempts to show that the phenomenological ideal of freedom from all presuppositions, that is, the ideal of radical methodological autonomy, is not dogmatically assumed as valid but rests on a conception of philosophy which, although not explicitly formulated by Husserl, nevertheless informs his thinking on questions of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Steven Ravett Brown, Must Phenomenology Rest on Paradox?
    Husserl made certain assumptions about the nature of the components of experienced phenomena derived from and similar to the assumptions of the psychologists of his time. I will present some of those assumptions, and argue, and support that argument with evidence, that they are incorrect. I claim that if that is true, then Husserlian methodology is flawed, to the extent that for certain investigations both the epoch? and the method of eidetic variation necessitate circularity which invalidates their utility. These arguments (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Steven Ravett Brown (2004). Structural Phenomenology: An Empirically-Based Model of Consciousness. Dissertation, University of Oregon
    In this dissertation I develop a structural model of phenomenal consciousness that integrates contemporary experimental and theoretical work in philosophy and cognitive science. I argue that phenomenology must be “naturalized” and that it should be acknowledged as a major component of empirical research. I use this model to describe important phenomenal structures, and I then employ it to provide a detailed explication of tip-of-tongue phenomena. The primary aim of “structural phenomenology” is the creation of a general framework within which descriptions (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Wenjing Cai (2012). From Adequacy to Apodicticity. Development of the Notion of Reflection in Husserl's Phenomenology. Husserl Studies 29 (1):13-27.
    The article explores a gradual refinement of the notion of reflection in Husserlian phenomenology. In his early period, Husserl takes phenomenological reflection to attain adequate evidence, since its object is self-given in an absolute and complete manner. However, this conception of reflection does not remain unchanged. Husserl later realizes that immanent perception or phenomenological reflection also involves a certain horizonality and naivety that has to do with its temporal nature and must be queried in a further critical, apodictic reflection. Focusing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Kyeong-Seop Choi (2007). Philosophy as Rigorous Regional Studies: A Parody of E. Husserl's Philosophy as Rigorous Science. Idealistic Studies 37 (3):203-218.
    The present paper traces the trajectory of the development of Husserl’s phenomenology from its incipient eidetic phase over the transcendental to the lifeworld-phenomenological, and ascertains that, in spite of all their complexities, the idea of Zu den Sachen selbst is the very objective of all those ‘phenomenological’investigations. The search after the ‘immediately given’ (Vorgegebenheiten) finally discovers that the concrete cultural life-worlds are the authentically ‘immediatelypre-given’ and all kinds of knowledge and sciences (higher cultural configurations) are nothing but idealizations of those (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Daniele De Santis (2011). Phenomenological Kaleidoscope. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 11:16-41.
    The main goal of this article is to examine Edmund Husserl’s method of “eidetic variation”—that is, to examine the way this method is supposed to work in connection with the notion of “similarity” (Ähnlichkeit). Unlike most interpretations, it will be suggested that similarity represents the leading methodologicalprinciple of eidetic variation. We will argue, therefore, that, on the one hand, this method is rooted in the sphere of association and passivity while, on the otherhand, it is constituted by the transposition of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. John J. Drummond (2008). Wholes, Parts, and Phenomenological Methodology (Ⅲ. Logische Untersuchung). In Verena Mayer (ed.), Edmund Husserl: Logische Untersuchungen. Akademie Verlag Berlin. 35--105.
  9. Denis Fisette (2012). Phenomenology and Phenomenalism: Ernst Mach and the Genesis of Husserl's Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 22 (1):53-74.
    How do we reconcile Husserl’s repeated criticism of Mach’s phenomenalism almost everywhere in his work with the leading role that Husserl seems to attribute to Mach in the genesis of his own phenomenology? To answer this question, we shall examine, first, the narrow relation that Husserl establishes between his phenomenological method and Mach’s descriptivism. Second, we shall examine two aspects of Husserl’s criticism of Mach: the first concerns phenomenalism and Mach’s doctrine of elements, while the second concerns the principle of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Aron Gurwitsch (2010). On the Object of Thought : Methodological and Phenomenological Reflections. In J. J. Drummond & Lester Embree (eds.), The Phenomenology of the Noema (Contributions to Phenomenology). Springer. 9--27.
    Entitled merely “On the Object of Thought,” Chapter 8 of Gurwitsch’s Studies in Phenomenology and Psychology (Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 1966) has the following note attached to its title: “Paper read at the meeting of the Phenomenological Society, April 27, 1946, at Hunter College, New York City. It was not possible to include here all the discussion. The original version was published in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research VII (1947).” What seems the integral script read at the International Phenomenological Society (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Klaus Held (2003). Husserl's Phenomenological Method. In Donn Welton (ed.), THE NEW HUSSERL: A Critical Reader. INDIANA University.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Hanne Jacobs (2007). Lavigne, Jean-François, Husserl Et la Naissance de la Phénoménologie (1900–1913). Des Recherches Logiques aux Ideen: La Genèse de l'Idéalisme Transcendantal Phénoménologique. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 23 (1):71-82.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Shojiro Kotegawa (2008). Epoché and Teleology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 19:41-48.
    In Husserl’s phenomenology, there are two essential moments; one is the Epoché which makes the phenomenology possible, the other is the teleology of science which directs it to its own goal (telos). The former, later appeared in Husserl’s text, does not seem quite consistent with the latter – on the contrary, theseseem so exclusive that a question arises as to whether Husserl could reconcile Epoché with teleology consistently claimed from the beginning of his career. My aim in this paper is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jean-François Lavigne (2005). Husserl Et la Naissance de la Phénoménologie, 1900-1913: Des Recherches Logiques aux Ideen: La Genèse de l'Idéalisme Transcendantal Phénoménologique. [REVIEW] Presses Universitaires de France.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Poul Lübcke (1999). A Semantic Interpretation of Husserl's Epoché. Synthese 118 (1):1-12.
    This paper presents an interpretation of Husserl''s phenomenological epoché or bracketing ( Einklammerung), which makes it possible to compare his position with philosophical programs developed within the framework of modern analytical philosophy. At the same time it asks in what sense Husserl''s phenomenology is a form of idealism or exceeds the traditional discussion of idealism versus realism.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Sebastian Luft (2011). Subjectivity and Lifeworld in Transcendental Phenomenology. Northwestern University Press.
    Part 1. Husserl: the outlines of the transcendental-phenomenological system -- 1. Husserl's phenomenological discovery of the natural attitude -- 2. Husserl's theory of the phenomenological reduction: between lifeworld and Cartesianism -- 3. Some methodological problems arising in Husserl's late reflections on the phenomenological reduction -- 4. Facticity and historicity as constituents of the lifeworld in Husserl's late philosophy -- 5. Husserl's concept of the "transcendental person": another look at the Husserl-Heidegger relationship -- 6. Dialectics of the absolute: the systematics of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Sebastian Luft (2009). Reconstruction and Reduction : Natorp and Husserl on Method and the Question of Subjectivity. In Rudolf A. Makkreel & Sebastian Luft (eds.), Neo-Kantianism in Contemporary Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
  18. Eduard Marbach (2013). "Wer hat Angst vor der reinen Phänomenologie?" Reflexion, Reduktion und Eidetik un Husserls Phänomenologie. In Stefania Centrone (ed.), Versuche über Husserl. Meiner.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Karl Mertens (1994). Remarks on Phenomenology in Germany: The Relevance of Husserl's Phenomenological Method to a Philosophical Movement. Cogito 8 (3):218-225.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Eric J. Mohr (2012). Phenomenological Intuition and the Problem of Philosophy as Method and Science: Scheler and Husserl. Symposium 16 (2):218-234.
    Scheler subjects Husserl’s categorial intuition to a critique, which calls into question the very methodological procedure of phenomenology. Scheler’s divergence from Husserl with respect to whether sensory or categorial contents furnish the foundation of the act of intuition leads into a more significant divergence with respect to whether phenomenology should, primarily, be considered a form of science to which a specific methodology applies. Philosophical methods, according to Scheler, must presuppose, and not distract from, important preconditions of knowledge that pertain more (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Alan Murray (2002). Philosophy and the 'Anteriority Complex'. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (1):27-47.
    The project of naturalising phenomenology is examined within the larger context of the philosophy of science. Transcendental phenomenology, as defended by Husserl, in opposition to the naturalistic enterprise, reflects a particular way of thinking about philosophy and its relationship to the empirical sciences that stands as an obstacle to the project of naturalisation. This paper develops a critique of a basic assumption made in this conception of philosophy, namely that it is possible to ask and answer questions concerning knowledge in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Peeter Müürsepp (2008). Husserl's Reductions as Method. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 19:113-119.
    Edmund Husserl believed that he had a method in phenomenology, which could be systematically applied. The essence of the method concerned the so-called “bracketing” of the objects outside of our consciousness. Husserl elaborated his idea through the conception of reductions, which he divided into eidetic,transcendental and phenomenological ones. The conception has recently been carefully analyzed by Dagfinn Føllesdal, an outstanding analytical thinker. But he had do admit that Husserl was not consistent in applying his method. Definitely, the core of Husserl’s (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Felix O'Murchadha (2008). Reduction, Externalism and Immanence in Husserl and Heidegger. Synthese 160 (3):375 - 395.
    This paper argues that the Husserl—Heidegger relationship is systematically misunderstood when framed in terms of a distinction between internalism and externalism. Both philosophers, it is argued, employ the phenomenological reduction to immanence as a fundamental methodological instrument. After first outlining the assumptions regarding inner and outer and the individual and the social from which recent epistemological interpretations of phenomenology begin, I turn to the question of Husserl's internalism. I argue that Husserl can only be understood as an internalist on the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. M. M. Van De Pitte (1976). Husserl: The Idealist Malgre Lui. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 37 (1):70 - 78.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Daniel Quesada (2007). Making Room for Philosophy. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 6:19-23.
    This paper traces the development of transcendental philosophy in the 20th century back to the strongly perceived need to preserve an exclusive area of a priori research for philosophy. It will argue that a genuine sort of aprioristic philosophical inquiry does not in fact require the step from descriptive psychology to transcendental phenomenology taken by Husserl and well attested in his works from at least his 1911 essay "Philosophy as Strict Science", nor does it require the "detranscendentalization" of Husserlian phenomenology (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Stefanie Rocknak (2002). Husserl’s Phenomenologization of Hume; Reflections on Husserl’s Method of Epoché. Philosophy Today 45 (5):28-36.
    This paper argues that Husserl’s method is partially driven by an attempt to avoid certain absurdities inherent in Hume’s epistemology. In this limited respect, we may say that Hume opened the door to phenomenology, but as a sacrificial lamb. However, Hume was well aware of his self-defeating position, and perhaps, in some respects, the need for an alternative. Moreover, Hume’s “mistakes” may have incited Husserl’s discovery of the epoche, and thus, transcendental phenomenology.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Martina Roesner (2008). Das Große Spiel der Epoché. Die Transzendentalphänomenologische Einstellung Zwischen Natürlichem Weltverhalten Und Theoretischer Wissenschaft. Husserl Studies 24 (1):31-52.
    Husserls Ansatz der Transzendentalphänomenologie wird gemeinhin als Versuch einer rationalen Letztbegründung von Erkenntnis überhaupt gedeutet. Sein Verständnis der konstitutiven Rolle des reinen Bewußtseins gegenüber dem Weltphänomen als solchem sowie seine Betonung des teleologischen Aspektes der transzendentalen Vernunft scheint sein Denken von vornherein in radikalen Gegensatz zu all jenen phänomenologischen Entwürfen zu bringen, die – wie etwa Heidegger oder Fink – die Beziehung von Subjekt und Welt sowie die Philosophie als ganze wesentlich vom Spiel her zu verstehen suchen. Andererseits hat die (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. James K. A. Smith (2000). Taking Husserl at His Word. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 4 (1):89-115.
    For Husserl, the natural attitude - and hence any further explication of it - is put out of play, bracketed by the phenomenological epoché, which, of course, is not to deny its existence, but only to turn our theoretical gaze elsewhere. As Husserl remarks, “the single facts, the facticity of the natural world taken universally, disappear from our theoretical regard” (Id 60/68). The project of the young Heidegger, I will argue, is precisely a concern with facticity, taking up this forgotten (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Gianfranco Soldati (1996). Bedeutungen und Gegenständlichkeiten Zu Tugendhats sprachanalytischer Kritik von Husserls früher Phänomenologie. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 50 (3):410 - 441.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Abraham D. Stone, Husserl, Heidegger and Carnap on Fixing the Sense of Philosophical Terminology.
    The train of thought I will follow here begins with two facts about Husserl. First, the main and most intractable problems in interpreting him, and the major conflicts between his interpreters, arise from and are fed by the equivocality and unsteady meaning of his terminology. Second, Husserl has a highly developed theory of terminology, beginning with, but by no means limited to, the earliest periods of his thought. This theory of terminology, moreover, focuses on the causes of equivocality and unsteadiness (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Elisabeth Ströker (1978). Husserls Evidenzprinzip. Sinn und Grenzen einer methodischen Norm der Phänomenologie als Wissenschaft. Für Ludwig Landgrebe zum 75. Geburtstag. [REVIEW] Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 32 (1):3 - 30.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Amie L. Thomasson (2005). First-Person Knowledge in Phenomenology. In David Woodruff Smith & Amie L. Thomasson (eds.), Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 115--138.
    An account of the source of first-person knowledge is essential not just for phenomenology, but for anyone who takes seriously the apparent evidence that we each have a distinctive access to knowing what we experience. One standard way to account for the source of first-person knowledge is by appeal to a kind of inner observation of the passing contents of one’s own mind, and phenomenology is often thought to rely on introspection. I argue, however, that Husserl’s method of phenomenological reduction (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Amie L. Thomasson (2003). Introspection and Phenomenological Method. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (3):239-54.
    It is argued that the work of Husserl offers a model for self-knowledge that avoids the disadvantages of standard introspectionist accounts and of a Sellarsian view of the relation between our perceptual judgements and derived judgements about appearances. Self-knowledge is based on externally directed knowledge of the world that is then subjected to a cognitive transformation analogous to the move from a statement to the activity of stating. Appearance talk is (contra Sellars) not an epistemically non-committal form of speech, but (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Rd Walsh (1988). Husserl's Epoche as Method and Truth in Papers From the Spring 1987 University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign Graduate Student Conference. Auslegung 14 (2):211-223.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Terry Winant (1991). Who has Difficulty Making Which Aspect of the World Intelligible to Whom? Social Epistemology 5 (4):317 – 326.
    Abstract Following Hubert Dreyfus, this paper takes up the debate over the limits on what can be articulated by means of intentional analysis. Section 1 reviews the contrast between Husserl's position and Heidegger's position. Husserl's is an ?inexhaustibility theory? of the inarticulable, according to which, although it is in principle impossible to articulate everything, there is not anything that it is in principle impossible to articulate. Heidegger's is a genuine ?inarticulability?in?principle theory? of the inarticulable, according to which it is, in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Dan Zahavi (2007). A Question of Method. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 12:111-118.
    In his Allgemeine Psychologie of 1912, Natorp formulates a by now classical criticism of phenomenology. 1. Phenomenology claims to describe and analyze lived subjectivity itself. In order to do so it employs a reflective methodology. But reflection is a kind of internal perception; it is a theoretical attitude; it involves an objectification. And as Natorp then asks, how is this objectifying procedure ever going to provide us with access to lived subjectivity itself? 2. Phenomenology aims at describing the experiential structures (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Richard M. Zaner (2012). At Play in the Field of Possibles. An Essay on the Foundation of Self and Free-Fantasy Variational Method. Zeta Books.
    This study is a phenomenological inquiry into several relatively unexplored phenomena, including certain key methodological issues. It seeks to elicit and explicate the grounds of free-fantasy variation, which Husserl insists contains his “fundamental methodological insight” since it articulates “the fundamental form of all particular transcendental methods…” In the course of pursuing the full sense of this method and its grounds, the essay also uncovers the origins and eventual presence of “self” and explores the multiple connections among self, mental life, embodiment (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Husserl: Transcendental and Phenomenological Reduction
  1. Anthony F. Beavers (2002). Phenomenology and Artificial Intelligence. Metaphilosophy 33 (1-2):70-82.
    In CyberPhilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing, edited by James H. Moor and Terrell Ward Bynum (Oxford, UK: Blackwell, 2002), 66-77. Also in Metaphilosophy 33.1/2 (2002): 70-82.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 507