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  1. Scott F. Aiken (2009). The Significance of Al Gore's Purported Hypocrisy. Environmental Ethics 31 (1):111-112.
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  2. Scott F. Aikin, What is the Significance of Al Gore's Purported Hypocrisy?
    This paper is a survey of a variety of hypocrisy charges levied against Al Gore. Understood properly, these hypocrisy charges actually support Gore's case.
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  3. Scott F. Aikin (2008). Tu Quoque Arguments and the Significance of Hypocrisy. Informal Logic 28 (2):155-169.
    Though textbook tu quoque arguments are fallacies of relevance, many versions of arguments from hypocrisy are indirectly relevant to the issue. Some arguments from hypocrisy are challenges to the authority of a speaker on the basis of either her sincerity or competency regarding the issue. Other arguments from hypocrisy purport to be evidence of the impracticability of the opponent’s proposals. Further, some versions of hypocrisy charges from impracticability are open to a counter that I will term tu quoque judo.
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  4. Mark Alicke, Ellen Gordon & David Rose (2012). Hypocrisy: What Counts? Philosophical Psychology (5):1-29.
    Hypocrisy is a multi-faceted concept that has been studied empirically by psychologists and discussed logically by philosophers. In this study, we pose various behavioral scenarios to research participants and ask them to indicate whether the actor in the scenario behaved hypocritically. We assess many of the components that have been considered to be necessary for hypocrisy (e.g., the intent to deceive, self-deception), factors that may or may not be distinguished from hypocrisy (e.g., weakness of will), and factors that may moderate (...)
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  5. Cathryn Bailey (2007). "Africa Begins at the Pyrenees": Moral Outrage, Hypocrisy, and the Spanish Bullfight. Ethics and the Environment 12 (1):23-38.
    : The long history of criticism directed at bullfighting usually suggests that there is something especially morally noxious about it. I analyze the claims that bullfighting is distinctively immoral, comparing it to more widely accepted practices such as the slaughtering of animals for food. I conclude that, while bullfighting is horrific, the emphasis on it as especially "uncivilized" may serve to disguise the similarities that it has with other practices that also depend on animal suffering. I conclude that, for many, (...)
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  6. C. Daniel Batson, Elizabeth Collins & Adam A. Powell (2006). Doing Business After the Fall: The Virtue of Moral Hypocrisy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 66 (4):321 - 335.
    Moral hypocrisy is motivation to appear moral yet, if possible, avoid the cost of actually being moral. In business, moral hypocrisy allows one to engender trust, solve the commitment problem, and still relentlessly pursue personal gain. Indicating the power of this motive, research has provided clear and consistent evidence that, given the opportunity, many people act to appear fair (e.g., they flip a coin to distribute resources between themselves and another person) without actually being fair (they accept the flip only (...)
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  7. William J. Bouwsma (1987). Calvin and the Dilemma of Hypocrisy. In Peter De Klerk (ed.), Calvin and Christian Ethics: Papers and Responses Presented at the Fifth Colloquium on Calvin & Calvin Studies Sponsored by the Calvin Studies Society Held at the Calvin Theological Seminary, Grand Rapids, Michigan, on May 8 and 9, 1985. Calvin Studies Society.
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  8. Keith Burgess‐Jackson (1997). Trite Arguments and Hypocrisy: A Rejoinder. Criminal Justice Ethics 16 (2):8-10.
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  9. Shane D. Drefcinski (2003). Is Hypocrisy Always a Vice? Logos 6 (1).
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  10. Dorothy Foote (2001). The Question of Ethical Hypocrisy in Human Resource Management in the U.K. And Irish Charity Sectors. Journal of Business Ethics 34 (1):25 - 38.
    Whilst there is a growing volume of literature exploring the ethical implications of organisational change for HRM and the ethical aspects of certain HRM activities, there have been few published U.K. studies of how HR managers actually behave when faced with ethical dilemmas in their work. This paper seeks to enhance the foundations of such knowledge through an examination of the influence of organisational values on the ethical behaviour of Human Resource Managers within a sample of charities in the U.K. (...)
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  11. R. Z. Friedman (1986). Hypocrisy and the Highest Good: Hegel on Kant's Transition From Morality to Religion. Journal of the History of Philosophy 24 (4):503-522.
  12. Benjamin Ginzburg (1922). Hypocrisy as a Pathological Symptom. International Journal of Ethics 32 (2):160-166.
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  13. Ruth Weissbourd Grant (1997). Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau, and the Ethics of Politics. University of Chicago Press.
    Questioning the usual judgements of political ethics, Ruth W. Grant argues that hypocrisy can actually be constructive while strictly principled behavior can be destructive. Hypocrisy and Integrity offers a new conceptual framework that clarifies the differences between idealism and fanaticism while it uncovers the moral limits of compromise. "Exciting and provocative. . . . Grant's work is to be highly recommended, offering a fresh reading of Rousseau and Machiavelli as well as presenting a penetrating analysis of hypocrisy and integrity."--Ronald J. (...)
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  14. Eva Feder Kittay (1982). On Hypocrisy. Metaphilosophy 13 (3-4):277-289.
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  15. Hans Maes (2004). Modesty, Asymmetry, and Hypocrisy. Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (4):485-497.
  16. Christine McKinnon (2006). Hypocrisy: Ethical Investigations Béla Szabados and Eldon Soifer Peterborough, ON: Broadview Press, 2004, 352 Pp., $25.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 45 (02):395-.
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  17. Christine McKinnon (2006). Hypocrisy: Ethical Lnvestigations. Dialogue 45 (2):395-398.
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  18. Christine Mckinnon (2005). Hypocrisy, Cheating, and Character Possession. Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (3-4):399-414.
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  19. Christine McKinnon (2002). Hypocrisy and the Good of Character Possession. Dialogue 41 (04):715-.
    L'hypocrisie implique un souci de la réputation morale qui conduit à des contradictions entre les actions et les raisons d'agir qui sont ouvertement déclarées,ou entre les raisons d'agir réelles et celles qui sont ouvertement déclarées. On opposera ici les actions hypocrites aux actions velléitaires, et les personnes hypocrites aux personnes velléitaires. Les rapports entre l'intégrité et l'hypocrisie seront esquissés : ce qui distingue la personne intègre et l'hypocrite, ce sont leurs attitudes respectives à l'endroit de leurs raisons d'agir; cela ouvre (...)
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  20. John M. Meyer (2011). Hypocrisy, NIMBY, and the Politics of Everybody's Backyard. Ethics, Policy and Environment 13 (3):325-327.
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  21. John Mitchell (1975). Adolescent Hypocrisy. Journal of Moral Education 5 (1):19-23.
    Abstract: It is argued that adolescence is a developmental phase which is especially prone to certain forms of hypocrisy, and that though the adolescent can be very perceptive of the hypocrisy of adults he is usually blind to his own. To a large extent adolescent hypocrisy is a function of those expectations of adults and peers which conflict with the adolescent's own feelings and desires. Several different forms of adolescent hypocrisy are distinguished and the factors which induce them are described. (...)
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  22. Ronald C. Naso (2010). Hypocrisy Unmasked: Dissociation, Shame, and the Ethics of Inauthenticity. Jason Aronson.
    The paradox of hypocrisy -- The call of conscience -- Perversion and moral reckoning -- Compromises of integrity -- Beneath the mask -- Youthful indiscretions -- Dissociation as self-deception -- Multiplicity and moral ambiguity.
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  23. Lawrence Quill (2010). Political Hypocrisy and the Role of Professionals. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):197-210.
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  24. William H. Shaw (1999). Is Hypocrisy a Problem for Consequentialism? Utilitas 11 (03):340-.
    Eldon Soifer and Béla Szabados argue that hypocrisy poses a problem for consequentialism because the hypocrite, in pretending to live up to a norm he or she does not really accept, acts in ways that have good results. They argue, however, that consequentialists can meet this challenge and show the wrongness of hypocrisy by adopting a desirefulfilment version of their theory. This essay raises some doubts about Soifer and Szabados's proposal and argues that consequentialism has no difficulty coming to grips (...)
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  25. Eldon Soifer (1999). Hypocrisy and Integrity: Machiavelli, Rousseau, and the Ethics of Politics Ruth W. Grant Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1997, Xii + 201 Pp., $22.50 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (03):671-.
  26. Eldon Soifer & Béla Szabados (1998). Hypocrisy and Consequentialism. Utilitas 10 (02):168-.
    Consequentialism has trouble explaining why hypocrisy is a term of moral condem-nation, largely because hypocrites often try to deceive others about their own selfishness through the useof words or deeds which themselves have good consequences. We argue that consequentialist attempts to deal with the problem by separating the evaluation of agent and action, or by the directevaluation of dispositions, or by focusing on long-term consequences such as reliability and erosion of trust, all prove inadequate to the challenge. We go on (...)
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  27. Daniel Statman (1997). Hypocrisy and Self-Deception. Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):57-75.
    Hypocrites are generally regarded as morally-corrupt, cynical egoists who consciously and deliberately deceive others in order to further their own interests. The purpose of my essay is to present a different view. I argue that hypocrisy typically involves or leads to self-deception and, therefore, that real hypocrites are hard to find. One reason for this merging of hypocrisy into self-deception is that a consistent and conscious deception of society is self-defeating from the point of view of egoistical hypocrites. The best (...)
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  28. Bela Szabados & Eldon Soifer (1999). Hypocrisy, Change of Mind, and Weakness of Will: How to Do Moral Philosophy with Examples. Metaphilosophy 30 (1&2):60-78.
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  29. Béla Szabados & Eldon Soifer (1998). Hypocrisy After Aristotle. Dialogue 37 (03):545-.
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  30. James Tooley (2007). From Adam Swift to Adam Smith: How the ‘Invisible Hand’ Overcomes Middle Class Hypocrisy. Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):727–741.
  31. A. S. Tsipko (1993). Intellectual Hypocrisy of the “Orthodoxes” or a Long Way to Common Sense. Studies in East European Thought 45 (1-2):89 - 101.
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  32. Dan Turner (1990). Hypocrisy. Metaphilosophy 21 (3):262-269.
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  33. R. Jay Wallace (2010). Hypocrisy, Moral Address, and the Equal Standing of Persons. Philosophy and Public Affairs 38 (4):307-341.
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  34. George W. Watson & Farooq Sheikh (2008). Normative Self-Interest or Moral Hypocrisy?: The Importance of Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):259 - 269.
    We re-examine the construct of Moral Hypocrisy from the perspective of normative self-interest. Arguing that some degree of self-interest is culturally acceptable and indeed expected, we postulate that a pattern of behavior is more indicative of moral hypocrisy than a single action. Contrary to previous findings, our results indicate that a significant majority of subjects (N = 136) exhibited fair behavior, and that ideals of caring and fairness, when measured in context of the scenario, were predictive of those behaviors. Moreover, (...)
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