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  1. Edward S. Casey (2000). Stompin' on Scott: A Cursory Critique of Mind and Memory. Research in Phenomenology 30 (1):223-239.
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  2. Edward S. Casey (1977). Imagining and Remembering. Review of Metaphysics 31 (December):187-209.
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  3. E. J. Furlong (1970). Mr. Urmson on Memory and Imagination. Mind 79 (313):137-138.
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  4. E. J. Furlong (1956). The Empiricist Theory of Memory. Mind 65 (October):542-47.
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  5. Peter Goldie (2012). The Inner Mess. Oxford University Press.
    Peter Goldie explores the ways in which we think about our lives--our past, present, and future--in narrative terms. The notion of narrative is highly topical, and highly contentious, in a wide range of fields including philosophy, psychology and psychoanalysis, historical studies, and literature. The Mess Inside engages with all of these areas of discourse, and steers a path between the sceptics who are dismissive of the idea of narrative as having any worthwhile use at all, and those who argue that (...)
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  6. Owen Holland & Hugo Gravato Marques (2010). Functional Embodied Imagination and Episodic Memory. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (02):245-259.
  7. S. A. Howard (2012). Nostalgia. Analysis 72 (4):641-650.
    Next SectionThis article argues against two dominant accounts of the nature of nostalgia. These views assume that nostalgia depends, in some way, on comparing a present situation with a past one. However, neither does justice to the full range of recognizably nostalgic experiences available to us – in particular, ‘Proustian’ nostalgia directed at involuntary autobiographical memories. Therefore, the accounts in question fail. I conclude by considering an evaluative puzzle raised by Proustian nostalgia when it is directed at memories that the (...)
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  8. Stephen M. Kosslyn & Samuel T. Moulton (2012). Mental Imagery and Implicit Memory. In Keith D. Markman, William M. P. Klein & Julie A. Suhr (eds.), Handbook of Imagination and Mental Simulation. Psychology Press.
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  9. Peter Langland‐Hassan (2014). Imaginative Attitudes. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (3).
    The point of this paper is to reveal a dogma in the ordinary conception of sensory imagination, and to suggest another way forward. The dogma springs from two main sources: a too close comparison of mental imagery to perceptual experience, and a too strong division between mental imagery and the traditional propositional attitudes (such as belief and desire). The result is an unworkable conception of the correctness conditions of sensory imaginings—one lacking any link between the conditions under which an imagining (...)
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  10. Bjorn Merker (2007). Memory, Imagination, and the Asymmetry Between Past and Future. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):325-326.
    A number of difficulties encumber the Suddendorf & Corballis (S&C) proposal regarding mental time travel into the future. Among these are conceptual issues turning on the inherent asymmetry of time and causality with regard to past and future, and the bearing of such asymmetry on the uses and utility of retrospective versus prospective mental time travel, on which I comment.
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  11. Renato J. Ribeiro (2004). Imagination and Memory in Stendhal. Diogenes 51 (1):55-63.
    Imagination and memory are often distinguished as fiction and reality, but classical authors, such as Hobbes, have been well aware of their similitudes. And the French writer Stendhal (acknowledging his debt to Hobbes, whose works he read in his youth) is perhaps the novelist to have shown most accurately how, from the moment love became amour passion in the beginning of the 19th century, the power of imagination inside memory began to grow – until it was able to undermine and (...)
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  12. J. O. Urmson (1971). Memory and Imagination. Mind 80 (1):70-92.