Related categories
Siblings:
233 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 233
  1. Letizia Abbondanza (2010). Ekphrasis (R.) Webb Ekphrasis, Imagination and Persuasion in Ancient Rhetorical Theory and Practice. Pp. Xiv + 238. Farnham and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2009. Cased, £55. ISBN: 978-0-7546-6125-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (02):404-406.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Virgil C. Aldrich (1941). The Scientific Abuse of the Imagination. Journal of Philosophy 38 (10):270-275.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. H. G. Alexander (1963). A Suggestion Concerning Empirical Foundations of Imagination. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 23 (3):427-431.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Peder Anker (2004). Tropical Imagination. Metascience 13 (1):95-97.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Richard Aquila (1989). Imagination as a “Medium” in the Critique of Pure Reason. The Monist 72 (2):209-221.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Josiah Lee Auspitz (1976). Individuality, Civility, and Theory: The Philosophical Imagination of Michael Oakeshott. Political Theory 4 (3):261-294.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Susan E. Babbitt (1996). Impossible Dreams: Rationality, Integrity, and Moral Imagination. Westview Press.
    Conventional wisdom and commonsense morality tend to take the integrity of persons for granted. But for people in systematically unjust societies, self-respect and human dignity may prove to be impossible dreams.Susan Babbitt explores the implications of this insight, arguing that in the face of systemic injustice, individual and social rationality may require the transformation rather than the realization of deep-seated aims, interests, and values. In particular, under such conditions, she argues, the cultivation and ongoing exercise of moral imagination is necessary (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Renate Bartsch (2002). Consciousness Emerging: The Dynamics of Perception, Imagination, Action, Memory, Thought, and Language. John Benjamins.
  9. Raymond D. Beisvert (1989). The Wake of Imagination. The Personalist Forum 5 (2):152-154.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Günter Berghaus (ed.) (2009). Futurism and the Technological Imagination. Rodopi.
    This volume, Futurism and the Technological Imagination, results from a conference of the International Society for the Study of European Ideas in Helsinki.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Michael Berman (2006). Imagining Bodies: Merleau-Ponty's Philosophy of Imagination. Dialogue 45 (4):771-774.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Michael Berman (2006). Imagining Bodies: Merleau-Ponty's Philosophy of Imagination James B. Steeves Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2004, Xvii + 206 Pp., $22.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 45 (04):771-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jeffrey Bernstein (1997). Imagination and Lunacy in Kant's First Critique and Anthropology. Idealistic Studies 27 (3):143-154.
  14. Alessandro Bertinetto (2012). Bild. Fichte Und der "Iconic Turn&Quot;. Fichte-Studien 36:269-284.
  15. André Blanc (1970). L'Imagination et le Merveilleux. Studi Internazionali Di Filosofia 2:184-185.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Anthony Blunt (1943). Blake's Pictorial Imagination. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 6:190-212.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Richard Bodéüs (1990). L'imagination au pouvoir. Dialogue 29 (01):21-.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Louise Braddock (2011). Psychological Identification, Imagination and Psychoanalysis. Philosophical Psychology 24 (5):639 - 657.
    Identification as a psychological concept is widely used in psychology and in social science. This use relies on an ordinary understanding of what identification is, and this understanding has itself been influenced by psychoanalysis. The concept is, however, in need of philosophical exploration. Central to its use is the idea of character, its nature and its development, which like identification itself is under-theorized. I use Richard Wollheim's philosophical analysis of identification in terms of the imagination, to trace a path from (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Emily Brady, Sublime Attachment : Imagination, Feeling and Respect for Nature.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Emily Brady (1998). Imagination and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (2):139-147.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Don J. Briel (1997). 10. Wanted: A Ground for the Imagination. Logos 1 (1).
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Katy Gray Brown (2003). Book Review: Shari M. Huhndorf. Going Native: Indians in the American Cultural Imagination. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2001. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):218-221.
  23. Vivienne Brown (1997). 'Mere Inventions of the Imagination': A Survey of Recent Literature on Adam Smith. Economics and Philosophy 13 (2):281-312.
  24. Robert Sherrick Brumbaugh (1954). Plato's Mathematical Imagination. Bloomington, Indiana University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Thomas O. Buford (1989). Person, Identity, and Imagination. The Personalist Forum 5 (1):7-25.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Murray Wright Bundy (1927/1978). The Theory of Imagination in Classical and Mediaeval Thought. R. West.
    Pre-Socratic philosophy. - Plato. - Aristotle. - Post-Aristotelian philosophy. - The Theory of art: Quintilian, Longinus, and Philostratus. - Plotinus. - The lesser Neoplatonists. - Neoplatonic views of three early Christians. - Mediaeval descriptive psychology. - The psychology of the mystics. - Dante's theory of vision. - Conclusion.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Stephen Andrew Butterfill (2008). Review: Ruth M. J. Byrne: The Rational Imagination: How People Create Alternatives to Reality. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (468):1065-1069.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Alex Byrne (2010). Recollection, Perception, Imagination. Philosophical Studies 148 (1):15 - 26.
    Remembering a cat sleeping (specifically, recollecting the way the cat looked), perceiving (specifically, seeing) a cat sleeping, and imagining (specifically, visualizing) a cat sleeping are of course importantly different. Nonetheless, from the first-person perspective they are palpably alike. Our first question is.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ruth M. J. Byrne (2005). The Rational Imagination: How People Create Alternatives to Reality. Mit Press.
    A leading scholar in the psychology of thinking and reasoning argues that the counterfactual imagination—the creation of "if only" alternatives to ...
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. R. Caillois & R. Kew (1970). The Logic of Imagination: (Avatars of the Octopus). Diogenes 18 (69):74-98.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Ben Caplan (2004). Creatures of Fiction, Myth, and Imagination. American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (4):331-337.
    In the nineteenth century, astronomers thought that a planet between Mercury and the Sun was causing perturbations in the orbit of Mercury, and they introduced ‘Vulcan’ as a name for such a planet. But they were wrong: there was, and is, no intra-Mercurial planet. Still, these astronomers went around saying things like (2) Vulcan is a planet between Mercury and the Sun. Some philosophers think that, when nineteenth-century astronomers were theorizing about an intra-Mercurial planet, they created a hypothetical planet.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Edward S. Casey (2003). Imagination, Fantasy, Hallucination, and Memory. In J. Philips & James Morley (eds.), Imagination and its Pathologies. MIT Press.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Edward S. Casey (1978). Imagining, Perceiving, and Thinking. Humanitas 14 (May):173-196.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Edward S. Casey (1976). Comparative Phenomenology of Mental Activity: Memory, Hallucination, and Fantasy Contrasted with Imagination. Research in Phenomenology 6 (1):1-25.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. John Casey (1984). Emotion and Imagination. Philosophical Quarterly 34 (134):1-14.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Cornelius Castoriadis (1997). World in Fragments: Writings on Politics, Society, Psychoanalysis, and the Imagination. Stanford University Press.
    This collection presents a broad and compelling overview of the most recent work by a world-renowned figure in contemporary thought. The book is in four parts: Koinonia, Polis, Psyche, Logos. The opening section begins with a general introduction to the author's views on being, time, creation, and the imaginary institution of society and continues with reflections on the role of the individual psyche in racist thinking and acting. The second part is a critique of those who now belittle and distort (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. J. J. Chambliss (1974). Imagination and Reason in Plato, Aristotle, Vico, Rousseau, and Keats. The Hague,Nijhoff.
  38. Joseph Chiari (1970/1961). Realism and Imagination. New York,Gordian Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jinhee Choi (2005). Leaving It Up to the Imagination: POV Shots and Imagining From the Inside. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):17–25.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Elijah Chudnoff (2012). Presentational Phenomenology. In Miguens & Preyer (eds.), Consciousness and Subjectivity. Ontos Verlag.
    A blindfolded clairvoyant walks into a room and immediately knows how it is arranged. You walk in and immediately see how it is arranged. Though both of you represent the room as being arranged in the same way, you have different experiences. Your experience doesn’t just represent that the room is arranged a certain way; it also visually presents the very items in the room that make that representation true. Call the felt aspect of your experience made salient by this (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Jennifer Church (2003). Depression, Depth, and the Imagination. In J. Philips & James Morley (eds.), Imagination and its Pathologies. MIT Press. 335--360.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Joanne B. Ciulla (1996). Business Leadership and Moral Imagination in the Twenty-First Century. In Andrew R. Cecil & W. Lawson Taitte (eds.), Moral Values: The Challenge of the Twenty-First Century. Distributed by the University of Texas Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Elsie Ripley Clapp (1909). Dependence Upon Imagination of the Subject-Object Distinction. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 6 (17):455-460.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. G. Clark (1996). P.C. Miller: Dreaming in Late Antiquity. Studies in the Imagination of a Culture. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1994. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 46 (1):85-86.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Austin Clarkson (2008). The Dialectical Mind : On Educating the Creative Imagination in Elementary School. In Raya A. Jones (ed.), Education and Imagination: Post-Jungian Perspectives. Routledge. 118--141.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Christopher Clausen (1986). The Moral Imagination: Essays on Literature and Ethics. University of Iowa Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Paul Coates (2009). Perception, Imagination and Demonstrative Reference : A Sellarsian Account. In Willem A. DeVries (ed.), Empiricism, Perceptual Knowledge, Normativity, and Realism: Essays on Wilfrid Sellars. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Don Kelly Coble (1997). Nietzsche, the Imagination, and its Multiple Drives. Research in Phenomenology 27 (1):270-277.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. J. M. Cocking (1991). Imagination: A Study in the History of Ideas. Routledge.
    Many writers have paid tribute to its power: Shakespeare urged his audiences to use it to create a setting; Hobbes asserted that "imagination and memory are but one thing;" for Wordsworth it was "the mightiest leveler known to moral world;" and to Baudelaire it represented "the queen of truth." Imagination as artistic, poetic, and cultural predicate remains one of the most influential ideas in the history of Western thought. It (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Mark Coeckelbergh (2007). Principles or Imagination? Two Approaches to Global Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 3 (2):203 – 221.
    What does it mean to introduce the notion of imagination in the discussion about global justice? What is gained by studying the role of imagination in thinking about global justice? Does a focus on imagination imply that we must replace existing influential principle-centred approaches such as that of John Rawls and his critics? We can distinguish between two approaches to global justice. One approach is Rawlsian and Kantian in inspiration. Discussions within this tradition typically focus on the question whether Rawls's (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 233