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  1. Arash Abizadeh (2010). Closed Borders, Human Rights, and Democratic Legitimation. In David Hollenbach (ed.), Driven From Home: Human Rights and the New Realities of Forced Migration. Georgetown University Press.
    Critics of state sovereignty have typically challenged the state’s right to close its borders to foreigners by appeal to the liberal egalitarian discourse of human rights. According to the liberty argument, freedom of movement is a basic human right; according to the equality or justice argument, open borders are necessary to reduce global poverty and inequality, both matters of global justice. I argue that human rights considerations do indeed mandate borders considerably more open than is the norm today but that, (...)
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  2. Arash Abizadeh (2010). Democratic Legitimacy and State Coercion: A Reply to David Miller. Political Theory 38 (1):121-130.
  3. Arash Abizadeh (2008). Democratic Theory and Border Coercion: No Right to Unilaterally Control Your Own Borders. Political Theory 36 (1):37-65.
    The question of whether or not a closed border entry policy under the unilateral control of a democratic state is legitimate cannot be settled until we first know to whom the justification of a regime of control is owed. According to the state sovereignty view, the control of entry policy, including of movement, immigration, and naturalization, ought to be under the unilateral discretion of the state itself: justification for entry policy is owed solely to members. This position, however, is inconsistent (...)
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  4. Arash Abizadeh (2006). Liberal Egalitarian Arguments for Closed Borders: Some Preliminary Critical Reflections. Ethics & Economics 4 (1).
    There are at least five important arguments for why liberal egalitarianism permits states, under today's circumstances, to close their borders to foreigners: the public order, domestic economy, social integration, political threat, and domestic welfare arguments. Critical examination of these arguments suggests that liberal egalitarianism, rather than supporting a right to close one's borders to foreigners, mandates borders considerably more open than is the practice of today's self-styled liberal states.
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  5. Arash Abizadeh, Manish Pandey & Sohrab Abizadeh (forthcoming). Wage Competition and the Special-Obligations Challenge to More Open Borders. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-14544286.
    According to the special-obligations challenge to the justice argument for more open borders, immigration restrictions to wealthier polities are justified because of special obligations owed to disadvantaged compatriots negatively impacted by the immigration of low-skilled foreign workers. We refute the special-obligations challenge by refuting its empirical premise and draw out the normative implications of the empirical evidence for border policies. We show that immigration to wealthier polities has negligible impact on domestic wages and that only previous cohorts of immigrants are (...)
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  6. Frank Adler (2001). Immigration, Insecurity and the French Far Right. Telos 2001 (120):31-48.
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  7. Jaime R. Aguila (2011). The Role of Ethics Within the Contemporary Immigration Debate. Teaching Ethics 11 (2):63-79.
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  8. F. Ainsa & J. Ferguson (1982). Utopia, Promised Lands, Immigration and Exile. Diogenes 30 (119):49-64.
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  9. Meriam N. Alrashid (2008). Comprehensive Immigration Reform: Only as Good as the Bureaucracy It Is Built Upon, The. Nexus 13:29.
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  10. Eleni Andreouli & Caroline Howarth (2013). National Identity, Citizenship and Immigration: Putting Identity in Context. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (3):361-382.
    In this paper we suggest that there is a need to examine what is meant by “context” in Social Psychology and present an example of how to place identity in its social and institutional context. Taking the case of British naturalisation, the process whereby migrants become citizens, we show that the identity of naturalised citizens is defined by common-sense ideas about Britishness and by immigration policies. An analysis of policy documents on “earned citizenship” and interviews with naturalised citizens shows that (...)
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  11. C. Wicksteed Armstrong (1956). Immigration of Coloured Peoples. The Eugenics Review 48 (1):63.
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  12. Monica Aufrecht (2012). Rethinking “Greening of Hate”: Climate Emissions, Immigration, and the Last Frontier. Ethics and the Environment 17 (2):51-74.
    The sheer number of immigrants has simply overwhelmed our country’s ability to continue to provide for newcomers and natives alike, and in many cases has only added to America’s problems… Our population growth … is a root cause of many of the United States’ problems and presents a serious threat to our limited natural resources such as topsoil, forests, clean air and water, and healthy ecosystems. It’s not so much the number of people that matters, but how they live. Concerns (...)
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  13. Roland Axtmann (2009). In Between: Immigration, Distributive Justice, and Political Dialogue. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (4):415-434.
    How is distributive justice possible with respect to immigration if political decisions about entry and membership cannot be grounded in the symmetry of a prior commonality, human or otherwise, that could guarantee reciprocal relations between members and nonmembers? This paper deals with both aspects of this question. Initially, it engages critically with Seyla Benhabib's plea for ‘dialogical universalism,’ showing why the strong discontinuity between political and moral reciprocity precludes understanding distributive justice as the process of mediating between political particularity and (...)
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  14. Veit Bader (2005). The Ethics of Immigration. Constellations 12 (3):331-361.
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  15. Annette C. Baier (1995). A Note on Justice, Care, and Immigration Policy. Hypatia 10 (2):150 - 152.
    Should a "caring" immigration policy give special treatment to would-be immigrants who are near neighbors? It is argued that, while those on our borders requesting entry have some special claim, it should not drown out the claims of more distant applicants for citizenship.
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  16. Celia Bardwell-Jones (2011). The Space Between: The Politics of Immigration in Asian/Pacific Islander America. The Pluralist 5 (3):49-55.
    I would like to thank Dr. Gabaccia for her intriguing essay on the origins of the term "nation of immigrants." It really has helped me think about immigration with more historical richness. In my own work, I examine what goes into transnational and diasporic identities. I understand transnational identities as those operating between the loyalties of two or more countries. Going against perhaps unidirectional ways of understanding the immigrant as a foreigner entering into a country, I understand the immigrant identity (...)
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  17. Elizabeth Batista Wiese, Marina Van Dijk & Hacène Seddik (2009). La matrice familiale dans l'immigration : trauma et résilience. Dialogue 3:67-78.
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  18. Athanasia Batziou (2011). Picturing Immigration: Photojournalistic Representation of Immigrants in Greek and Spanish Press. Intellect Ltd.
    Picturing Immigration offers a comparative study of the photojournalistic framing of immigrants in these two southern European nations, which were recently transformed from senders to receivers of migrants.
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  19. Amir Ben-Porat (1991). Immigration, Proletarianization, and Deproletarianization. Theory and Society 20 (2):233-258.
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  20. Yaacov Ben-Shemesh (2008). Immigration Rights and the Demographic Consideration. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 2 (1):1-34.
    Attaining and maintaining a substantial Jewish majority in Israel has been one of the basic goals of the State of Israel since its early years. A substantial Jewish majority within the borders of the state is thought to be necessary in order to preserve its Jewish nature. Many believe that the demographic consideration also stood behind the enactment of the Citizenship and Entry into Israel Law , 2003, which prohibits granting Israeli citizenship and residency to Palestinians from the West Bank (...)
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  21. Meghan Benton (2010). The Tyranny of the Enfranchised Majority? The Accountability of States to Their Non-Citizen Population. Res Publica 16 (4):397-413.
    The debate between legal constitutionalists and critics of constitutional rights and judicial review is an old and lively one. While the protection of minorities is a pivotal aspect of this debate, the protection of disenfranchised minorities has received little attention. Policy-focused discussion—of the merits of the Human Rights Act in Britain for example—often cites protection of non-citizen migrants, but the philosophical debate does not. Non-citizen residents or ‘denizens’ therefore provide an interesting test case for the theory of rights as trumps (...)
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  22. Peter Billings & Richard A. Edwards, R. (Adam, Limbuela and Tesema) V. Secretary of State for the Home Department: A Case of 'Mountainish Inhumanity'?
    In this article the authors discuss the decision of the House of Lords in Adam, Limbuela and Tesema, where the judges gave detailed scrutiny to the support duty s.55 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 towards those who are seeking asylum and considered the approach to be adopted in determining whether there was an incompatibility with Art.3 of the European Convention on Human Rights if support was denied.
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  23. Laura Bisaillon & Carolyn Ells (2014). When Doctoring is Not About Doctoring: An Ethical Analysis of Practices Associated with Canadian Immigration HIV Testing. Public Health Ethics 7 (3):287-297.
    Immigration medicine and the work carried out by Panel Physicians within the Canadian immigration system give rise to ethically troublesome practices and consequences. In this analysis in three parts, we explore the context of the immigration medical examination, characterize the observed and potential burdens and harms for immigrant and refugee applicants with HIV, and critically assess the possibilities for transforming immigration medical practices and policy to reduce inequities. We use the Code of Ethics of the Canadian Medical Association and the (...)
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  24. Michael Blake (2013). Immigration, Jurisdiction, and Exclusion. Philosophy and Public Affairs 41 (2):103-130.
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  25. Michael Blake (2012). Immigration, Association, and Antidiscrimination. Ethics 122 (4):748-762.
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  26. Michael Blake (2002). Discretionary Immigration. Philosophical Topics 30 (2):273-289.
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  27. Michael Blake & Mathias Risse (2009). Is There a Human Right to Free Movement? Immigration and Original Ownership of the Earth. Notre Dame Journal of Law Ethics and Public Policy 23 (133):166.
    1. Among the most striking features of the political arrangements on this planet is its division into sovereign states.1 To be sure, in recent times, globalization has woven together the fates of communities and individuals in distant parts of the world in complex ways. It is partly for this reason that now hardly anyone champions a notion of sovereignty that would entirely discount a state’s liability the effects that its actions would have on foreign nationals. Still, state sovereignty persists as (...)
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  28. Michael Blake & Mathias Risse (2008). Migration, Territoriality, and Culture. In Ryberg Jesper & Petersen Thomas (eds.), New Waves in Applied Ethics. Palgrave.
    Little work has been done to explore the moral foundations of the state’s right to territory.1 In modern times, the state has mostly been assumed to be a territorial unit, and no need was perceived to reflect on precisely what justifies its territorial jurisdiction. The state’s territoriality is related to another topic that has remained under-theorized: immigration. There is, moreover, an obvious relationship between these topics: the more powerful a state’s rights over its territory, the more powerful the right to (...)
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  29. Walter Block (2011). Hoppe, Kinsella and Rothbard II on Immigration: A Critique. Journal of Libertarian Studies 22 (1):593-623.
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  30. Walter Block (2011). Rejoinder to Hoppe on Immigration. Journal of Libertarian Studies 22:771-792.
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  31. George J. Borjas (2004). The Economic Consequences of Immigration. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 1 (1):137-155.
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  32. G. Bosetti (2011). Introduction: Addressing the Politics of Fear. The Challenge Posed by Pluralism to Europe. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (4):371-382.
    The introduction to this issue is meant to address the ways in which turbulent immigration is challenging European democratic countries’ capacity to integrate the pluralism of cultures in light of the current state of economic instability, strong public debt, unemployment and an aging resident population. The Reset-Dialogues on Civilizations Association has organized its annual Istanbul Seminars in order to fill the need for constructive dialogue dedicated to increasing understanding and implementing social and political change. Turkey’s accession to the European Union (...)
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  33. Linda Bosniak (2013). Amnesty in Immigration: Forgetting, Forgiving, Freedom. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (3):344-365.
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  34. Ahmed Boubeker (2012). Les mondes de l'immigration des héritiers. Multitudes 2:100-110.
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  35. Alberto Burgio (2005). La «guerre des races» et le Nouvel Ordre Européen. Actuel Marx 2 (2):119-133.
    The period we are living through is one of restoration, reminiscent of the 1930s. In a bellicose atmosphere that has proved conducive to an unstable reassertion of imperialism, we have seen a renewed dramatisation of questions of demography and migration, leading to an ethnicisation of social and political relations. Though Europe actually has a structural need of a migrant labour-force, its States have instituted a differential management in dealing with questions of race, depending on the origins of the migrants and (...)
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  36. Philip Cafaro (2014). How Many is Too Many?: The Progressive Argument for Reducing Immigration Into the United States. University of Chicago Press.
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  37. Philip Cafaro & Winthrop Staples Iii (2009). The Environmental Argument for Reducing Immigration Into the United States. Environmental Ethics 31 (1):5-30.
    A serious commitment to environmentalism entails ending America’s population growth and hence a more restrictive immigration policy. The need to limit immigration necessarily follows when we combine a clear statement of our main environmental goals—living sustainably and sharing the landscape generously with nonhuman beings—with uncontroversial accounts of our current demographic trajectory and of the negative environmental effects of U.S. population growth, nationally and globally. Standard arguments for the immigration status quo or for an even more permissive immigration policy are without (...)
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  38. J. Campbell (1962). The Immigration Bill. The Eugenics Review 54 (3):179.
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  39. Daniel Campos (2011). Understanding Immigration as Lived Personal Experience. In Gregory Fernando Pappas (ed.), Pragmatism in the Americas. Fordham University Press. 245-261.
    This essay provides an account of the lived personal experience of immigration at three levels: general aims; relations to place and to other persons; and feelings and sensibility. The account is structured by Charles Peirce's phenomenological categories, but the emphasis is on describing the experience. For the experiential descriptions, the essay also relies on the work of Latin Americans such as Octavio Paz and Mario Benedetti and Anglo Americans such as Henry Thoreau, John McDermott, Jane Addams, and Lara Trout.
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  40. Stacy Caplow (2008). ReNorming Immigration Court. Nexus 13:85.
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  41. Joseph Carens (2013). The Ethics of Immigration. Oup Usa.
    Eminent political theorist Joseph Carens tests the limits of democratic theory in the realm of immigration, arguing that any acceptable immigration policy must be based on moral principles even if it conflicts with the will of the majority.
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  42. Joseph H. Carens (2003). Who Should Get In? The Ethics of Immigration Admissions. Ethics and International Affairs 17 (1):95–110.
    This article explores normative questions about what legal rights settled immigrants should have in liberal democratic states. It argues that liberal democratic justice, properly understood, greatly constrains the distinctions that can be made between citizens and residents.
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  43. Na'ama Carmi (2005). Immigration and Return: The Israeli-Palestinian Case. Philosophia 32 (1-4):21-50.
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  44. Na’Ama Carmi (2008). Immigration Policy: Between Demographic Considerations and Preservation of Culture. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 2 (1):1-29.
    Cultural rights of minority groups are recognized in international human rights law. These rights include the right of minority groups to adopt various measures to protect their cultural identity, which may include closure of the group’s community from outsiders. The state in which such groups reside has a concurrent duty to respect these rights and sometimes even to take positive measures to ensure their implementation. The consideration of demographic factors, then, is regarded as legitimate when designed to protect minority groups. (...)
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  45. Julie Palakovich Carr (2012). Will Lawmakers Reform Immigration Rules for STEM Graduates? BioScience 62 (1):15-15.
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  46. A. M. Carr-Saunders (1913). Immigration and Labour. The Eugenics Review 5 (2):178.
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  47. Eric Cavallero (2006). An Immigration-Pressure Model of Global Distributive Justice. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (1):97-127.
    International borders concentrate opportunities in some societies while limiting them in others. Borders also prevent those in the less favored societies from gaining access to opportunities available in the more favored ones. Both distributive effects of borders are treated here within a comprehensive framework. I argue that each state should have broad discretion under international law to grant or deny entry to immigration seekers; but more favored countries that find themselves under immigration pressure should be legally obligated to fund development (...)
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  48. P. V. Christensen (2003). Immigration and the Nation State. The United States, Germany, and Great Britain. By Christian Joppke. The European Legacy 8 (1):96-96.
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  49. Marisa Silenzi Cianciarulo (2008). Can't Live with'Em, Can't Deport'Em: Why Recent Immigration Reform Efforts Have Failed. Nexus 13:13.
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  50. Sherran Clarence (2009). From Rhetoric to Practice: A Critique of Immigration Policy in Germany Through the Lens of Turkish-Muslim Women's Experiences of Migration. Theoria 56 (121):57-91.
    The largest group of migrants in Germany is the Turkish people, many of whom have low skills levels, are Muslim, and are slow to integrate themselves into their host communities. German immigration policy has been significantly revised since the early 1990s, and a new Immigration Act came into force in 2005, containing more inclusive stances on citizenship and integration of migrants. There is a strong rhetoric of acceptance and open doors, within certain parameters, but the gap between the rhetoric and (...)
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