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  1. Flor Emilce Cely Á (2011). El yo como tema de análisis fenomenológico. Ideas Y Valores 60 (146):59-72.
    Husserl comenzó oponiéndose a la posibilidad de considerar el yo como centro de referencia esencial de los actos intencionales. Sin embargo, luego aceptó incluirlo en la descripción fenomenológica como centro de referencia de las vivencias intencionales. Se analizan esos dos momentos y se estudia su..
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  2. Lilian Alweiss (2009). The Bifurcated Subject. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (3):415 - 434.
    Michel Henry wishes to salvage Descartes?s first principle ?I think, I am? by claiming that there is no need to appeal to the world or others to make sense of the self. One of his main targets is Edmund Husserl, who claims that thought is necessarily intentional and thus necessarily about something that is other to thought. To show that this is not so, Henry draws on passages from Descartes?s texts which emphasize that we should not equate the cogito with (...)
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  3. Van Meter Ames (1955). Mead and Husserl on the Self. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 15 (3):320 - 331.
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  4. Wayne K. Andrew (1982). The Givenness of Self and Others in Husserl's Transcendental Phenomenology. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 13 (1):85-100.
    Husserl's explication of "self" and "others" occurs within his founding science of pure possibilities or "bracketed" consciousness and experience. His analysis of self and others seeks, in part, to demonstrate that "personal" or "self-experience" is not the only possibility of immanent consciousness but that "other persons" are also given as possibilities. The possibility of others, though in a form of givenness different from that of self, provides a basis for inter-subjectivity. Thus, Husserl's phenomenological analysis can, if it does avoid solipsism (...)
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  5. Christiane Bailey (2013). Le partage du monde: Husserl et la constitution des animaux comme "autres moi". Chiasmi International: Trilingual Studies Concerning Merleau-Ponty’s Thought 15:219-250.
    Alors que les phénoménologues prétendent avoir dépassé le solipsisme, la plupart n’ont en fait que repousser les frontières de l’intersubjectivité des individus humains aux individus des autres espèces. Pourtant, Husserl reconnaît l’existence d’une intersubjectivité interspécifique, c’est-à-dire d’une intersubjectivité dépassant les limites de l’espèce. Il va même jusqu’à affirmer qu’on comprend parfois mieux un animal familier qu’un humain étranger. Toutefois, même s’il admet que plusieurs animaux sont capables d’une vie de conscience subjective et qu’ils vivent dans un monde de sens partagé, (...)
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  6. Jocelyn Benoist (1995). Egología y Donación: Primera Aproximación a la Cuestión de la Presencia. Anuario Filosófico 28 (1):109-142.
    Husserl's theory of "transcendental ego" is often read as a metaphysical absolute idealism. The author attempts to fight this view and to give its phenomenological meaning to the "ego". It is the name of the "presence" the consciousness-life owns, beyond all metaphysical construction. So Husserl gives a new chance to egology, related to the frame of phenomenality itself. In this way a non-metaphysical re-reading of the cartesian cogito seems authorized.
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  7. Werner Bergmann & Gisbert Hoffmann (1989). Selbstreferenz Und Zeit: Die Dynamische Stabilität des Bewusstseins. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 6 (2):155-175.
    Dieser Beitrag stellt die Zeitlichkeit des Bewusstseins und ihre Folgeprobleme in einer neuen Perspektive vor, die sich aus der Verknüpfung der empirischen Theorie selbstreferentieller Systeme mit der transzendentalen Phänomenologie Edmund Husserls ergibt. -/- .
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  8. Christian Beyer (2012). 4 Husserl on Understanding Persons. In Christel Fricke & Dagfinn Føllesdal (eds.), Intersubjectivity and Objectivity in Adam Smith and Edmund Husserl. Ontos Verlag. 8--93.
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  9. Matt Bower (2014). Husserl’s Motivation and Method for Phenomenological Reconstruction. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (2):135-152.
    In this paper I piece present an account of Husserl’s approach to the phenomenological reconstruction of consciousness’ immemorial past, a problem, I suggest, that is quite pertinent for defenders of Lockean psychological continuity views of personal identity. To begin, I sketch the background of the problem facing the very project of a genetic phenomenology, within which the reconstructive analysis is situated. While the young Husserl took genetic matters to be irrelevant to the main task of phenomenology, he would later come (...)
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  10. Roland Breeur (2001). Bergson's and Sartre's Account of the Self in Relation to the Transcendental Ego. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (2):177 – 198.
    In The Transcendence of the Ego Sartre deals with the idea of the self and of its relation to what he calls 'pure consciousness'. Pure consciousness is an impersonal transcendental field, in which the self is produced in such a way that consciousness thereby disguises its 'monstrous spontaneity'. I want to explore to what extent the ego is to be understood as a result of absolute consciousness. I also claim that the idea of the self Sartre has in mind is (...)
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  11. David Carr (1999). The Paradox of Subjectivity: The Self in the Transcendental Tradition. Oxford University Press.
    Challenging prevailing interpretations of the development of modern philosophy, this book proposes a reinterpretation of the transcendental tradition, as represented primarily by Kant and Husserl, and counters Heidegger's influential reading of these philosophers. Author David Carr defends their subtle and complex transcendental investigations of the self and the life of subjectivity, and seeks to revive an understanding of what Husserl calls "the paradox of subjectivity"--an appreciation for the rich and sometimes contradictory character of experience.
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  12. Barry Dainton (2002). Book Review: The Subject in Question—Sartre's Critique of Husserl in the Transcendence of the Ego. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (442):473-478.
  13. Roberta De Monticelli (2011). Alles Leben ist Stellungnehmen - Die Person als praktisches Subjekt. In Verena Mayer, Christopher Erhard, Marisa Scherini & Uwe Meixner (eds.), Die Aktualität Husserls. Karl Alber.
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  14. Robert M. Doran (1967). Sartre's Critique of the Husserlian Ego. Modern Schoolman 44 (4):307-317.
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  15. Denis Fisette (1998). The Horizon of the Self: Husserl on Indexicals. In. In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Self-Awareness, Temporality, and Alterity. Dordrecht: Kluwer. 119--135.
    One of the questions raised by the conference’s topic, in particular the relationship between the self and the other, a matter much discussed since Merleau-Ponty’s death, is the question of husserlian phenomenology’s cartesianism. Some believe that despite his reservations towards cartesianism, Husserl never disavowed his commitment to the Cartesian program of a first philosophy.
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  16. Brian Harding (2005). Epoché, the Transcendental Ego, and Intersubjectivity in Husserl's Phenomenology. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:141-156.
    This essay is concerned with defending Husserl against the criticism that he is insuffi ciently attentive to intersubjectivity. It has two moments; the fi rst articulates what I take to be a general version of the critique and then turns to a discussion of a version derived from Wittgenstein’s private language argument and the ensuing debate regarding this critique between Suzanne Cunningham and Peter Hutcheson. This discussion concludes by noting a general agreement betweenthe two participants that Husserl’s ego is not (...)
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  17. James G. Hart (2006). The Absolute Ought and the Unique Individual. Husserl Studies 22 (3):223-240.
    The referent of the transcendental and indexical “I” is present non-ascriptively and contrasts with “the personal I” which necessity is presenced as having properties. Each is unique but in different ways. The former is abstract and incomplete until taken as a personal I. The personal I is ontologically incomplete until it self-determines itself morally. The “absolute Ought” is the exemplary moral self-determination and it finds a special disclosure in “the truth of will.” Simmel's situation ethics is useful for making more (...)
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  18. Sara Heinämaa (2012). The Self and the Others: Common Topics for Husserl and Wittgenstein. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (2):234-249.
    Several commentators have argued that Husserl's phenomenological project is compromised or even destroyed by Wittgenstein's critical inquiries into our use of psychological concepts. In contrast to oppositional interpretations, this paper explicates certain crucial connections between Husserl's phenomenology and Wittgenstein's late thinking—shared views that concern the embodied nature of selfhood and our relations to other selves. In line with certain recent contributions, I argue that there are important similarities between Husserl's analysis of these phenomena and Wittgenstein's remarks on our use of (...)
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  19. Burt Hopkins (2011). Volviendo a Husserl. Reactualizando el contexto filosófico tradicional del “problema” fenomenológico del otro. La Monadología de Leibniz. [REVIEW] Areté. Revista de Filosofía 23 (2):357-379.
    “Back to Husserl: Reclaiming the Traditional Philosophical Context ofthe Phenomenological ‘Problem’ of the Other: Leibniz’s Monadology”. The internalmotivation that led Husserl to revise his early view of the pure Ego as empty ofessential content is traced to the end of explicating his reformulation of phenomenologyas the egology of the concrete transcendental Ego. The necessity ofrecasting transcendental phenomenology as a transcendental idealism that followsfrom this reformulation is presented and the appearance of transcendentalsolipsism of this idealism exposed as unfounded. That the ground (...)
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  20. Fernando Infante Del Rosal (2013). Fiction in Edith Stein's Idea of Empathy. Ideas Y Valores 62 (153):137-155.
    RESUMEN En su primera investigación, Edith Stein se propuso definir la esencia de la Einfühlung (empatía) como experiencia de la conciencia ajena; pretendía así fundamentar que, como había indicado Husserl, ese acto abría la posibilidad de una intersubjetividad trascendental como solución al solipsismo de la conciencia. Stein halló la clave de esa esencia en la idea de originariedad, pero intentó evitar el problema de la empatía estética, sirviéndose de Los ídolos del autoconocimiento de Scheler. ABSTRACT In her first research project, (...)
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  21. Hanne Jacobs (2014). Transcendental Subjectivity and the Human Being. In Sara Heinämaa Mirja Hartimo & Timo Miettinen (eds.), Phenomenology and the Transcendental. Routledge. 87-105.
    This article addresses an ambiguity in Edmund Husserl’s descriptions of what it means to be a human being in the world. On the one hand, Husserl often characterizes the human being in natural scientific terms as a psychophysical unity. On the other hand, Husserl also describes how we experience ourselves as embodied persons that experience and communicate with others within a socio-historical world. The main aim of this article is to show that if one overlooks this ambiguity then one will (...)
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  22. Robert Welsh Jordan, Being and Time: Some Aspects of the Ego's Involvement in His Mental Life.
    The most obvious cases of ego-involvement in conscious life are those which Husserl calls conscious acts or cogitationes.[2] They are the most obvious cases because they are the ones in which the ego explicitly involves himself in some way ; they exhibit the character of being engaged in by the ego or having been engaged in by him. This ego-quality or character belongs demonstrably to every conscious process in which the ego engages or lives. In the ego's conscious life, the (...)
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  23. Ian Leask (2003). Husserl, Givenness, and the Priority of the Self. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 11 (2):141 – 156.
    This article argues that, despite its apparent radicality, Husserl's later, genetic phenomenology ends up confirming and consolidating a very orthodox transcendental egology.First, the article reconstructs an Husserlian phenomenology of givenness; but then, by considering the ambiguous role of intuition, it also establishes (a) the continued prestige of a 'classical' transcendental subject, and (b) the way in which a denial of ontology allows Husserl's transcendental subject to sublate the provocative challenge of primal Gegebenheit .Overall, the article argues that Husserl is subject (...)
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  24. Christian Lotz (2007). From Affectivity to Subjectivity: Husserl's Phenomenology Revisited. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Christian Lotz shows in this book that Husserl's Phenomenology and its key concept--subjectivity--is based on a concrete anthropological structure, such as self-affection and the bodily experience of the other. The analysis of the sensual sphere and the lived Body forces Husserl to an ongoing correction of his strong methodological assumptions. Subjectivity turns out to be an ambivalent phenomenon, as the subject is unable to fully present itself to itself, and therefore is forced to allow for a fundamental non-transparency in itself.
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  25. Sebastian Luft (2010). Das Subjekt als moralische Person. Zu Husserls späten Reflexionen bezüglich des Personenbegriffs. In Philippe Merz, Andrea Staiti & Frank Steffen (eds.), Geist-Person-Gemeinschaft: Freiburger Beiträge zur Aktualität Husserls. Ergon-Verlag GmbH.
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  26. Sebastian Luft (2005). Husserl's Concept of the 'Transcendental Person': Another Look at the Husserl-Heidegger Relationship. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (2):141 – 177.
    This paper offers a further look at Husserl's late thought on the transcendental subject and the Husserl-Heidegger relationship. It attempts a reconstruction of how Husserl hoped to assert his own thoughts on subjectivity vis-à-vis Heidegger, while also pointing out where Husserl did not reach the new level that Heidegger attained. In his late manuscripts, Husserl employs the term 'transcendental person' to describe the transcendental ego in its fullest 'concretion'. I maintain that although this concept is a consistent development of Husserl's (...)
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  27. Paul MacDonald (2007). Husserl, the Monad and Immortality. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (2).
    In an Appendix to his Analyses Concerning Passive and Active Synthesis dating from the early 1920s, Husserl makes the startling assertion that, unlike the mundane ego, the transcendental ego is immortal. The present paper argues that this claim is an ineluctable consequence of Husserl’s relentless pursuit of the ever deeper levels of time-constituting consciousness and, at the same time, of his increasing reliance on Leibniz’s model of monads as the true unifiers of all things, including minds. There are many structural (...)
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  28. Eduard Marbach (2000). The Place for an Ego in Current Research. In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Exploring the Self: Philosophical and Psychopathological Perspectives on Self-Experience. John Benjamins.
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  29. Darian Meacham (2013). What Goes Without Saying: Husserl's Concept of Style. Research in Phenomenology 43 (1):3-26.
    The idea of “style” emerges at several important points throughout Husserl’s oeuvre: in the second part of the Crisis of the European Sciences, the lectures on intersubjectivity published in Husserliana XV, and in the analyses of transcendental character and intersubjectivity in the second book of the Ideas. This paper argues that the idea of style, often overlooked, is in fact central to understanding Husserl’s conception of the person and intersubjective relations, its role in the latter captured in his odd turn (...)
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  30. Angel Medina (1971). Husserl on the Nature of the Subject. New Scholasticism 45 (4):547-572.
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  31. Ullrich Melle (2007). Husserl's Personalist Ethics. Husserl Studies 23 (1):1-15.
    The point of departure of any ethical theory is the anthropological fact that normally developed humans must lead their own lives themselves. This means that their conduct is neither programmed nor determined by instincts. Human beings must on every occasion engage the circumstances of a practical situation by their own choice and decision. Even when they find themselves delivered over to the stimuli and powers of particular circumstances in a completely passive manner, this does not occur in the way that (...)
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  32. James Mensch, Postmodern Phenomenology.
    How would we conceive a phenomenology that has been purified by a post-modern critique? Although the term “post-modernism” names an extremely varied phenomenon, two features seem especially relevant. The first is its distrust of meta-narratives or overarching accounts of the way things are. The second, which is closely related to this, is the deconstruction of the subject. By this is meant not just the deconstruction of the “author”—i.e., the undermining the notion of his/her subjective intentions as setting the parameters of (...)
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  33. James Mensch (2005). Manifestation and the Paradox of Subjectivity. Husserl Studies 21 (1):35-53.
    The question of who we are is a perennial one in philosophy. It is particularly acute in transcendental philosophy with its focus on the subject. In its attempt to see in the subject the structures and activities that determine experience, such philosophy confronts what Husserl called “the paradox of human subjectivity.” This is the paradox of its two-fold being. It has “both the being of a subject for the world and the being of an object in the world.” As the (...)
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  34. James R. Mensch (2009). The Phenomenological Status of the Ego. Idealistic Studies 39 (1/3):1-9.
    For phenomenology, the study of appearances and the ways they come together to present a world, the question of the ego presents special difficulties. The ego, itself, is not an appearance; it is the subject to whom appearances appear. As such, it cannot appear. As the neo-Kantian, Paul Natorp expresses this:“The ego is the subjective center of relation for all contents in my consciousness. . . . It cannot itself be a content and resembles nothing that could be a content (...)
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  35. James R. Mensch (1997). Freedom and Selfhood. Husserl Studies 14 (1):41-59.
    Freedom is a perennial topic of philosophy. It is also one of themost puzzling. Regarding it, we are tempted to say with Augustine, “I know well enough what it is, provided that nobody asks me.” 1 We can all sense its presence.We use the word constantly, yet an account of it seems to elude us.My purpose in this paper is to see if phenomenology can provide such an account, one that includes in its description the features philosophers ascribe to freedom. (...)
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  36. Stefano Micali (2008). Überschüsse der Erfahrung: Grenzdimensionen des Ich Nach Husserl. Springer.
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  37. Izchak Miller (1986). Husserl and Sartre on the Self. The Monist 69 (4):534-545.
  38. Enrique Muñoz (2012). Fuentes fenomenológicas de la noción de persona: su discusión en Husserl, Scheler y Heidegger. Areté. Revista de Filosofía 24 (1):91-108.
    “Phenomenological Sources for the Concept of Person: their Discussion in the Works of Husserl, Scheler and Heidegger”. The article sets out to reconstruct the arguments that are developed by Heidegger on the concept of the person in some passages of § 10 of Being and Time . In those brief passages, Heidegger comments positively on the concept of the person as elucidated by Husserl and Scheler in the framework of the phenomenological movement. Consequently, in the article, I focus on identifying (...)
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  39. Yasuhiko Murakami (2010). Affection, Autism and Mental Disorders: Husserl's Theory of Meaning and Psychopathology. Studia Phaenomenologica 10:193-204.
    Behind the phase of cognition analysed by Husserl, there is a phase of affection. In this phase, there are significant mental disorders occurring. Similar to the way in which the phase of cognition is divided into reference, meaning (referent), and representation of words (classification according to Husserl's theory of meaning), the phase of affection is also divided into reference, “meaning,” and figure as sphere of “meaning”. The situation as a reference can allow various predications to form different explanations, i.e. different (...)
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  40. Tom Nenon (2002). Freedom, Responsibility, and Self-Awareness in Husserl. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 2 (1):1-21.
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  41. William M. O'Meara (1986). The Social Nature of Self and Morality for Husserl, Schutz, Marx, and Mead. Philosophy Research Archives 12:329-355.
    The purpose of the paper is, first, to describe how Husserl’s phenomenology begins with the transcendental ego and attempts to affirm by necessary insight the alter ego and the moral community of all rational beings, and, secondly, to evaluate this argument, using the thought of Schutz, Marx, and Mead. The paper concludes that Husserl’s and Schutz’s concepts of the social nature of the self are inadequate and that Marx and Mead offer a better analysis of how the social nature of (...)
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  42. John K. O.’Connor (2007). Anti-Psychologism and the Path Beyond Reductive Egology in Husserl. Philosophy Today 51 (Supplement):14-22.
  43. George E. Oberlander (1973). The Transcendental Self in Husserl's Phenomenology: Some Suggested Revisions. Research in Phenomenology 3 (1):45-62.
  44. Søren Overgaard (2009). S. Taguchi, Das Problem Des 'Ur-Ich' Bei Edmund Husserl: Die Frage Nach der Selbstverständlichen 'Nähe' Des Selbst. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 25 (1):89-95.
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  45. Stephen Priest (2000). The Subject in Question: Sartre's Critique of Husserl in the Transcendence of the Ego. Routledge.
    The Subject in Question provides a fascinating insight into a debate between two of the twentieth century's most famous philosophers over the key notions of conscious experience and the self. Edmund Husserl, the father of phenomenology, argued that the unity of one's own consciousness depends on the "transcendental ego," an irreducible, essential self not available to ordinary consciousness. But in The Transcendence of the Ego , Jean-Paul Sartre launched a sustained attack on Husserl's doctrine and argued that the self is (...)
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  46. Tetsuya Sakakibara (1997). Das Problem Des Ich Und der Ursprung der Genetischen Phänemologie Bei Husserl. Husserl Studies 14 (1):21-39.
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  47. Jean-Paul Sartre (2004). The Transcendence of the Ego: A Sketch for a Phenomenological Description. Routledge.
    First published in France in 1936 as a journal article, The Transcendence of the Ego was one of Jean-Paul Sartre's earliest philosophical publications. When it appeared, Sartre was still largely unknown, working as a school teacher in provincial France and struggling to find a publisher for his most famous fictional work, Nausea . The Transcendence of the Ego is the outcome of Sartre's intense engagement with the philosophy of Edmund Husserl, the founder of phenomenology. Here, as in many subsequent writings, (...)
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  48. Josef Seifert (1970). „Kritik am Relativismus und Immanentismus in E. Husserls. Cartesianischen Meditationen'. Die Äquivokationen im Ausdruck. transzendentales ego'an der Basis jedes transzendentalen Idealismus. [REVIEW] Salzburger Jahrbuch für Philosophie 14:85-109.
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  49. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (2006). Essential Clarifications of 'Self-Affection' and Husserl's 'Sphere of Ownness': First Steps Toward a Pure Phenomenology of (Human) Nature. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 39 (4):361-391.
    This article begins with a critical discussion of the commonly used phenomenological term “self-affection,” showing how the term is problematic. It proceeds to clarify obscurities and other impediments in current usage of the term through initial analyses of experience and to single out a transcendental clue found in Husserl’s descriptive remarks on wakeful world-consciousness, a clue leading to a basic phenomenological truth of wakeful human life. The truth centers on temporality and movement, and on animation. The three detailed investigations that (...)
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  50. E. Shmueli (1970). Husserl's "Transcendental Subjectivity" and His Existential Opponents. Telos 1970 (6):274-286.
    At first glance it seems to be merely a curious accident that existentialist philosophers, like Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Sartre should relate to Husserl's phenomenology as Kierkegaard on the one hand, and Feuerbach and Marx on the other related to Hegel. The latter argued that since the cognitive I is merely a concrete real being, it cannot transcend its spacio-temporal existence and look at the world from the perspective of the absolute Being or God. Neither can human consciousness reveal in itself (...)
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