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Idealism

Edited by A. P. Taylor (North Dakota State University)
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  1. S. C. A. (1974). Conceptual Idealism. Review of Metaphysics 27 (4):811-812.
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  2. Robert Merrihew Adams (1987). Berkeley and Epistemology. In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel
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  3. Stacey Ake (1996). José Ortega y Gasset's Metaphysical Innovation: A Critique and Overcoming of Idealism, by Antonio Rodríguez Huéscar. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 49 (3):677-678.
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  4. Edwin B. Allaire (1982). Berkeley's Idealism Revisited. In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
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  5. Edwin B. Allaire (1963). Berkeley's Idealism. Theoria 29 (3):229-244.
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  6. Leslie Allan, The Existence of Mind-Independent Physical Objects.
    The author challenges both the eliminative idealist's contention that physical objects do not exist and the phenomenalist idealist's view that statements about physical objects are translatable into statements about private mental experiences. Firstly, he details how phenomenalist translations are parasitic on the realist assumption that physical objects exist independently of experience. Secondly, the author confronts eliminative idealism head on by exposing its heuristic sterility in contrast with realism's predictive success.
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  7. James C. Anderson (1979). Idealism and Comprehensible Worlds. Idealistic Studies 9 (3):251-257.
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  8. Leslie Armour (1991). Error and the Idealists. Philosophia 21 (1-2):3-23.
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  9. Alex Astrov (2005). The Sceptical Idealist: Michael Oakeshott as a Critic of the Enlightenment. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (2):211.
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  10. Murat Baç & Renée Elio (2004). Scheme-Based Alethic Realism: Agency, the Environment, and Truthmaking. Minds and Machines 14 (2):173-196.
    This paper presents a position called Scheme-based Alethic Realism, which reconciles a realist position on the nature of truth with a pluralistic Kantian perspective that allows for multiple environments in which truthmaking relationships are established. We argue that truthmaking functions are constrained by a stable phenomenal world and a stable cognitive architecture. This account takes truth as normatively distinct from epistemic justification while relativizing the truth conditions of our statements to what we call Frameworks. The pluralistic aspect allows that these (...)
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  11. J. B. Baillie (1908). Some Notes on Mr. Hoernle's Criticism of Idealism. Mind 17 (65):79-85.
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  12. Isaac D. Balbus (2003). Against the Idealism of the Affects. Political Theory 31 (6):859-870.
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  13. Isaac D. Balbus (2003). Review: Against the Idealism of the Affects. [REVIEW] Political Theory 31 (6):859 - 870.
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  14. Edward G. Ballard (1955). Jules Lachelier's Idealism. Review of Metaphysics 8 (4):685 - 705.
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  15. Marina Paola Banchetti (1992). My Station and Its Duties. Idealistic Studies 22 (1):11-27.
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  16. E. Barkin (2003). Relative Phenomenalism - Toward a More Plausible Theory of Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (8):3-13.
    Most philosophers believe that qualitative states must be explained in terms of physical states of the brain in order to resolve the mind/ body problem. But the severe difficulties involved in deriving the mental from the physical or, even more bizarrely, eliminating the mental altogether, have caused some to seriously investigate Russell's longstanding ideas about the intrinsic nature of physical entities. The resulting microphenomenal approaches, however, are of necessity extremely vague and complicated. Consequently, a macrophenomenal theory of mind may well (...)
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  17. J. D. Bastable (1958). The Idealist Tradition. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 8:197-199.
  18. Michela Bella (2012). Review of H.G. Callaway, James A Pluralistic Universe. [REVIEW] European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy (2):258-262.
    Bell's review of H.G. Callaway's new edition of William James' 1909 book, A Pluralistic Universe.
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  19. Ermanno Bencivenga (1984). Grundfragen der Erkenntnistheorie. Review of Metaphysics 38 (2):395-396.
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  20. Sara Bernstein (forthcoming). Causal Idealism. In Tyron Goldschmidt & Kenneth Pearce (eds.), Idealism: New Essays in Metaphysics. Oxford
    This paper argues that causal idealism, the view that causation is a product of mental activity, should be considered a competetitor to contemporary views that incorporate human thought and agency into the causal relation. Weighing contextualism, contrastivism, or pragmatism about causation against causal idealism results in at least a tie with respect to the virtues of these theories.
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  21. John Bolender (2001). An Argument for Idealism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (4):37-61.
    According to Russell, the intrinsic nature of the physical is the same as or deeply analogous to phenomenal qualities, those properties known through acquaintance in one's subjective experience. I defend his position and argue that it implies a kind of idealism, specifically the view that any intrinsic physical property instance can only exist as an object of acquaintance. This follows because a necessary feature of physicality is spatial location, and hence the intrinsic nature of the physical must share with phenomenal (...)
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  22. John Bolender (1998). Factual Phenomenalism: A Supervenience Theory. Sorites 9 (9):16-31.
    Broadly speaking, phenomenalism is the position that physical facts depend upon sensory facts. Many have thought it to imply that physical statements are translatable into sensory statements. Not surprisingly, the impossibility of such translations led many to abandon phenomenalism in favor of materialism. But this was rash, for if phenomenalism is reformulated as the claim that physical facts supervene upon sensory facts, then translatability is no longer required. Given materialism's failure to account for subjective experience, there has been a revival (...)
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  23. Edgar Sheffield Brightman (1929). A Misunderstanding of Idealism. Journal of Philosophy 26 (22):605-607.
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  24. May Brodbeck (1949). Coherence Theory Reconsidered: Professor Werkmeister on Semantics and on the Nature of Empirical Laws. Philosophy of Science 16 (1):75-85.
    Werkmeister's new book, The Basis and Structure of Knowledge is the second major attempt in recent years to defend the idealistic theory of knowledge. The first was Blanshard's Nature of Thought; and it is worth noticing that both authors, in undertaking the defense of a position long in the shadows, are well aware of contemporary developments in logic and technical philosophy. Werkmeister freely acknowledges his debt to Blanshard; yet his work differs in scope from the latter's in at least two (...)
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  25. Curtis Brown (1988). Internal Realism: Transcendental Idealism? Midwest Studies in Philosophy 12 (1):145-155.
    Idealism is an ontological view, a view about what sorts of things there are in the universe. Idealism holds that what there is depends on our own mental structure and activity. Berkeley of course held that everything was mental; Kant held the more complex view that there was an important distinction between the mental and the physical, but that the structure of the empirical world depended on the activities of minds. Despite radical differences, idealists like Berkeley and Kant share what (...)
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  26. G. Anthony Bruno (2015). Varieties of Transcendental Idealism in Advance. Idealistic Studies 45 (1).
    In recent work, William Blattner claims that Heidegger is an empirical realist, but not a transcendental idealist. Blattner argues that, unlike Kant, Heidegger holds that thinking beyond human life warrants no judgment about nature's existence. This poses two problems. One is interpretive: Blattner misreads Kant's conception of the beyond-life as yielding the judgment that nature does not exist, for Kant shares Heidegger's view that such a judgment must lack sense. Another is programmatic: Blattner overstates the gap between Kant's and Heidegger's (...)
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  27. John W. Burbidge (1999). Idealism as Modernism. Review of Metaphysics 52 (3):715-715.
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  28. Edward P. Butler (2011). Plato's Gods and the Way of Ideas. Diotima 39:73-87.
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  29. Ralph W. Church (1935). On Dr. Ewing's Neglect of Bradley's Theory of Internal Relations. Journal of Philosophy 32 (10):264-273.
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  30. R. G. Collingwood (1924/1982). Speculum Mentis, or, the Map of Knowledge. Greenwood Press.
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  31. Maeve Cooke (2012). Realism and Idealism: Was Habermas's Communicative Turn a Move in the Wrong Direction? Political Theory 40 (6):811 - 821.
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  32. Jason Costanzo (2009). Idea and Intuition: On the Perceptibility of the Platonic Ideas in Arthur Schopenhauer. Dissertation, KU Leuven
    In this thesis, I examine the perceptibility of the Platonic Ideas in the thought of Arthur Schopenhauer. The work is divided into four chapters, each focusing and building upon a specific aspect related to this question. The first chapter (“"Plato and the Primacy of Intellect"”) deals with Schopenhauer’s interpretation specific to Platonic thought. I there address the question of why it is that Schopenhauer should consider Plato to have interpreted the Ideas as 'perceptible', particularly in view of (...)
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  33. Daniel A. Cowan (2002). Mind Underlies Spacetime: The Axioms Describing Directly Interconnected Substance and the Model That Explains Away Finiteness. Joseph Pub..
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  34. Gustavus Watts Cunningham (1933/1969). The Idealistic Argument in Recent British and American Philosophy. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.
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  35. Benjamin L. Curtis (2009). A New Look at Berkeley's Idealism. Heythrop Journal 50 (2):189-194.
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  36. Giuseppina D'Oro (2005). Idealism and the Philosophy of Mind. Inquiry 48 (5):395-412.
    This paper defends an idealist form of non-reductivism in the philosophy of mind. I refer to it as a kind of conceptual dualism without substance dualism. I contrast this idealist alternative with the two most widespread forms of non-reductivism: multiple realisability functionalism and anomalous monism. I argue first, that functionalism fails to challenge seriously the claim for methodological unity since it is quite comfortable with the idea that it is possible to articulate a descriptive theory of the mind. Second, that (...)
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  37. Jonas Dagys (2008). J. McTaggart And H. Mellor on Time. Problemos 73:115-121.
    The article analyzes John McTaggart’s argument for unreality of time, a classical piece of fin de siècleBrittish idealist metaphysics. Having accepted the distinction between A-series and B-series, one can only resist McTaggartian conclusion by denying at least one of the two: that B-series alone is insufficient for change or that A-series implies a contradiction. Hugh Mellor’s criticism is taken to represent thisstrategy. The lesson to be learnt from this debate is that if the world is conceived as a mere totality (...)
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  38. D. M. Datta (1933). The Objective Idealism of Berkeley. The Monist 43 (2):220-235.
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  39. Cornelis de Waal (2006). Having an Idea of Matter: A Peircean Refutation of Berkeleyan Immaterialism. Journal of the History of Ideas 67 (2):291-313.
  40. Willem A. deVries (2009). Getting Beyond Idealisms. In Willem A. DeVries (ed.), Empiricism, Perceptual Knowledge, Normativity, and Realism: Essays on Wilfrid Sellars. Oxford University Press
    This paper investigates Sellars's complex attitude towards idealism. It distinguishes between the epistemologically-based arguments that led many empiricists to idealism and a different set of more purely metaphysical arguments that came to dominate in German Idealism. Sellars resolutely rejects all of the epistemological arguments for idealism, but shows much greater sympathy with the metaphysical arguments. It is then argued that Sellars introduced his notion of picturing to avoid falling into such an idealism.
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  41. Georges Dicker (2011). Berkeley's Idealism: A Critical Examination. Oxford University Press.
    Berkeley's Idealism both advances Berkeley scholarship and serves as a useful guide for teachers and students.
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  42. Dominic K. Dimech, A New Approach to the Coherence Theory of Truth.
    This paper does not argue that the coherence theory should be the accepted theory about what truth is. It aims, rather, to present the coherence theory of truth in a new light, in a way that sheds understanding on why the theory has had such prominence in the history of the philosophy of truth. Thus, although this paper is not a defence of the theory per se, it offers a charitable interpretation of it. The coherence theory has a paradoxical status (...)
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  43. George Dykhuizen (1934). The Conception of God in the Philosophy of Josiah Royce: A Critical Exposition of its Epistemological and Metaphysical Development. Chicago.
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  44. Terence Rajivan Edward (2009). Has Nagel Uncovered a Form of Idealism? Accepted for Sorites 22.
    In the sixth chapter of The View from Nowhere, Thomas Nagel attempts to identify a form of idealism. The position that he deems idealist is that what there is must be possibly conceivable by us. Nagel claims that this position is held by a number of contemporary philosophers. Even if this is so, I justify the view that it is not a form of idealism.
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  45. Terence Rajivan Edward (2009). Nagel on Concievability. Abstracta 5 (1):16-29.
    In the sixth chapter of The View from Nowhere, Thomas Nagel aims to identify a form of idealism, to isolate the argument for it and to counter this argument. The position that Nagel takes to be idealist is that what there is must be possibly conceivable by us. In this paper, I show that Nagel has not made a convincing case against this position. I then present an alternative case. In light of this alternative case, we have reason to reject (...)
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  46. Peter Ells (2014). Eliminating the Physical. Oxford Philosophical Society Review 36:23-27.
    If we reject physicalism, for the reasons given in my 2011 book ‘Panpsychism,’ we can arrive at a variant of idealism that accepts the concrete existence of all entities discoverable by science, but argues that these are nothing over and above centres of experience that can perceive one another and act on their percepts. In this metaphysical system, all physical properties and laws reduce without remainder to mental dittos – length is used in this paper as an example. Adopting this (...)
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  47. Peter Ells (2011). Panpsychism: The Philosophy of the Sensuous Cosmos. John Hunt Publishing.
    This work makes the case for a variant of panpsychism with an idealist metaphysic. It does not deny the concrete existence of any entities discoverable from commonplace experience or by science (such as cats, rocks, molecules and quarks), but argues that all true entities (the entire furniture of the universe) are in essence nothing over and above centres of experience that can perceive one another and act on their percepts. All physical properties and laws reduce without remainder to mental dittos. (...)
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  48. Peter Ells (2011). A Defence of Speculative Metaphysics. Oxford Philosophical Society Review 33:111-116.
    Metaphysics has been rejected as nonsense by some philosophers (notably Hume and Ayer) because metaphysical systems cannot be tested empirically. This paper argues that these systems can still usefully be compared by using such criteria as: 1) Scope; 2) Not denying basic data; 3) Plausibility; 4) The minimum number of brute facts needed; 5) Engagement with and consistency with current science; 6) Lack of ‘promissory notes’; 7) Elegance and simplicity; 8) Clarity versus fudge. Berkeley’s Idealism and Physicalism (in both qualia (...)
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  49. Nicholas Everitt (1997). Quasi-Berkeleyan Idealism as Perspicuous Theism. Faith and Philosophy 14 (3):353-377.
    In this paper, I argue that the kind of idealism defended by Berkeley is a natural and almost unavoidable expression of his theism. Two main arguments are deployed, both starting from a theistic premise and having an idealist conclusion. The first likens the dependence of the physical world on the will of God to the dependence of mental states on a mind. The second likens divine omniscience to the kind of knowledge which it has often been supposed we have of (...)
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  50. A. C. Ewing (1935). On Dr. Ewing's Neglect of Bradley's Theory of Internal Relations: Reply. Journal of Philosophy 32 (10):273.
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