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Summary Edmund Husserl worked on various topics that are currently investigated in philosophy of mind, e.g., self-consciousness, time consciousness, perceptual and other kinds of intentionality, and philosophers of mind draw upon Husserl’s work. We may therefore say that Husserl had a kind of philosophy of mind, with the distinguishing feature of being developed thoroughgoingly from the first-person perspective. The Husserlian philosophy of mind is a study of how there arise, or are “constituted,” in consciousness, perceptual and other objectivity, as well as one’s own and the others’ embodied selves. Guided by these rather general, fundamental concerns, its scope mostly excludes issues and discussions where the philosophical interest is focused more narrowly, e.g., on the foundations of a specific scientific discipline, or on a different branch of philosophy that presupposes an investigation of the mind.
Key works There are a number of recent collections of papers dealing, either in whole or in significant part, with aspects of what might be called the Husserlian philosophy of mind, or exploring the interconnections between Husserl's phenomenology and the analytic philosophy of mind: Smith & Thomasson 2005, Frank & Weidtmann 2010, Mayer et al 2011, Embree & Nenon 2012, Centrone 2013, Ierna et al 2010, Vandevelde & Luft 2010, and Welton 2003. Also, Beyer 2000 and Szanto 2012 are two recent monographs discussing the relations between Husserlian phenomenology and the analytic philosophy of mind (and language).
Introductions See Beyer 2003 for an encyclopedia article on Husserl's philosophy, including themes from the philosophy of mind. For a brief, introductory discussion of Husserlian phenomenology vis-a-vis the analytic philosophy of mind, see Smith & Thomasson 2003.
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  1. Aurel Kolnai, Barry Smith & Carolyn Korsmeyer (2004). On Disgust. Open Court.
    The problem of disgust has until recently been neglected in the scientific literature. In comparison to the scientific (psychological and metaphysical) interest that has been applied to hatred, anxiety, and similar phenomena, disgust — although a common and important factor in our emotional life — has been unexplored, or it has been viewed as a “higher degree of dislike,” as “nausea,” or as a phenomenon of the “repression of urges.” We here show how the feeling of disgust possesses a unique (...)
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  2. Eduard Marbach (1988). How to Study Consciousness Phenomenologically or Quite a Lot Comes to Mind. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 19 (October):252-268.
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Husserl: Consciousness
Husserl: Time Consciousness
  1. Alia Al-Saji (2009). An Absence That Counts in the World: Merleau-Ponty’s Later Philosophy of Time in Light of Bernet’s 'Einleitung'. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 40 (2):207-227.
    This paper examines Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s later philosophy of time in light of his critique and reconceptualization of Edmund Husserl’s early time-analyses. Drawing on The Visible and the Invisible and lecture courses, I elaborate Merleau-Ponty’s re-reading of Husserl’s time-analyses through the lens of Rudolf Bernet’s “Einleitung” to this work. My question is twofold: what becomes of the central Husserlian concepts of present and retention in Merleau-Ponty’s later work, and how do Husserl’s elisions, especially of the problem of forgetting, become generative moments (...)
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  2. Liliana Albertazzi (1993). Brentano, Meinong and Husserl on Internal Time. Brentano Studien 3:89-110.
    Brentano's Descriptive Psychology marks a breakthrough into clarification of internal time, made possible by using his doctrine of intentionality (and modality) of consciousness. Husserl's version of descriptive psychology, a pure phenomenological psychology, according to its author tries to overcome Brentano's (naturalistic) description of internal experience by explicitly considering the intentional content of mental events, and the different categories of objects as objects of a possible consciousness. Husserl's investigations on internal time are an example of a quite specific sort of genetic (...)
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  3. Alexandra Alván (2013). Estructuras trinitarias en la constitución y conciencia del tiempo en Agustín y Husserl. Estudios de Filosofía 10:11-38.
    El presente artículo busca establecer paralelos entre las propuestas de Edmund Husserl y de San Agustín en torno a la constitución del tiempo por parte de la conciencia. En ese marco, proponemos que ambos autores basan la constitución del tiempo en estructuras trinitarias de la conciencia. Dichas estructuras, a pesar de sus diferencias, coinciden en constar de tres elementos: uno retencional, uno protencional y uno impresional. Además, coinciden ambas propuestas en que lo fundamental de la estructura trinitaria de la conciencia (...)
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  4. Pedro M. S. Alves (2008). Objective Time and the Experience of Time: Husserl's Theory of Time in Light of Some Theses of A. Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 24 (3):205-229.
    In this paper, I start with the opposition between the Husserlian project of a phenomenology of the experience of time, started in 1905, and the mathematical and physical theory of time as it comes out of Einstein’s special theory of relativity in the same year. Although the contrast between the two approaches is apparent, my aim is to show that the original program of Husserl’s time theory is the constitution of an objective time and a time of the world, starting (...)
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  5. Pedro M. S. Alves (2008). Objective Time and the Experience of Time: Husserl's Theory of Time in Light of Some Theses of A. Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity. Husserl Studies 24 (3):205-229.
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  6. John Anders (2010). Aporetic Approach to Husserl's Reflections on Time. In Pol Vandevelde & Sebastian Luft (eds.), Epistemology, Archaeology, Ethics: Current Investigations of Husserl's Corpus. Continuum.
    This chapter will examine two puzzles that percolate Husserl’s On the Phenomenology of the Consciousness of Internal Time (PITC). They concern: (1) whether or not memory is pictorial and (2) whether or not the temporal determinations (past, now, future, etc.) are categories. Considering these aporetic discussions helps us to understand the time diagrams Husserl uses, as well as some of the motivation behind Husserl’s talk of the two intentionalities of retention and his talk of the time-constituting flow. Moreover, this approach (...)
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  7. Holly Andersen (2013). The Representation of Time in Agency. In Adrian Bardon & Heather Dyke (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Philosophy of Time. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This paper outlines some key issues that arise when agency and temporality are considered jointly, from the perspective of psychology, cognitive neuroscience, phenomenology, and action theory. I address the difference between time simpliciter and time as represented as it figures in phenomena like intentional binding, goal-oriented action plans, emulation systems, and ‘temporal agency’. An examination of Husserl’s account of time consciousness highlights difficulties in generalizing his account to include a substantive notion of agency, a weakness inherited by explanatory projects like (...)
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  8. Holly Andersen & Rick Grush (2009). A Brief History of Time-Consciousness: Historical Precursors to James and Husserl. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):277-307.
    William James’ Principles of Psychology, in which he made famous the ‘specious present’ doctrine of temporal experience, and Edmund Husserl’s Zur Phänomenologie des inneren Zeitbewusstseins, were giant strides in the philosophical investigation of the temporality of experience. However, an important set of precursors to these works has not been adequately investigated. In this article, we undertake this investigation. Beginning with Reid’s essay ‘Memory’ in Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man, we trace out a line of development of ideas about (...)
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  9. Jose M. Arcaya (1989). Memory and Temporality: A Phenomenological Alternative. Philosophical Psychology 2 (1):101-110.
    The notion of memory storage, central to most contemporary theories of remembering, is challenged from a philosophical perspective as being contradictory and untenable. It criticizes this storage hypothesis as relying upon a linear explanation of time, an assumption which results in infinite regression, solipsism, and a failure to contact the real past. A model based on the phenomenological viewpoints of Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty is offered as an alternative paradigm. Finally, a research method suggested by this descriptive approach to (...)
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  10. Aron Pilotto Barco (2012). A descrição do agora em Husserl. Revista Inquietude 3 (1):30-51.
    What is the sense of saying “now”? We are used to the established temporal relations by their points of reference (like “yesterday”), distinguished one from the other by measurement and the counting of time (which uses yardsticks, like “day”). So, is the now only another one of these points? Husserl tells us that is not only looking at the constituted time and already shared in common by the world that we will comprehend what is the sense of the now. In (...)
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  11. Elizabeth A. Behnke (2009). Bodily Protentionality. Husserl Studies 25 (3):185-217.
    This investigation explores the methodological implications of choosing an unusual example for phenomenological description (here, a bodily awareness practice allowing spontaneous bodily shifts to occur at the leading edge of the living present); for example, the matters themselves are not pregiven, but must first be brought into view. Only after preliminary clarifications not only of the practice concerned, but also of the very notions of the “body” and of “protentionality” is it possible to provide both static and genetic descriptions of (...)
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  12. Jocelyn Benoist (2008). Modes temporels de la conscience et réalité du temps: Husserl et Brentano sur le temps. In , La conscience du temps. Vrin. 11--28.
  13. W. Bergmann & G. Hoffmann (1989). The Other as Future and Present-Interpreting the Experience of Another Personality in Temporal Concepts According to Levinas and Husserl. Husserl Studies 6 (2):155-175.
  14. Werner Bergmann & Gisbert Hoffmann (1989). Selbstreferenz Und Zeit: Die Dynamische Stabilität des Bewusstseins. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 6 (2):155-175.
    Dieser Beitrag stellt die Zeitlichkeit des Bewusstseins und ihre Folgeprobleme in einer neuen Perspektive vor, die sich aus der Verknüpfung der empirischen Theorie selbstreferentieller Systeme mit der transzendentalen Phänomenologie Edmund Husserls ergibt. -/- .
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  15. R. Bernet (2009). La présentification du passé et la question d'une métaphysique de la présence. Notes sur la temporalité chez Husserl. Cahiers du Centre D’Études Phénoménologiques:9-32.
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  16. Rudolf Bernet (forthcoming). Die Frage nach dem Ursprung der Zeit bei Husserl und Heidegger. Heidegger Studies:89-104.
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  17. Rudolf Bernet (2009). Husserl's Early Time-Analysis in Historical Context. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 40 (2):117-154.
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  18. Rudolf Bernet (2002). Die neue Phänomenologie des Zeitbewusstseins in Husserls Bernauer Manuskripten. In H. Hüni & P. Trawny (eds.), Die erscheinende Welt. Festschrift für Klaus Held. Duncker & Humblot.
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  19. Rudolf Bernet (1987). Origine du Temps Et Temps Originaire Chez Husserl Et Heidegger. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 85 (4):499-521.
  20. Rudolf Bernet & Wilson Brown (1982). Is the Present Ever Present? Phenomenology and the Metaphysics of Presence. Research in Phenomenology 12 (1):85-112.
  21. Bárbara Bettocchi (2013). La experiencia del tiempo en Funes el memorioso a la luz de las Lecciones de fenomenología de la conciencia interna del tiempo de Edmund Husserl. Estudios de Filosofía 10:39-51.
    El artículo busca presentar las reflexiones acerca de la conciencia interna del tiempo de Edmund Husserl, compiladas en las Lecciones de fenomenología de la conciencia del tiempo de 1928, a la luz del retrato que hace Borges del personaje del cuento Funes el memorioso. Intenta mostrar cómo es que en ambos casos están presentes los mismos cuestionamientos acerca de nuestra experiencia del tiempo y de la persistencia de nuestra identidad en la memoria, y cómo ambas concepciones implican una crítica al (...)
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  22. Christian Beyer (2010). Husserls Bewusstseinskonzeption im Lichte der neueren Diskussion. In Manfred Frank Niels Weidtmann (ed.), Husserl und die Philosophie des Geistes.
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  23. Victor Biceaga (2006). Temporality and Boredom. Continental Philosophy Review 39 (2):135-153.
    In this paper, I argue that Heidegger’s phenomenological investigation of boredom offers important clues for better understanding the notoriously difficult notion of non-objectifying intentionality (Längsintentionalität). I begin by examining Husserl’s account of the aporetic nature of self-temporalization and I claim that a discussion of moods can further clarify the relation between Längsintentionalität and the absolute time-constituting consciousness. Although Husserl himself broached the problem of the intentionality of moods, it was Heidegger who gave us a full-blown account of it. I point (...)
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  24. F. Blascak (2005). On Husserl's Concept of Inner Time Consciousness. Filozofia 60 (3):170-175.
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  25. John Brough (2011). “The Most Difficult of All Phenomenological Problems”. Husserl Studies 27 (1):27-40.
    I argue in this essay that Edmund Husserl distinguishes three levels within time-consciousness: an absolute time-constituting flow of consciousness, the immanent acts of consciousness the flow constitutes, and the transcendent objects the acts intend. The immediate occasion for this claim is Neal DeRoo’s discussion of Dan Zahavi’s reservations about the notion of an absolute flow and DeRoo’s own efforts to mediate between Zahavi’s view and the position Robert Sokolowski and I have advanced. I argue that the flow and the tripartite (...)
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  26. John Brough (1989). Husserl's Phenomenology of Time-Consciousness. In William R. McKenna & J. N. Mohanty (eds.), Husserl's Phenomenology: A Textbook. University Press of America. 249--290.
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  27. John Brough (1972). The Emergence of an Absolute Consciousness in Husserl's Early Writings on Time-Consciousness. Man and World 5 (3):298-326.
    The collection of Edmund Husserl's sketches on time-consciousness from the years 1893-1917, edited by Rudolf Boehm and published as Volume X in the Husserliana series, affords significant new material for the study of the evolution of Husserl's thought. Specifically, the sketches suggest that in the course of analyzing the consciousness of temporal objects Husserl became convinced that a distinction must be drawn between an ultimate or absolute flow of consciousness and the immanent temporal objects or contents -- sense-data, appearances of (...)
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  28. John B. Brough (2012). Temporality, Transcendence, and Difference: Some Reflections on Nicolas de Warren's 'Husserl and the Promise of Time'. Research in Phenomenology 42 (1):130-137.
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  29. John B. Brough (1993). Husserl and the Deconstruction of Time. Review of Metaphysics 46 (3):503 - 536.
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  30. John B. Brough (1975). Husserl on Memory. The Monist 59 (1):40-62.
    The point of departure for husserl's mature account of memory is his rejection of the traditional view that what is immediately and directly experienced in memory is a present image or replica of what is past and not what is past itself. Husserl rejects the image theory on logical and descriptive grounds, Arguing that memory is a direct consciousness of the past. Memory is experienced as a unique mode of consciousness giving its object in a manner irreducible to pictorial or (...)
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  31. John B. Brough, Bernard P. Dauenhauer & Karl Schuhmann (1987). Three Book Reviews: Edmund Husserl. 'Texte Zur Phänomenologie des Inneren Zeitbewusstseins (1893-1917)' Ed. Rudolf Bernet. Robert Sokolowski: 'Moral Action: A Phenomenological Study'. Hugo Dingler: 'Aufsätze der Methodik' Ed. Ulrich Weiss. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 4 (3).
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  32. Ronald Bruzina (2000). There is More to the Phenomenology of Time Than Meets the Eye. In John B. Brough (ed.), The Many Faces of Time. Kluwer. 67--84.
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  33. David Carr (2009). Experience, Temporality and History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (4):335-354.
    Philosophers' reflections on history have been dominated for decades by two themes: representation and memory. On both of these accounts, historical inquiry is divided by a certain gap from what it seeks to find or wants to know, and its activity is seen by philosophers as that of bridging this gap. Against this background, the concept of experience, in spite of its apparent rootedness in the present, can be revived as a means of thinking about our connection to the past. (...)
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  34. David Carr (1986). Le passé à venir : ordre et articulation du temps selon Husserl, Dilthey et Heidegger. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 42 (3):333-344.
    L'appartenance de Dilthey, de Husserl et de Heidegger à la même tradition philosophique (la tradition «phénoménologique» au sens le plus large de ce terme) les mène à des analyses très semblables de la temporalité humaine. Néanmoins, chacun privilégie dans son analyse une seule des trois « dimensions » du temps: Husserl, le présent ; Heidegger, le futur ; Dilthey, le passé. Dans cet article, cette divergence est l'occasion d'une réflexion sur le temps humain qui cherche à dépasser la question de (...)
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  35. Deborah Chaffin (1985). Edmund Husserl, 'The Apodicticity of Recollection'. Husserl Studies 2 (1):3-32.
    The text "The Apodicticity of Recollection" dates from 1922-23, and may be viewed as Husserl's clear recognition of the extent to which the descriptive phenomenology of immediacy is bound up with a reconstructive phenomenology of justificiation. Such recognition is manifest through the original treatment he gives the analysis of internal time-consciousness, and especially memory. In addition, his remarks on the nature of the transcendental ego add much strength to the interpretation of this text as a contribution to Husserl's longstanding concern (...)
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  36. Jane Chamberlain (2002). Thinking Time. Journal of Philosophical Research 27:281-299.
    Paul Ricoeur holds that the “principal ambition” characterising Husserl’s phenomenology of internal time-consciousness is that of “making time itself appear.” Ricoeur thinks that ambition is doomed to run up against an unbridgeable gulf between Husserl’s approach and that of Kant. I raise a number of doubts about Ricoeur’s reading of Husserl. After a preliminary section introducing Husserl’s understanding of his phenomenological project in relation to the work of Kant, I sketch the main lines of his analysis of time-consciousness, and then (...)
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  37. J. Cibulka (1998). Die Zirkelstruktur und der Zeitaspekt der Erfahrung: ueber die Gegenseitige Angewiesenheit der Husserl'schen und der Heidegger'schen Phaenomenologie. Analecta Husserliana 59:433-440.
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  38. David Clarke (2011). Music, Phenomenology, Time Consciousness: Meditations After Husserl. In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 1.
    David Clarke examines the complex relationship between phenomenological and semiological understandings of music and consciousness through the window of time. He also explores the polar tension between Husserl's phenomenology and Derrida's critique of it, considering what the experience of music might have to offer in response to the crucial question of what is most primordial or essential to consciousness: the unceasing, differential movement of meaning, or some pure flow of subjectivity that underpins all our experience.
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  39. Richard M. Cobb-Stevens (1998). James and Husserl: Time-Consciousness and the Intentionality of Presence and Absence. In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Self-Awareness, Temporality, and Alterity. Dordrecht: Kluwer.
  40. Joseph Cohen (2012). Levinas and the Problem of Phenomenology. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (3):363-374.
    The following essay seeks to deploy, from Husserl to Levinas, the centrality of the problem of temporality. In truth, the understanding of temporality constitutes, properly said, that which identifies and differentiates all the authors of the phenomenological tradition. Which means: temporality is that from which all phenomenological breakthroughs are signified and given their very possibility. Our task is thus, through a reading of Husserl, Heidegger and Levinas, to reveal how temporality is reassessed in the history of phenomenology as well as (...)
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  41. Time Consciousness (1992). Husserlian Foundations of Sartre's Treatment of Time Consciousness. In D. P. Chattopadhyaya, Lester E. Embree & Jitendranath Mohanty (eds.), Phenomenology and Indian Philosophy. Indian Council of Philosophical Research in Association with Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. 126.
  42. V. Costa (1992). Experience and Phenomenology of Time-Augustine and Husserl, Edmund. Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 21 (4):453-474.
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  43. Suzanne Cunningham (1985). Miller, Izchak. 'Husserl, Perception and Temporal Awareness'. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 38 (3):665-666.
  44. Barry F. Dainton (2003). Time in Experience: Reply to Gallagher. Psyche 9 (12).
    Consciousness exists in time, but time is also to be found within consciousness: we are directly aware of both persistence and change, at least over short intervals. On reflection this can seem baffling. How is it possible for us to be immediately aware of phenomena which are not (strictly speaking) present? What must consciousness be like for this to be possible? In "Stream of Consciousness" I argued that influential accounts of phenomenal temporality along the lines developed by Broad and Husserl (...)
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  45. Françoise Dastur (2000). Telling Time: Sketch of a Phenomenological Chronology. Althone Press.
    Telling Time takes up Heidegger's ideas of a "phenomenological chronology" in an attempt to pose the question of the possibility of a phenomenological language that would be given over to the "temporality of being" and the finitude of existence. The book combines a discussion of approaches to language in the philosophical tradition with readings of Husserl on temporality and the early and late texts of Heidegger's on logic, truth and the nature of language. As well as Heidegger's "deconstruction" of logic (...)
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  46. Francesco Paolo De Sanctis (2008). Le problème du temps chez Michel Henry: L'origine de l'espacement. Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique (1).
    Le problème du temps chez Michel Henry n’a pas encore fait l’objet d’une étude séparée. Le rejet abrupt de cette question chez l’auteur n’a certainement pas favorisé l’intérêt des critiques pour ce sujet. Dans un premier temps, en 1963 dans L’Essence de la manifestation , Michel Henry considère le problème du temps (à travers le filtre du Kantbuch de Heidegger) comme étant le « même » que celui de la récepti­vité, soit en le renvoyant à l’auto-affection. Celle-ci étant comprise comme (...)
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  47. Nicolas de Warren (2010). The Inner Night: Towards a Phenomenology of (Dreamless) Sleep. In Dieter Lohmar & Ichiro Yamaguchi (eds.), On Time: New Contributions to the Husserlian Problem of Time-Consciousness. Springer.
    Is a phenomenology of sleep possible? If sleep is the complete absence of experience, including the self-experience of consciousness itself, how can phenomenology, as a description of lived experience, have access to a condition that is neither lived nor experienced? In this paper, I respond directly and indirectly to Jean-Luc Nancy’s challenge that a phenomenology of sleep is impossible. As an indirect response, my sketch of the contours of phenomenology of sleep investigates Husserl’s employment of the distinction between sleep and (...)
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  48. Nicolas de Warren (2009). Husserl and the Promise of Time: Subjectivity in Transcendental Phenomenology. Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction : The promise of time : subjectivity in Husserl's transcendental phenomenology -- The ritual of clarification -- A rehersal of difficulties -- The ghosts of Brentano-- The retention of time past -- The impossible puzzle -- The lives of Others -- The life of consciousness.
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