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  1. Nick Alchin (2003). Bacc to the Future? The Philosophers' Magazine 23 (23):15-16.
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  2. Bruce Aune (1975). Quine on Translation and Reference. Philosophical Studies 27 (4):221 - 236.
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  3. Harry Beatty (1974). Behaviourism, Mentalism, and Quine's Indeterminacy Thesis. Philosophical Studies 26 (2):97 - 110.
  4. P. William Bechtel (1980). Indeterminacy and Underdetermination: Are Quine's Two Theses Consistent? Philosophical Studies 38 (3):309 - 320.
  5. P. William Bechtel (1978). Indeterminacy and Intentionality: Quine's Purported Elimination of Propositions. Journal of Philosophy 75 (November):649-661.
  6. Nick Bostrom, Understanding Quine's Theses of Indeterminacy.
    The state of the art as regards the thesis of indeterminacy of translation is as follows. Very much has been said about it, most of which is based on misunderstandings. No satisfactory formulation of the thesis has been presented. No good argument has been given in favour of the thesis. No good argument has been advanced against it.
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  7. Emile Boutroux (1921). The Immediate Future. International Journal of Ethics 31 (4):370-380.
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  8. M. C. Bradley (1978). More on Kirk and Quine on Underdetermination and Indeterminacy. Analysis 38 (3):150 - 159.
    This paper re-examines an argument of kirk's aimed at refuting quine's inference from the underdetermination of physical theory to the indeterminacy of translation. it is claimed that kirk's argument is unsuccessful; unsuccessful, at any rate, if we make what has seemed until recently the only possible assumption about quine's criterion for individuating theories. but in recent publications quine has proposed a rather different criterion, and in the light of this, it is conceded, kirk's argument may well take effect. it is (...)
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  9. M. C. Bradley (1976). Quine's Arguments for the Indeterminacy Thesis. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):24 – 49.
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  10. M. C. Bradley (1975). Kirk on Indeterminacy of Translation. Analysis 36 (1):18 - 22.
    R kirk ("analysis", volume 33, 1973, pages 195-201) proposes an argument against quine's deduction of indeterminacy of translation from underdetermination of physical theory. the present paper is a reply to kirk, aimed primarily at showing that his argument is "ignoratio elenchi".
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  11. R. D. Bradley (1959). Must the Future Be What It is Going to Be. Mind 68 (270):193-208.
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  12. Alan Bullock (1982). The Past and the Future. University Press of America.
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  13. Steven M. Cahn (2009). Does God Know the Future? In , Exploring Philosophy of Religion: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  14. Charles B. Daniels (1992). Having a Future. Dialogue 31 (04):661-.
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  15. Michael Dummett (1974). The Significance of Quine's Indeterminacy Thesis. Synthese 27 (3-4):351 - 397.
  16. Bruce Edmonds, Indeterminacy: The Mapped, the Navigable, and the Uncharted.
    Determinism is the thesis that a future state is completely determined by a past state of something - thus its future course is fixed when the initial state is given. Before the discovery of quantum mechanics many people thought the universe was deterministic; rather like a huge clock. Indeterminacy is when something is NOT deterministic, that is the initial state does not completely determine all subsequent ones. Indeterminacy is an important topic and doubly so for those involved in social simulation. (...)
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  17. William Edmundson, Liberating the Future From the Past? Liberating the Past From the Future?
    He has two antagonists: the first pushes him from behind, from his origin. The second blocks his road ahead. He struggles with both. Actually the first supports him in his struggle with the second, for the first wants to push him forward; and in the same way the second supports him in his struggle with the first, for the second of course forces him back. But it is only theoretically so. For it is not only the two protagonists who are (...)
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  18. Matti Eklund (2010). Vagueness and Second-Level Indeterminacy. In Richard Dietz & Sebastiano Moruzzi (eds.), Cuts and Clouds: Vaguenesss, its Nature and its Logic. Oup Oxford.
    My theme here will be vagueness. But first recall Quine’s arguments for the indeterminacy of translation and the inscrutability of reference. (I will presume these arguments to be familiar.) If Quine is right, then there are radically different acceptable assignments of semantic values to the expressions of any language: different assignments of semantic values that for all that is determined by whatever it is that determines semantic value are all acceptable, and all equally good. Quine even argued that the indeterminacy (...)
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  19. C. Z. Elgin (1980). Indeterminacy, Underdetermination, and the Anomalism of the Mental. Synthese 45 (2):233 - 255.
    Davidson's token-Token identity theory is based on the indeterminacy of translation. I argue that psychological theories, Like other theories, Are underdetermined by the evidence, And that their reduction, Like other reductions, Is subject to the indeterminacy of translation. This does not invalidate reduction, But it does raise epistemic difficulties. Accepting a claim as law-Like involves uncertainty and risk. There are ideological reasons for thinking that psychophysical reduction involves risks we should not take.
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  20. Camilo Fajardo, Manuela Fernández & David Rey (2009). Manuales de traducción, reinterpretación e indeterminación de la forma lógica. Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 33 (2):87-110.
    In this paper we compare the thesis of underdetermination of theories with the thesis of indeterminacy of translation. Drawing upon this comparison, we argue that, in the context of Quine’s philosophy, the thesis of indeterminacy of translation can only be maintained if it is taken as establishing an indeterminacy in the logical form of sentences. Consequently, we contend that Quine lacks a solid argument for indeterminacy of translation.
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  21. Gerald Feinberg, Shaughan Lavine & David Albert (1992). Knowledge of the Past and Future. Journal of Philosophy 89 (12):607-642.
  22. Dagfinn Foellesdal (1973). Indeterminacy of Translation and Under‐Determination of the Theory of Nature. Dialectica 27 (3‐4):289-301.
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  23. Michael R. Gardner (1973). Apparent Conflicts Between Quine's Indeterminacy Thesis and His Philosophy of Science. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 24 (4):381-393.
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  24. Ken Gemes (1991). The Indeterminacy Thesis Reformulated. Journal of Philosophy 88 (2):91-108.
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  25. Roger F. Gibson (1986). Quine's Dilemma. Synthese 69 (1):27 - 39.
    Quine has long maintained in connection with his theses of under-determination of physical theory and indeterminacy of translation that there is a fact of the matter to physics but no fact of the matter to translation. In this paper, I investigate Quine's reasoning for this claim. I show that Quine's thinking about under-determination over the last twenty-five years has landed him in a contradiction: he says of two global physical theories that are empirically equivalent but logically incompatible that only one (...)
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  26. W. Matthews Grant (2000). Counterfactuals of Freedom, Future Contingents, and the Grounding Objection to Middle Knowledge. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74:307-323.
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  27. Patricia Hanna (1984). Translation, Indeterminacy and Triviality. Philosophia 14 (3-4):341-348.
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  28. Geoffrey Hellman (1974). The New Riddle of Radical Translation. Philosophy of Science 41 (3):227-246.
    This paper presents parts of a theory of radical translation with applications to the problem of construing reference. First, in sections 1 to 4 the general standpoint, inspired by Goodman's approach to induction, is set forth. Codification of sound translational practice replaces the aim of behavioral reduction of semantic notions. The need for a theory of translational projection (manual construction on the basis of a finite empirical correlation of sentences) is established by showing the anomalies otherwise resulting (e.g. from Quine's (...)
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  29. Paul Helm (1993). The Future. International Studies in Philosophy 25 (1):93-93.
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  30. Jaakko Hintikka (1964). The Once and Future Sea Fight: Aristotle's Discussion of Future Contingents in de Interpretatione IX. Philosophical Review 73 (4):461-492.
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  31. Christopher R. Hitchcock (1992). Discussion. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:215-223.
    Gerald Massey has constructed translation manuals for the purposes of illustrating Quine’s Indeterminacy Thesis. Robert Kirk has argued that Massey’s manuals do not live up to their billing. In this note, I will present Massey’s manuals and defend them against Kirk’s objections. The implications for Quine’s Indeterminacy Thesis will then be briefly discussed.
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  32. Christopher R. Hitchcock (1992). Discussion: Massey and Kirk on the Indeterminacy of Translation. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:215-223.
    Gerald Massey has constructed translation manuals for the purposes of illustrating Quine’s Indeterminacy Thesis. Robert Kirk has argued that Massey’s manuals do not live up to their billing. In this note, I will present Massey’s manuals and defend them against Kirk’s objections. The implications for Quine’s Indeterminacy Thesis will then be briefly discussed.
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  33. Jerrold J. Katz (1993). Reply to Gibson. Philosophical Issues 4:174-179.
    This is a reply by J.J. Katz to criticism of his views on Quine's indeterminacy thesis.
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  34. R. Kirk (1973). Underdetermination of Theory and Indeterminacy of Translation. Analysis 33 (6):195 - 201.
    Quine has attempted to support his indeterminacy thesis by invoking the assumption that two different physical theories could both be compatible with all possible data. His argument ought to work even if the translation of non-Theoretical sentences is determinate. But this enables us to see that the underdetermination of theory need not produce any indeterminacy in the translation of theory.
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  35. R. Kirk (1969). Quine's Indeterminacy Thesis. Mind 78 (312):607-608.
  36. Robert Kirk (2004). Indeterminacy of Translation. In Roger F. Gibson (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Quine. Cambridge University Press. 151--180.
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  37. Robert Kirk (1985). Davidson and Indeterminacy of Translation. Analysis 45 (1):20 - 24.
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  38. Robert Kirk (1977). More on Quine's Reasons for Indeterminacy of Translation. Analysis 37 (3):136 - 141.
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  39. Charles Landesman (1970). Scepticism About Meaning: Quine's Thesis of Indeterminacy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 48 (3):320 – 337.
  40. Jean Largeault (1986). Les futurs contingents : déterminisme et prescience. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 91 (4):549 - 559.
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  41. Paul Livingston, Quine's Appeal to Use and the Genealogy of Indeterminacy.
    Quine’s thesis of translational indeterminacy stands as one of the most central, surprising, and influential results of analytic philosophy in the twentieth century. The suggestion that the meaning of linguistic terms and sentences, as shown in the situation of radical translation, is systematically indeterminate and undetermined by actual speech practice, has for decades engendered thought and reflection on the nature and basis of linguistic meaning. And even beyond this surprising moral itself, Quine’s theoretical use of the radical translation scenario has (...)
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  42. Dan López de Sa (2008). Is the Problem of the Many a Problem in Metaphysics? Noûs 42 (4):746 - 752.
    Kilimanjaro is a paradigmatic mountain, if any is. Consider atom Sparky, which is neither determinately part of Kilimanjaro nor determinately not part of it. Let Kilimanjaro(+) be the body of land constituted, in the way mountains are constituted by their constituent atoms, by the atoms that make up Kilimanjaro together with Sparky, and Kilimanjaro(–) the one constituted by those other than Sparky. On the one hand, there seems to be just one mountain in the vicinity of Kilimanjaro. On the other (...)
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  43. Lukas H. Meyer (2003). Past and Future. In Lukas H. Meyer, Stanley L. Paulson & Thomas W. Pogge (eds.), Rights, Culture and the Law: Themes From the Legal and Political Philosophy of Joseph Raz. Oup Oxford.
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  44. Stephen Neale (1987). Meaning, Grammar, and Indeterminacy. Dialectica 41 (4):301-319.
    SummaryIt is a mistake to think that Quine's thesis of the indeterminacy of translation reduces to the claim that théories are under‐determined by evidence. The theory of meaning is subject to an indeterminacy that is qualitatively different from the under‐determination of scientific théories. However, there is no reason to believe that the indeterminacy thesis extends beyond translation and meaning, and hence no construal of the thesis prevents one from being a realist about grammars, construed as partial théories of mind.
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  45. Calvin G. Normore (1993). Petrus Aureoli and His Contemporaries on Future Contingents and Excluded Middle. Synthese 96 (1):83 - 92.
  46. James E. O'Neill (1937). The Future of Bolshevisrn. New Scholasticism 11 (3):248-249.
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  47. Benjamin E. Park & Tattered Passport (forthcoming). The Past and Future Boundaries of Mormon Studies. Dialogue.
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  48. Lorenzo Peña (1988). Indeterminacy of Translation as Hermeneutic Doctrine. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 62:212-224.
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  49. Philip L. Peterson (1984). Semantic Indeterminacy and Scientific Underdetermination. Philosophy of Science 51 (3):464-487.
    Some critics believe Quine's semantic indeterminacy (indeterminacy of radical translation at home as well as abroad) thesis is true, but innocent, since it is just scientific underdetermination in linguistics. The Quinean reply is that in scientific underdetermination cases there are facts of the matter making claims true or false (whether knowable or not), whereas in semantic indeterminacy cases there simply are not. The critics' rejoinder that there are such facts, studied in linguistics, is met by the final reply that linguistics (...)
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  50. A. N. Prior (1953). Three-Valued Logic and Future Contingents. Philosophical Quarterly 3 (13):317-326.
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