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  1. E. M. Aasen (2015). A Comparison of the Discursive Practices of Perception of Patient Participation in Haemodialysis Units. Nursing Ethics 22 (3):341-351.
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  2. Tineke A. Abma (2005). Struggling with the Fragility of Life: A Relational-Narrative Approach to Ethics in Palliative Nursing. Nursing Ethics 12 (4):337-348.
    In nursing ethics the role of narratives and dialogue has become more prominent in recent years. The purpose of this article is to illuminate a relational-narrative approach to ethics in the context of palliative nursing. The case study presented concerns a difficult relationship between oncology nurses and a husband whose wife was hospitalized with cancer. The husband’s narrative is an expression of depression, social isolation and the loss of hope. He found no meaning in the process of dying and death. (...)
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  3. Tineke A. Abma, Barth Oeseburg, Guy Am Widdershoven, Minke Goldsteen & Marian A. Verkerk (2005). Two Women with Multiple Sclerosis and Their Caregivers: Conflicting Normative Expectations. Nursing Ethics 12 (5):479-492.
    It is not uncommon that nurses are unable to meet the normative expectations of chronically ill patients. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate Walker’s expressive-collaborative view of morality to interpret the normative expectations of two women with multiple sclerosis. Both women present themselves as autonomous persons who make their own choices, but who also have to rely on others for many aspects of their lives, for example, to find a new balance between work and social contacts (...)
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  4. Felicia Ackerman (1997). Goldilocks and Mrs. Ilych: A Critical Look at the “Philosophy of Hospice”. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (3):314-.
    Anyone who thinks contemporary American society is hopelessly contentious and lacking in shared values has probably not been paying attention to the way the popular media portray the hospice movement. Over and over, we are told such things as that “Humane care costs less than high-tech care and is what patients want and need,” that hospices are “the most effective and least expensive route to a dignified death,” that hospice personnel are “heroic,” that their “compassion and dedication seem inexhaustible,” and (...)
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  5. Terrence F. Ackerman (1982). Why Doctors Should Intervene. Hastings Center Report 12 (4):14-17.
  6. Terrence F. Ackerman (1980). The Limits of Beneficence: Jehovah's Witnesses & Childhood Cancer. Hastings Center Report 10 (4):13-18.
  7. S. T. Adams & S. H. Leveson (2011). Should Blood-Borne Virus Testing Be Part of Operative Consent? When the Doctor Becomes the Patient. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):476-478.
    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is a sensitive, specific and rapid form of testing for the presence of HIV antibodies. Post-exposure prophylaxis for HIV infection can reduce seroconversion rates by up to 80%. Needlestick injuries are the second commonest cause of occupational injury in the NHS and 20% of these occur during operations. In the NHS, in order to protect staff and patients from the risk of bloodborne viruses such as HIV, it is mandatory to report such injuries; however, numerous studies have (...)
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  8. S. M. Adib & G. N. Hamadeh (1999). Attitudes of the Lebanese Public Regarding Disclosure of Serious Illness. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (5):399-403.
    OBJECTIVES: To measure the preference regarding disclosure of a serious diagnosis, and its determinants, of the Lebanese public. DESIGN AND SETTING: Non-random sample survey of 400 persons interviewed in health care facilities in Beirut in 1995. RESULTS: Forty-two per cent of respondents generally preferred truth not to be disclosed directly to patients. Preference for disclosure was associated with younger age, better education and tendency to rapport-building with physicians. There were no meaningful associations between place of residence (urban/rural), level of religious (...)
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  9. M. W. Adler (1991). HIV, Confidentiality and 'a Delicate Balance': A Reply to Leone Ridsdale. Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (4):196-198.
    The passing on of information to GPs by genito-urinary doctors is to be encouraged but is not always possible and ultimately the patient's wishes and confidentiality must be respected if sexually transmitted diseases and HIV infection are to be controlled. Infected health-care workers should seek counselling and medical support and clear guidelines from professional organisations which are in existence. However, they will only do so if strict confidentiality is maintained and assurance about future employment can be given.
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  10. Muhammed Afolabi (2015). Situating the Trovan Trial With the Use of Experimental Ebola Therapies Is Like Comparing an Apple With an Orange. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (1):19-20.
    I read with great bewilderment the unconvincing arguments of Peter F. Omonzejele in his article “Ethical Challenges Posed by the Ebola Virus Epidemic in West Africa” published in the 11 issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry. While the author glaringly mixed up anthropological issues concerning the hygiene of hand-washing and safe burials in an article with a title clearly focused on ethical challenges, he failed to establish how the current Ebola epidemic ravaging some West Africa countries made these human (...)
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  11. A. Agard, R. Lofmark, N. Edvardsson & I. Ekman (2007). Views of Patients with Heart Failure About Their Role in the Decision to Start Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Treatment: Prescription Rather Than Participation. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (9):514-518.
    Background: There is a shortage of reports on what potential recipients of implantable cardioverter–defibrillators need to be informed about and what role they can and want to play in the decision-making process when it comes to whether or not to implant an ICD.Aims: To explore how patients with heart failure and previous episodes of malignant arrhythmia experience and view their role in the decision to initiate ICD treatment.Patients and methods: A qualitative content analysis of semistructured interviews was used. The study (...)
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  12. Jonny Anomaly (2014). What is an Epidemic? Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 42 (3):389-391.
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  13. Lisa Bortolotti (2012). Rationality and Sanity. In Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press
    Chapter discussing the relationship between rationality and sanity.
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  14. Lisa Bortolotti (ed.) (2008). The Philosophy of Happiness. Palgrave.
    Philosophy and Happiness addresses the need to situate any meaningful discourse about happiness in a wider context of human interests, capacities and circumstances. How is happiness manifested and expressed? Can there be any happiness if no worthy life projects are pursued? How is happiness affected by relationships, illness, or cultural variants? Can it be reduced to preference satisfaction? Is it a temporary feeling or a persistent way of being? Is reflection conducive to happiness? Is mortality necessary for it? These are (...)
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  15. Mitchell S. Cappell (2011). The Physician-Administrator as Patient Distinctive Aspects of Medical Care. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (2):232-242.
    Although much has been written about how physicians react to their own illness, the subject of how health-care workers react differently to sick physicians compared to ordinary patients is largely unstudied (Klitzman 2008; Mandell and Spiro 1987; Mullan 1985; Pinner and Miller 1952; Sachs 1989; Schneck 1998). As a senior physician-administrator admitted to my hospital for a major illness, I was treated as a physician-administrator and local celebrity, rather than an ordinary patient, by everybody from physicians to janitors. Positive features (...)
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  16. Angus Dawson (ed.) (2009). The Philosophy of Public Health. Ashgate.
    A number of theoretical ideas have emerged recently in the legal, bioethical and philosophical fields that could usefully be applied to these and other issues ...
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  17. Kenneth J. Doka (2008). Religious and Spiritual Perspectives on Life-Threatening Illness, Dying, and Death. In James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.), Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions. Brunner-Routledge
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  18. Élodie Giroux & Maël Lemoine (2012). Textes Clés de Philosophie de la Médecine: Vol. Ii : Santé, Maladie, Pathologie. Vrin.
    Depuis le célèbre essai de Georges Canguilhem sur le normal et le pathologique publié initialement en 1943 et dont l’un des objectifs était la clarification des concepts de santé et de maladie, une littérature philosophique abondante, principalement anglo-saxonne, s’est attachée à définir ces concepts et à analyser leur statut. Le principal débat de ce domaine émergent de la philosophie de la médecine porte sur la question : peut-on décrire la santé et la maladie comme des phénomènes naturels ou s’agit-il d’états (...)
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  19. Daniel Groll (2011). What You Don't Know Can Help You: The Ethics of Placebo Treatment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):188-202.
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  20. Benjamin Hale & Lauren Hale (2009). Choosing to Sleep. In Angus Dawson (ed.), The Philosophy of Public Health. Ashgate
    In this paper we claim that individual subjects do not have so much control over sleep that it is aptly characterized as a personal choice; and that normative implications related to public health and sleep hygiene do not necessarily follow from current findings. It should be true of any empirical study that normative implications do not necessarily follow, but we think that many public health sleep recommendations falsely infer these implications from a flawed explanatory account of the decision to sleep: (...)
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  21. L. Hawryluck (2002). Neuromuscular Blockers--A Means of Palliation? Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (3):170-172.
    As we die, our respiratory pattern is altered and we seem to gasp and struggle for each breath. Such gasping is commonly seen as a clear sign of dyspnoea and suffering by families and loved ones, however, it is unclear whether it is perceived at all by the dying person. Narcotics and sedatives do not seem to affect these gasping respirations. In this issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics, we are asked to consider whether the last gasp of a (...)
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  22. Helmut Hofbauer (2015). Was Wir Aus Dem Gettier-Problem Über den Begriff des Wissens Lernen Können. Und Was Daraus Für Die Möglichkeit von PatientInnenwissen Folgt. In Helmut Hofbauer, Lukas Kaelin, Hendrik Jan Ankersmit & Walter Feigl (eds.), Ist der Patient ein Mensch? LIT Verlag 131-165.
    The article talks about the social consequences of the so called Standard Analysis of Knowledge. Gettier cases demonstrate that human beings would need superhuman powers in order to fullfill the truth condition of the Standard Analysis of Knowledge. When Gettier cases are told, the storyteller usually omits to report who noticed what was the truth in this case and how he or she informed the protagonist of the Gettier case about it. This is done that way in order to hide (...)
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  23. Kiraly V. Istvan (2011). A betegseg az elo letlehetosege - Illness a Possibility of the Living Being (Bilingual: hungarian-english edition). Kalligram.
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  24. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Exemplarism, Ethics, and Illness Narratives. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics.
    Many people report that reading first-person narratives of the experience of illness can be morally instructive or educative. But although they are ubiquitous and typically sincere, the precise nature of such educative experiences is puzzling—for those narratives typically lack the features that modern philosophers regard as constitutive of moral reason. I argue that such puzzlement should disappear, and the morally educative power of illness narratives explained, if one distinguishes two different styles of moral reason: an inferentialist style that generates the (...)
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  25. Ian James Kidd (2015). Transformative Suffering and The Cultivation of Virtue. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (4):291-294.
    The idea that certain experiences of suffering can be positively transformative has a central role in the practical and pastoral aspects of Christian theology. It is easy to identify different historical and doctrinal reasons why physical, mental, and spiritual suffering enjoy a central role in that tradition, but less easy to articulate and justify the provocative claim that suffering can be positively transformative. Indeed, some critics protest that the very idea is deeply offensive, on moral, theological, and psychological grounds, and (...)
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  26. Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel (forthcoming). Epistemic Injustice in Medicine and Healthcare. In Ian James Kidd, Gaile Pohlhaus & José Medina (eds.), The Routledge Handbook to Epistemic Injustice. Routledge
  27. Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel (2015). Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare: A Philosophical Analysis. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):529-540.
  28. Christopher Megone (2000). Mental Illness, Human Function, and Values. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 7 (1):45-65.
    The present paper constitutes a development of the position that illness, whether bodily or mental, should be analyzed as an incapacitating failure of bodily or mental capacities, respectively, to realize their functions. The paper undertakes this development by responding to two critics. It addresses first Szasz’s continued claims that (1) physical illness is the paradigm concept of illness and (2) a philosophical analysis of mental illness does not shed any light on the social and legal role of the idea. Then, (...)
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  29. Ronald Pies (2009). The Ethics of Limb Amputation and Locus of Disease. Neuroethics 2 (3):179-180.
    The ethics of medically-authorized limb amputation in individuals with Body integrity identity disorder (BIID) remains extremely controversial. One factor to consider is the putative locus of a disease process, and whether the proposed treatment--in this case, limb amputation—reasonably addresses the issue of what organ is mediating the patient’s complaint.
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  30. Fiona Randall (1996). Palliative Care Ethics: A Good Companion. Oxford University Press.
    Palliative care is a recent branch of health care. The doctors, nurses, and other professionals involved in it took their inspiration from the medieval idea of the hospice, but have now extended their expertise to every area of health care: surgeries, nursing homes, acute wards, and the community. This has happened during a period when patients wish to take more control over their own lives and deaths, resources have become scarce, and technology has created controversial life-prolonging treatments. Palliative care is (...)
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  31. David Shaw & Bernice Elger (2013). Creating a Biobank for International Radiation Disaster Research: A Proposal for Proactive International Cooperation. Lancet Oncology 14:1042 – 1043.
    Biobanks are vital for diagnostic, epidemiological and research purposes following radiation disasters, but there is a history of delays in this type of research and specifically in setting up important resources including tissue repositories following the rare occurrence of these events. Here, we argue that one key lesson from Chernobyl and Fukushima has still not been learned: it is essential to agree on a proactive international plan for a radiation disaster biobank and accompanying data collection before the next disaster occurs.
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  32. Barry Smith, Werner Ceusters, Louis J. Goldberg & Richard Ohrbach (2011). Towards an Ontology of Pain. In Proceedings of the Conference on Ontology and Analytical Metaphysics. Keio University Press
    We present an ontology of pain and of other pain-related phenomena, building on the definition of pain provided by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). Our strategy is to identify an evolutionarily basic canonical pain phenomenon, involving unpleasant sensory and emotional experience based causally in localized tissue damage that is concordant with that experience. We then show how different variant cases of this canonical pain phenomenon can be distinguished, including pain that is elevated relative to peripheral trauma, (...)
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  33. Sean A. Valles (2012). Lionel Penrose and the Concept of Normal Variation in Human Intelligence. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):281-289.
    Lionel Penrose (1898–1972) was an important leader during the mid-20th century decline of eugenics and the development of modern medical genetics. However, historians have paid little attention to his radical theoretical challenges to mainline eugenic concepts of mental disease. Working from a classification system developed with his colleague, E. O. Lewis, Penrose developed a statistically sophisticated and clinically grounded refutation of the popular position that low intelligence is inherently a disease state. In the early 1930s, Penrose advocated dividing “mental defect” (...)
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