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  1. Joseph Becker (1993). The Essential Nature of the Method of the Natural Sciences: Response to A. T. Nuyen's "Truth, Method, and Objectivity: Husserl and Gadamer on Scientific Method&Quot;. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (1):73-76.
  2. Darrin W. Belousek (1998). Husserl on Scientific Method and Conceptual Change: A Realist Appraisal. Synthese 115 (1):71-98.
    Husserl claimed that all theoretical scientific concepts originate in and are valid in reference to 'life-world' experience and that scientific traditions preserve the sense and validity of such concepts through unitary and cumulative change. Each of these claims will, in turn, be sympathetically laid out and assessed in comparison with more standard characterizations of scientific method and conceptual change as well as the history of physics, concerning particularly the challenge they may pose for scientific realism. The Husserlian phenomenological framework is (...)
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  3. Daniel Bischur (2011). Animated Bodies in Immunological Practices: Craftsmanship, Embodied Knowledge, Emotions and Attitudes Toward Animals. [REVIEW] Human Studies 34 (4):407-429.
    Taking up the body turn in sociology, this paper discusses scientific practices as embodied action from the perspective of Husserl’s phenomenological theory of the “Body”. Based on ethnographic data on a biology laboratory it will discuss the importance of the scientist’s Body for the performance of scientific activities. Successful researchers have to be skilled workers using their embodied knowledge for the process of tinkering towards the material transformation of their objects for data production. The researcher’s body then is an instrument (...)
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  4. Lawrence E. Cahoone (1986). The Interpretation of Galilean Science: Cassirer Contrasted with Husserl and Heidegger. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 17 (1):1-21.
  5. Robert D'Amico (1981). Husserl on the Foundational Structures of Natural and Cultural Sciences. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (1):5-22.
  6. James W. Garrison (1986). Husserl, Galileo, and the Processes of Idealization. Synthese 66 (2):329 - 338.
    This essay is concerned with the processes of idealization as described by Husserl in his last work, "The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology". Central as the processes of idealization are to Husserl's reflections on the origin of natural scientific knowledge and his attempt to reground that knowledge in the "forgotten meaning-fundament of natural science," they have not always been well understood. One reason for this is the lack of concrete historical examples. The main purpose of this paper is (...)
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  7. Gary Gutting (1978). Husserl and Scientific Realism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 39 (1):42-56.
    THE GOAL OF THIS PAPER IS TO DEFEND SCIENTIFIC REALISM (OF\nTHE SORT PROPOSED BY WILFRID SELLARS) AGAINST THE ATTACK ON\nIT IMPLICIT IN HUSSERL'S "CRISIS". IN PARTICULAR, I DISCUSS\nTHREE ANTI-REALIST HUSSERLIAN THESES: (1) THAT THE METHOD\nOF SCIENCE IS IN ESSENCE ONE OF THE IDEALIZATION; (2) THAT\nALL SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS CAN BE TRACED BACK TO OUR\nLIFE-WORLD EXPERIENCE; (3) THAT ANY SCIENTIFIC DESCRIPTION\nOF THE WORLD NECESSARILY OMITS MAJOR DIMENSIONS OF OUR\nLIFE-WORLD EXPERIENCES. I ARGUE THAT EACH OF THESE THESES\nIS INCONSISTENT WITH A CORRECT UNDERSTANDING OF (...)
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  8. Charles W. Harvey (1986). Husserl and the Problem of Theoretical Entities. Synthese 66 (2):291 - 309.
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  9. Patrick A. Heelan (2003). Husserl, Lonergan, and Paradoxes of Measurement. Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 3.
    My scientific field is theoretical physics. My philosophical orientation is phenomenology, especially hermeneutical phenomenology, as modified and extended under the influence of Bernard Lonergan's cognitional theory. In fact, I was already deeply under the influence of Bernard Lonergan's workbefore I went to Louvain/Leuven to study phenomenology as a propaedeutic to my preparation in the philosophy of science. The specific topic of this paper is one close to the center of Philip's interest, namely, to articulate the right balance among theory, experiment, (...)
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  10. Patrick A. Heelan (1991). Charles W. Harvey: 'Husserl’s Phenomenology and the Foundations of Natural Science'. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 8 (1).
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  11. Patrick A. Heelan (1987). Husserl's Later Philosophy of Natural Science. Philosophy of Science 54 (3):368-390.
    Husserl argues in the Crisis that the prevalent tradition of positive science in his time had a philosophical core, called by him "Galilean science", that mistook the quest for objective theory with the quest for truth. Husserl is here referring to Gottingen science of the Golden Years. For Husserl, theory "grows" out of the "soil" of the prescientific, that is, pretheoretical, life-world. Scientific truth finally is to be sought not in theory but rather in the pragmatic-perceptual praxes of measurement. Husserl (...)
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  12. David Hemmendinger (1975). Husserl's Concepts of Evidence and Science. The Monist 59 (1):81-97.
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  13. Juha Himanka (2005). Husserl's Argumentation for the Pre-Copernican View of the Earth. Review of Metaphysics 58 (3):621 - 644.
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  14. Burt C. Hopkins (2003). Crisis, History, and Husserl's Phenomenological Project of Desedimenting the Formalization of Meaning. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 24 (1):75-102.
  15. Masaki Hrada (2008). Revision of Phenomenology for Mathematical Physics. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 43:73-80.
    Fundamental notions Husserl introduced in Ideen I, such as epochè, reality, and empty X as substrate, might be useful for elucidating how mathematical physics concepts are produced. However, this is obscured in the context of Husserl’s phenomenology itself. For this possibility, the author modifies Husserl’s fundamental notions introduced for pure phenomenology, which found all sciences on the absolute Ego. Subsequently, the author displaces Husserl's phenomenological notions toward the notions operating inside scientific activities themselves and shows this using a case study (...)
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  16. Edmund Husserl, The Crisis of European Sciences.
  17. Edmund Husserl (1970). The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology. Evanston,Northwestern University Press.
    In this book, which remained unfinished at his death, Husserl attempts to forge a union between phenomenology and existentialism.
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  18. David Hyder (2003). Foucault, Cavaillès, and Husserl on the Historical Epistemology of the Sciences. Perspectives on Science 11 (1):107-129.
    : This paper discusses the origins of two key notions in Foucault's work up to and including The Archaeology of Knowledge. The first of these notions is the notion of "archaeology" itself, a form of historical investigation of knowledge that is distinguished from the mere history of ideas in part by its unearthing what Foucault calls "historical a prioris". Both notions, I argue, are derived from Husserlian phenomenology. But both are modified by Foucault in the light of Jean Cavaillès's critique (...)
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  19. Carlo Ierna, Filip Mattens & Hanne Jacobs (eds.) (2010). Philosophy, Phenomenology, Sciences. Essays in Commemoration of Edmund Husserl. Springer.
    This volume is a broad anthology addressing many if not most major topics in phenomenology and philosophy in general: from foundational and methodological ...
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  20. Don Ihde (2011). Husserl's Galileo Needed a Telescope! Philosophy and Technology 24 (1):69-82.
    Husserl’s Crisis argues that early modern science, exemplified in Galileo, separates the Lifeworld from a world of science by forgetting its origins in bodily perception on the one side, and the practices which found the science on the other. This essay argues that, rather, by overemphasizing mathematization and underemphasizing instruments or technologies which mediate perception, Husserl creates the division he describes. Positively, through the embodied use of instruments science remains thoroughly immersed in the Lifeworld.
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  21. René Jagnow (2006). Edmund Husserl on the Applicability of Formal Geometry. In Emily Carson & Renate Huber (eds.), Intuition and the Axiomatic Method. Springer. 67--85.
    In this paper, I reconstruct Edmund Husserl's view on the relationship between formal inquiry and the life-world, using the example of formal geometry. I first outline Husserl's account of geometry and then argue that he believed that the applicability of formal geometry to intuitive space (the space of everyday-experience) guarantees the conceptual continuity between different notions of space.
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  22. Theodore Kisiel (1973). Dimensions of a Phenomenology of Science in Husserl and Young Dr Heidegger. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 4 (3):217-234.
  23. Jeff Kochan (2011). Husserl and the Phenomenology of Science. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 42 (3):467-471.
    This article critically reviews an outstanding collection of new essays addressing Edmund Husserl’s Crisis of European Sciences. In Science and the Life-World (Stanford, 2010), David Hyder and Hans-Jörg Rheinberger bring together an impressive range of first-rate philosophers and historians. The collection explicates key concepts in Husserl’s often obscure work, compares Husserl’s phenomenology of science to the parallel tradition of historical epistemology, and provocatively challenges Husserl’s views on science. The explications are uniformly clear and helpful, the comparative work intriguing, and the (...)
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  24. Erazim Kohák (1985). Jan Patočka, Edmund Husserl's Philosophy of the Crisis of Science and His Conception of a Phenomenology of the “Life-World”. Husserl Studies 2 (2):129-155.
  25. Adam Konopka (2009). The Role of Umwelt in Husserl's Aufbau and Abbau of the Natur/Geist Distinction. Human Studies 32 (3):313 - 333.
    In this essay I argue that Husserl’s development of the nineteenth century Natur/Geist distinction is grounded in the intentional correlate between the pre-theoretical natural attitude and environing world ( Umwelt ). By reconsidering the Natur/Geist distinction through its historical context in the nineteenth century debate between Wilhelm Dilthey and the Neo-Kantians from the Baden or Southwest school, it is possible to understand more clearly Husserl’s appropriations and novel contributions. One of Husserl’s contributions lies in his rigorous thematization and clarification of (...)
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  26. K. Kuypers (1974). De idee Van filosofie AlS strenge wetenschap bij Husserl. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 36 (4):673 - 706.
    Die Forderung einer Philosophie als strenger Wissenschaft, von Husserl zum ersten Mal in dem bekannten Logosaufsatz erhoben, richtet sich nicht, wie meistens gedacht und auch von Dilthey selbst so verstanden ist, gegen den Historizismus von Dilthey, sondern vielmehr gegen dessen Identifizierung von Philosophie mit Weltanschauungsphilosophie und damit mit Weisheitslehre. Husserl hat vom Anfang an bis zum Ende seines Lebens sich der Herausarbeitung dieer Idee gewidmet und die Phänomenologie als Verwirklichung dieser Idee betrachtet. Dementsprechend soll man auch der geläufigen Auffassung zuwider (...)
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  27. Andrew W. Lamb (2002). No Longer the Cave of History. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (1):41-62.
    This essay argues against David Carr’s relativism by clarifying the in principle requirements appropriate to non-relative truths and showing that de facto differences of conceptual frameworks threaten none of them. Non-relative truths are not threatened by history. This defense of non-relative truth belongs to a larger defense of Husserlian “science” that shows how essences, even those “delivered” by history, have a universal (non-relative) “governance” and can be affirmed in nonrelative truths-as such science requires. If history also allows the other qualities (...)
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  28. Leonard Lawlor (2002). Verflechtung: The Triple Significance of Merleau-Ponty’s Course Notes on Husserl’s 'The Origin of Geometry'. In , Maurice Merleau-ponty: Husserl at the limits of phenomenology. Northwestern University Press.
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  29. Brian Lightbody (2009). Charting the Future Course for a Truly Humanistic Science: Husserl, the Epoche, and the Life-World. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism (A Journal of the American Humanist Association) 17 (1):61-71.
  30. Glenn McGee (2001). Dewey and Husserl on Natural Science and Values: Learning From the Sokal Debate. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 14 (4):286-299.
  31. Christian Möckel (2005). Krisis der Wissenschaftlichen Kultur? Edmund Husserls Forderung nach „Besinnung". Cultura 2 (2):26-39.
    Phenomenological philosophizing is practiced out of a sense of responsibility for contemporary culture, which is experienced as existing in a profoundcrisis. The first part of this contribution contains a systematization of the theory of crisis, a theory developed in many of Husserl's works: the description of the main phenomena of the consciousness of crisis, the explanation of crisis with regard to its causes, and the demands raised in order to overcome the crisis of scientific culture (»reflection«). Husserl's teachings on crisis (...)
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  32. Matthew Morgan (2009). Edmund Husserl and the Limitations of Biorobotic Research. Philosophical Forum 40 (3):411-424.
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  33. Thomas Mormann (1991). Husserl's Philosophy of Science and the Semantic Approach. Philosophy of Science 58 (1):61-83.
    Husserl's mathematical philosophy of science can be considered an anticipation of the contemporary postpositivistic semantic approach, which regards mathematics and not logic as the appropriate tool for the exact philosophical reconstruction of scientific theories. According to Husserl, an essential part of a theory's reconstruction is the mathematical description of its domain, that is, the world (or the part of the world) the theory intends to talk about. Contrary to the traditional micrological approach favored by the members of the Vienna Circle, (...)
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  34. A. T. Nuyen (1990). Truth, Method, and Objectivity Husserl and Gadamer on Scientific Method. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 20 (4):437-452.
    There is a common concern in some of the writings of Husserl and Gadamer. It is the concern to defend the legitimacy and dignity of the "human sciences." They argue from the methodological standpoint that the method of the natural sciences leaves out the relationship between the object of inquiry and the inquirer. This relationship plays a key role in "understanding," which is the concem of the human sciences. In explicating it, Husserl and Gadamer stress the role of the community (...)
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  35. John O'Neill (1988). Marcuse, Husserl and the Crisis of the Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (3):327-342.
  36. Matthew Ratcliffe (2013). Phenomenology, Naturalism and the Sense of Reality. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:67-88.
    Phenomenologists such as Husserl, Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty reject the kind of scientific naturalism or that takes empirical science to be epistemologically and metaphysically privileged over all other forms of enquiry. In this paper, I will consider one of their principal complaints against naturalism, that scientific accounts of things are oblivious to a that is presupposed by the intelligibility of science. Focusing mostly upon Husserl's work, I attempt to clarify the nature of this complaint and state it in the form of (...)
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  37. Jarosław Rolewski (2013). Husserl's Philosophy of Science. Dialogue and Universalism 23 (2):145-160.
    The paper presents Husserl’s conception of the relation between science and the living world (Lebenswelt), i.e. the world of everyday experience and communication. In Husserl view, science, or, more precisely, its basic aprioric structure is founded on the primal, essential core of the living world (a priori) from which it obtains its sense. Science (scientific a priori) modifies, idealizes, and mathematizes the primal aprioric Lebenswelt. Due to those operations scientific theories can represent empirical reality.
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  38. Guillermo Rosado Haddock (2012). Husserl's Conception of Physical Theories and Physical Geometry in the Time of the Prolegomena : A Comparison with Duhem's and Poincaré's Views. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 22 (1):171-193.
    This paper discusses Husserl’s views on physical theories in the first volume of his Logical Investigations , and compares them with those of his contemporaries Pierre Duhem and Henri Poincaré. Poincaré’s views serve as a bridge to a discussion of Husserl’s almost unknown views on physical geometry from about 1890 on, which in comparison even with Poincaré’s—not to say Frege’s—or almost any other philosopher of his time, represented a rupture with the philosophical tradition and were much more in tune with (...)
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  39. Lucia Ruggerone (2013). Science and Life-World: Husserl, Schutz, Garfinkel. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (2):179-197.
    In this article I intend to explore the conception of science as it emerges from the work of Husserl, Schutz, and Garfinkel. By concentrating specifically on the issue of science, I attempt to show that Garfinkel’s views on the relationship between science and the everyday world are much closer to Husserl’s stance than to the Schutzian perspective. To this end, I explore Husserl’s notion of science especially as it emerges in the Crisis of European Sciences, where he describes the failure (...)
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  40. Abraham Stone, On the Completion and Generalization of Intuitive Space in der Raum: Husserlian and Drieschian Elements.
    The paper focuses on some puzzles about Carnap's intended epistemological point in the "completion" and "generalization" of the Anschauungsraum in sec. II of Der Raum (leaving aside the technical problems which also arise). Since any global structure at all requires that eidetic intuition be supplemented with freely-chosen postulates and/or intuitively unmotivated generalizations, it is unclear, as several authors have pointed out, how and in what sense "intuitive space" as a whole represents a distinctive, a priori contribution to our knowledge. I (...)
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  41. E. Stroker & A. Giorgi (1999). The Husserlian Foundations of Science 2nd Ed. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 30 (1):122-124.
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  42. Elisabeth Ströker (1987). The Husserlian Foundations of Science. University Press of America.
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  43. Richard Tieszen (1993). Review of J. O'Neill, Worlds Without Content: Against Formalism. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 10 (3).
  44. Iulian D. Toader (2013). Concept Formation and Scientific Objectivity: Weyl's Turn Against Husserl. Hopos 3 (2):281-305.
    The idea that scientific objectivity requires a method of concept formation according to which concepts are freely created by the mind was famously propagated by Hermann Weyl. I argue that this idea, which he saw as essentially characterizing what physicists do when they do physics, led him to abandon the phenomenological view on objectivity, more particularly the strong connection between objectivity and evidence (understood in a Husserlian sense as a satisfaction of meaning intentions). The free creation of concepts, that is (...)
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  45. Shannon Vallor (2009). The Pregnancy of the Real: A Phenomenological Defense of Experimental Realism. Inquiry 52 (1):1 – 25.
    This paper develops a phenomenological defense of Ian Hacking's experimental realism about unobservable entities in physical science, employing historically undervalued resources from the phenomenological tradition in order to clarify the warrant for our ontological commitments in science. Building upon the work of Husserl, Merleau-Ponty and Heelan, the paper provides a phenomenological correction of the positivistic conception of perceptual evidence maintained by antirealists such as van Fraassen, the experimental relevance of which is illustrated through a phenomenological interpretation of the 1974 discovery (...)
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  46. Daniel Videla (1994). On the Narratives of Science: The Critique of Modernity in Husserl and Heidegger. [REVIEW] Human Studies 17 (2):189 - 202.
  47. Hans Wagner (1974). Husserl's Ambiguous Philosophy of Science. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):169-185.
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  48. Harald A. Wiltsche (2012). What is Wrong with Husserl's Scientific Anti-Realism? Inquiry 55 (2):105-130.
    Abstract Not much scholarly work is needed in order to stumble across many passages where Edmund Husserl seems to advocate an anti-realist attitude towards the natural sciences. This tendency, however, is not well-received within the secondary literature. While some commentators criticize Husserl for his alleged scientific anti-realism, others argue that Husserl's position is much more realist than the first impression indicates. It is against this background that I want to argue for the following theses: a) The basic outlook of Husserl's (...)
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  49. Jeffrey Yoshimi (2007). Mathematizing Phenomenology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (3):271-291.
    Husserl is well known for his critique of the “mathematizing tendencies” of modern science, and is particularly emphatic that mathematics and phenomenology are distinct and in some sense incompatible. But Husserl himself uses mathematical methods in phenomenology. In the first half of the paper I give a detailed analysis of this tension, showing how those Husserlian doctrines which seem to speak against application of mathematics to phenomenology do not in fact do so. In the second half of the paper I (...)
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  50. Shiying Zhang (2009). The Double Meanings of “Essence”: The Natural and Humane Sciences — a Tentative Linkage of Hegel, Dilthey, and Husserl. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):143-155.
    Early in Aristotle’s terminology, and ever since, “essence” has been conceived as having two meanings, namely “universality” and “individuality”. According to the tradition of thought that has dominated throughout the history of Western philosophy, “essence” unequivocally refers to “universality”. As a matter of fact, however, “universality” cannot cover Aristotle’s definition and formulation of “essence”: Essence is what makes a thing “happen to be this thing.” “Individuality” should be the deep meaning of “essence”. By means of an analysis of some relevant (...)
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