Bookmark and Share

Idealism

Edited by A. P. Taylor (State University of New York, Buffalo)
Related categories
Siblings:See also:History/traditions: Idealism
91 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 91
  1. Robert Merrihew Adams (1987). Berkeley and Epistemology. In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Edwin B. Allaire (1982). Berkeley's Idealism Revisited. In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Edwin B. Allaire (1963). Berkeley's Idealism. Theoria 29 (3):229-244.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Alex Astrov (2005). The Sceptical Idealist: Michael Oakeshott as a Critic of the Enlightenment. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (2):211.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Luis M. Augusto (2005). Who's Afraid of Idealism? University Press of America.
    In Who's Afraid of Idealism? the philosophical concept of idealism, the extent to which reality is mind-made, is examined in new light. Author Luis M. Augusto explores epistemological idealism, at the source of all other kinds of idealism, from the viewpoints of Immanuel Kant and Friedrich Nietzsche, two philosophers who spent a large part of their lives denigrating the very concept. Working from Kant and Nietzsche's viewpoints that idealism was a scandal to philosophy and the cause of nihilism, Augusto evaluates (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Murat Baç & Renée Elio (2004). Scheme-Based Alethic Realism: Agency, the Environment, and Truthmaking. Minds and Machines 14 (2):173-196.
    This paper presents a position called Scheme-based Alethic Realism, which reconciles a realist position on the nature of truth with a pluralistic Kantian perspective that allows for multiple environments in which truthmaking relationships are established. We argue that truthmaking functions are constrained by a stable phenomenal world and a stable cognitive architecture. This account takes truth as normatively distinct from epistemic justification while relativizing the truth conditions of our statements to what we call Frameworks. The pluralistic aspect allows that these (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Isaac D. Balbus (2003). Against the Idealism of the Affects. Political Theory 31 (6):859-870.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Marina Paola Banchetti (1992). My Station and Its Duties. Idealistic Studies 22 (1):11-27.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. E. Barkin (2003). Relative Phenomenalism - Toward a More Plausible Theory of Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (8):3-13.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. John Bolender (2001). An Argument for Idealism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (4):37-61.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. John Bolender (1998). Factual Phenomenalism: A Supervenience Theory. Sorites 9 (9):16-31.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Curtis Brown (1988). Internal Realism: Transcendental Idealism? Midwest Studies in Philosophy 12 (1):145-155.
    Idealism is an ontological view, a view about what sorts of things there are in the universe. Idealism holds that what there is depends on our own mental structure and activity. Berkeley of course held that everything was mental; Kant held the more complex view that there was an important distinction between the mental and the physical, but that the structure of the empirical world depended on the activities of minds. Despite radical differences, idealists like Berkeley and Kant share what (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Edward P. Butler (2011). Plato's Gods and the Way of Ideas. Diotima 39:73-87.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Ralph W. Church (1935). On Dr. Ewing's Neglect of Bradley's Theory of Internal Relations. Journal of Philosophy 32 (10):264-273.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. R. G. Collingwood (1924/1982). Speculum Mentis, or, the Map of Knowledge. Greenwood Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Maeve Cooke (2012). Realism and Idealism: Was Habermas's Communicative Turn a Move in the Wrong Direction? Political Theory 40 (6):811 - 821.
  17. Jason Costanzo (2009). Idea and Intuition: On the Perceptibility of the Platonic Ideas in Arthur Schopenhauer. Dissertation, KU Leuven
    In this thesis, I examine the perceptibility of the Platonic Ideas in the thought of Arthur Schopenhauer. The work is divided into four chapters, each focusing and building upon a specific aspect related to this question. The first chapter (“"Plato and the Primacy of Intellect"”) deals with Schopenhauer’s interpretation specific to Platonic thought. I there address the question of why it is that Schopenhauer should consider Plato to have interpreted the Ideas as 'perceptible', particularly in view of evidence which seems (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Daniel A. Cowan (2002). Mind Underlies Spacetime: The Axioms Describing Directly Interconnected Substance and the Model That Explains Away Finiteness. Joseph Pub..
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Gustavus Watts Cunningham (1933/1969). The Idealistic Argument in Recent British and American Philosophy. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Benjamin L. Curtis (2009). A New Look at Berkeley's Idealism. Heythrop Journal 50 (2):189-194.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Giuseppina D'Oro (2005). Idealism and the Philosophy of Mind. Inquiry 48 (5):395-412.
    This paper defends an idealist form of non-reductivism in the philosophy of mind. I refer to it as a kind of conceptual dualism without substance dualism. I contrast this idealist alternative with the two most widespread forms of non-reductivism: multiple realisability functionalism and anomalous monism. I argue first, that functionalism fails to challenge seriously the claim for methodological unity since it is quite comfortable with the idea that it is possible to articulate a descriptive theory of the mind. Second, that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. D. M. Datta (1933). The Objective Idealism of Berkeley. The Monist 43 (2):220-235.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Cornelis de Waal (2006). Having an Idea of Matter: A Peircean Refutation of Berkeleyan Immaterialism. Journal of the History of Ideas 67 (2):291-313.
  24. Willem A. deVries (2009). Getting Beyond Idealisms. In Willem A. DeVries (ed.), Empiricism, Perceptual Knowledge, Normativity, and Realism: Essays on Wilfrid Sellars. Oxford University Press.
    This paper investigates Sellars's complex attitude towards idealism. It distinguishes between the epistemologically-based arguments that led many empiricists to idealism and a different set of more purely metaphysical arguments that came to dominate in German Idealism. Sellars resolutely rejects all of the epistemological arguments for idealism, but shows much greater sympathy with the metaphysical arguments. It is then argued that Sellars introduced his notion of picturing to avoid falling into such an idealism.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Georges Dicker (2011). Berkeley's Idealism: A Critical Examination. Oxford University Press.
    Berkeley's Idealism both advances Berkeley scholarship and serves as a useful guide for teachers and students.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. George Dykhuizen (1934). The Conception of God in the Philosophy of Josiah Royce: A Critical Exposition of its Epistemological and Metaphysical Development. Chicago.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Terence Rajivan Edward, Has Nagel Uncovered a Form of Idealism?
    In the sixth chapter of The View from Nowhere, Thomas Nagel attempts to identify a form of idealism. The position that he deems idealist is that what there is must be possibly conceivable by us. Nagel claims that this position is held by a number of contemporary philosophers. Even if this is so, I justify the view that it is not a form of idealism.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Terence Rajivan Edward (2009). Nagel on Concievability. Abstracta 5 (1):16-29.
    In the sixth chapter of The View from Nowhere, Thomas Nagel aims to identify a form of idealism, to isolate the argument for it and to counter this argument. The position that Nagel takes to be idealist is that what there is must be possibly conceivable by us. In this paper, I show that Nagel has not made a convincing case against this position. I then present an alternative case. In light of this alternative case, we have reason to reject (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Nicholas Everitt (1997). Quasi-Berkeleyan Idealism as Perspicuous Theism. Faith and Philosophy 14 (3):353-377.
    In this paper, I argue that the kind of idealism defended by Berkeley is a natural and almost unavoidable expression of his theism. Two main arguments are deployed, both starting from a theistic premise and having an idealist conclusion. The first likens the dependence of the physical world on the will of God to the dependence of mental states on a mind. The second likens divine omniscience to the kind of knowledge which it has often been supposed we have of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. A. C. Ewing (1935). On Dr. Ewing's Neglect of Bradley's Theory of Internal Relations: Reply. Journal of Philosophy 32 (10):273.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Phillip Ferreira (2011). On the Imperviousness of Persons: A Reply to Jan Olof Bengtsson. The Pluralist 6 (1):125-134.
    As regular readers of The Pluralist are aware, there appeared in 2008 an issue devoted to Jan Olof Bengtsson's The Worldview of Personalism.1 The issue included five articles, each concerned with a different aspect of the book; and after each article, there was a "Reply" by Bengtsson. In what follows, I shall say something about Bengtsson's reply to my own contribution, "Absolute and Personal Idealism." However, first let me briefly describe that article's argument.In "Absolute and Personal Idealism," I examined the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Hector Ferreiro (2012). La Teoría Hegeliana de la Imaginación. Estudios Hegelianos 1:16-29.
    In the process of knowledge imagination is, according to Hegel, the point where the human mind dissociates the object into two different contents - i.e. the thing of the external world and the internal content of the mind -, so that both versions of the object must corroborate each other in the way of a synthesis of heterogenous elements that only in their collation recognizes their identity. Comprehension sublates this dualism, and, by doing that, it sublates also the empiricist approach (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Hector Ferreiro (2011). El Lenguaje Como Elemento Inmanente Del Pensar y la Tesis Hegeliana de la Muerte Del Arte. Kalíope 7 (14):108-122.
    The main claim of Hegel´s System is that in its inner structure reality is consubstantial with subjective reason, so that, in spite of all its eventual contradictions, reality can be understood by the human mind. However, the process of knowledge of the rationality of reality is at the same time the process of self-knowledge of the rationality that defines as such the human mind. In this general process of knowledge-self-knowledge, the different artistic forms and the different periods of the History (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Matthew Caleb Flamm (2000). American and Gennan Tendencies In the Thought of Josiah Royce. Overheard in Seville 18 (18):24-30.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Noel Fleming (1985). Berkeley and Idealism. Philosophy 60 (233):309 - 325.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. John Foster (2008). A World for Us: The Case for Phenomenalistic Idealism. Oxford University Press.
    A World for Us aims to refute physical realism and establish in its place a form of idealism. Physical realism, in the sense in which John Foster understands it, takes the physical world to be something whose existence is both logically independent of the human mind and metaphysically fundamental. Foster identifies a number of problems for this realist view, but his main objection is that it does not accord the world the requisite empirical immanence. The form of idealism that he (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. John Foster (1996). The Succinct Case for Idealism. In Howard Robinson (ed.), Objections to Physicalism. Clarendon Press. 293-313.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. John Foster (1992). The Construction of the Physical World. In L. E. Hahn (ed.), The Philosophy of A J Ayer. Open Court.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. John A. Foster (1982). The Case for Idealism. Routledge.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. James Franklin (2002). Stove's Discovery of the Worst Argument in the World. Philosophy 77 (4):615-624.
    The winning entry in David Stove's Competition to Find the Worst Argument in the World was: “We can know things only as they are related to us/insofar as they fall under our conceptual schemes, etc., so, we cannot know things as they are in themselves.” That argument underpins many recent relativisms, including postmodernism, post-Kuhnian sociological philosophy of science, cultural relativism, sociobiological versions of ethical relativism, and so on. All such arguments have the same form as ‘We have eyes, therefore we (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jay L. Garfield (1998). Western Idealism Through Indian Eyes: A Cittamātra Reading of Berkeley, Kant and Schopenhauer. [REVIEW] Sophia 37 (1):10-41.
  42. Richard Glauser (2007). The Problem of the Unity of a Physical Object in Berkeley. In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. J. H. Greidanus (1973). The Psycho-Physical Nature of Reality. Amsterdam,B. V. Noord-Hollandsche Uitgevers Maatschappij.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Paul Guyer (1983). Kant's Intentions in the Refutation of Idealism. Philosophical Review 92 (3):329-383.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Kevin Harris, Rational Answers From Modal Idealism.
    The principles of modal idealism were derived from an analysis of existing philosophical, scientific and spiritual frameworks in order to generate a comprehensive explanation of the nature of Reality and our role in it that is consistent with our experiences. -/- To demonstrate the explanatory power of these principles this presentation will present seven of our most meaningful existential questions, enumerate the principles summarizing modal idealism, and rationally answer the questions in the context of these principles. -/- .
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Marc A. Hight (2007). Why My Chair is Not Merely a Congeries: Berkeley and the Single-Idea Thesis. In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jonathan Hill (2009). Gregory of Nyssa, Material Substance and Berkeleyan Idealism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (4):653-683.
  48. Herbert Hochberg (2013). Nominalism and Idealism. Axiomathes 23 (2):213-234.
    The article considers, in a historical setting, the links between varieties of nominalism—the extreme nominalism of the Quine-Goodman variety and the trope nominalism current today—and types of idealism. In so doing arguments of various twentieth century figures, including Husserl, Bradley, Russell, and Sartre, as well as a contemporary attack on relations by Peter Simons are critically examined. The paper seeks to link the rejection of realism about universals with the rejection of a mind-independent “world”—in short, linking nominalism with idealism.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Daniel Hutto, Bradleyian Metaphysics: A Healthy Scepticism.
    Leemon McHenry has recently written an article which aims "to evaluate the plausibility of Bradley's conception of metaphysics" (McHenry, 1996, p. 159). In the process of this evaluation he draws an important distinction between two kinds of metaphysical project, which he labels "'pure' and 'naturalized' metaphysics" (McHenry, 1996, p. 159). In McHenry's terms, the pure metaphysician approaches his task by appeal to 'pure thinking' alone. Although he defines the method of pure metaphysicians as being a priori in character he is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Daniel D. Hutto (2006). Turning Hard Problems on Their Heads. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):75-88.
    Much of the difficulty in assessing theories of consciousness stems from their advocates not supplying adequate or convincing characterisations of the phenomenon (or data) they hope to explain. Yet, to make any reasonable assessment this is precisely what is required, for it is not as if our ‘pre-theoretical’ intuitions are philosophically innocent. I attempt to reveal, using a recent debate between Chalmers and Dennett as a foil, why, in approaching this topic, we cannot characterise the data purely first-personally or third-personally (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 91