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  1. Aditya Adarkar (2005). The Untested Dharma is Not Worth Living. International Journal of Hindu Studies 9 (1-3):117-130.
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  2. Mikael Aktor (2002). Rules of Untouchability in Ancient and Medieval Law Books: Householders, Competence, and Inauspiciousness. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 6 (3):243-274.
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  3. Douglas Allen (2007). Mahatma Gandhi on Violence and Peace Education. Philosophy East and West 57 (3):290-310.
    : Gandhi can serve as a valuable catalyst allowing us to rethink our philosophical positions on violence, nonviolence, and education. Especially insightful are Gandhi's formulations of the multidimensionality of violence, including educational violence, and the violence of the status quo. His peace education offers many possibilities for dealing with short-term violence, but its greatest strength is its long-term preventative education and socialization. Key to Gandhi's peace education are his ethical and ontological formulations of means-ends relations; the need to uncover root (...)
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  4. Anant Sadashiv Altekar (1952). Sources of Hindu Dharma in its Socio-Religious Aspects. Sholapur, Institute of Public Administration.
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  5. Christopher R. Austin (2009). Janamejaya's Last Question. Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (6):597-625.
    This article examines closely an important passage at the conclusion of the Mahābhārata wherein the final state of the epic heroes after death is defined. The Critical Edition’s phrasing of what precisely became of the characters once they arrived in heaven is unclear, and manuscript variants offer two apparently contradictory readings. In this article I present evidence in support of one of these readings, and respond to the Mahābhārata ’s seventeenth century commentator Nīlakaṇṭha Caturdhara, who champions the other. Underlying and (...)
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  6. Albion Rajkumar Banerji (1940). The Rhythm of Living. London, Rider & Co..
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  7. Surendra Sheodas Barlingay (1998). A Modern Introduction to Indian Ethics: My Impressions of Indian Moral Problems and Concepts. Penman Publishers.
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  8. Michael G. Barnhart (2012). Theory and Comparison in the Discussion of Buddhist Ethics. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):16-43.
    Comparisons, and by that I mean the hunt for essential similarities or at least serious family resemblances, between the ethical views of Western and non-Western thinkers have been a staple of comparative philosophy for quite some time now. Some of these comparisons, such as between the views of Aristotle and Confucius, seem especially apt and revealing. However, I’ve often wondered whether Western “ethical theory”—virtue ethics, deontology, or consequentialism—is always the best lens through which to approach non-Western ethical thought. Particularly when (...)
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  9. Jacob N. Bauer (2014). Gandhian Nonviolence and the Problem of Preferable Violence. Acorn 15 (1):26-32.
    In this article, I argue that Gandhi can prefer violence in cases, but still morally object to all forms of violence. Even though this can seem to be a contradiction, nonetheless, one can prefer an action without thinking that action is morally justified. Next, I explore the objection that preferring a violent act, such as violent self-defense, over a act that is not violent, such as running away, seems to prefer an action that is more violent to one that is (...)
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  10. Nicolas Bommarito (2011). Bile & Bodhisattvas: Śāntideva on Justified Anger. Journal of Buddhist Ethics 18:357-81.
    In his famous text the Bodhicaryāvatāra, the 8th century Buddhist philosopher Śāntideva argues that anger towards people who harm us is never justified. The usual reading of this argument rests on drawing similarities between harms caused by persons and those caused by non-persons. After laying out my own interpretation of Śāntideva's reasoning, I offer some objections to Śāntideva's claim about the similarity between animate and inanimate causes of harm inspired by contemporary philosophical literature in the West. Following this, I argue (...)
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  11. Jagdish Chander & K. B. (1975). Moral Values, Attitudes and Moods: A Book on Ethics for a New World Order. Prajapita Brahma Kumaris Ishwariya Vishwa-Vidyalaya.
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  12. I. P. Chelysheva (1989). Ethical Ideas in the World Outlook of Swami Vivekananda, Lokamanya B.G. Tilak, and Aurobindo Ghose. Vostok.
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  13. Stephen Clark (2010). Ethical Thought in India. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.
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  14. Tim Connolly (2013). Ethics of Compassion: Buddhist Karuṇā and Confucian Ren. In Ithamar Theodor Zhihua Yao (ed.), Brahman and Dao: Comparative Studies of Indian and Chinese Philosophy and Religion. Lexington Books.
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  15. Christian Coseru (2008). A Review of Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics. [REVIEW] Sophia 47 (1):75-77.
    Simon P. James' Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics offers an engaging, sophisticated, and well-argued defence of the notion that Zen Buddhism has something positive to offer the environmental movement. James' goal is two-fold: first, dispel criticism that Zen (by virtue of its anti-philosophical stance) lacks an ethical program (because it shuns conventional morality), has no concern for the environment at large (because it adopts a thoroughly anthropocentric stance), and deprives living entities of any intrinsic worth (because it operates from the (...)
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  16. S. Cromwell Crawford (1995). Dilemmas of Life and Death Hindu Ethics in North American Context. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  17. S. Cromwell Crawford (1989). Hindu Ethics for Modern Life. In , World Religions and Global Ethics. Paragon House Publishers.
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  18. S. Cromwell Crawford (1974). The Evolution of Hindu Ethical Ideals. Firma K. L. Mukhopadhyay.
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  19. Austin B. Creel (1977). Contemporary Hindu Ethics. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 51:105-111.
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  20. Austin B. Creel (1977). The Modern Study of Hindu Ethics. International Philosophical Quarterly 17 (4):445-454.
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  21. Austin B. Creel (1975). The Reexamination of "Dharma" in Hindu Ethics. Philosophy East and West 25 (2):161-173.
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  22. Gurusadaẏa Datta (2008). Gurusadaẏa Datta Nirbācita Racanāsaṃgraha. Punaśca.
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  23. Gurusadaẏa Datta (1981). The Bratachāri Synthesis. Bengal Bratachari Society.
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  24. Krishna Del Toso (2008). The Role of Puñña and Kusala in the Dialectic of the Twofold Right Vision and the Temporary Integration of Eternalism in the Path Towards Spiritual Emancipation According to the Pāli Nikāyas. Esercizi Filosofici 3:32-58.
    Abstract: This article shows how in the Pāli Nikāyas, after having defined Eternalism and Nihilism as two opposed positions, Gotama makes a dialectical use of Eternalism as means to eliminate Nihilism, upheld to be the worst point of view because of its denial of kammic maturation in terms of puñña and pāpa. Assuming, from an Eternalist perspective, that actions have effects also beyond the present life, Gotama underlines the necessity of betting on the validity of moral kammic retribution. Having thus (...)
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  25. Vasant Govind[from old catalog] Deshmukh (1944). Thus I Live. [Bombay, Popular Book Depot.
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  26. Christopher G. Framarin (2014). HInduism and Environmental Ethics: Law, Literature, and Philosophy. Routledge.
    ... the Earth, San Francisco, CA: Sierra Club Books. Hill Jr., T. (2006)aFinding Value inNature«, Environmental Values 15(3): 331¥41. ¦¦(1983) aIdeals of Human Excellence and Preserving Natural Environments«, Environmental Ethics 5(3): ...
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  27. Ganeshdas (1991). Katha-Ratnam. Shri Sadhubella Udasin Ashram.
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  28. Balbir Singh Gauchhwal (1966). The Metaphysical Foundations of Hindu Ethics and Religion. Philosophy East and West 16 (3/4):143-159.
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  29. Nicholas F. Gier, Dharma Morality As Virtue Ethics.
    consequentialism."[2] Whereas it is virtually impossible to do the hedonic calculus for ordinary pains and pleasures, there is no question about the long term good consequences of the virtues and good character, as compared to the long term pain that the vices bring. This means that attempts, such as <span class='Hi'>Michael</span> Slote's gallant..
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  30. Pradīpa Gokhale & S. E. Bhelke (eds.) (2002). Studies in Indian Moral Philosophy: Problems, Concepts, and Perspectives. Published by Indian Philosophical Quarterly Publication, Dept. Of Philosophy, University of Pune for U.G.C. Dept. Of Special Assistance Programme, Phase I & Ii.
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  31. Bina Gupta (2006). Bhagavad G?Tā as Duty and Virtue Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (3):373-395.
    The paper examines the ethical conception of the most well-known and much discussed Hindu text, the "Bhagavad Gītā", in the context of the Western distinction between duty ethics and virtue ethics. Most of the materials published on the "Gītā" make much of its conception of duty; however, there is no systematic investigation of the notion of virtue in the "Gītā". The paper begins with a discussion of the fundamental characteristics of virtue ethics, before undertaking a discussion of the conceptions of (...)
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  32. Stephen E. Harris (2014). Suffering and the Shape of Well-Being in Buddhist Ethics. Asian Philosophy 24 (3):242-259.
    This article explores the defense Indian Buddhist texts make in support of their conceptions of lives that are good for an individual. This defense occurs, largely, through their analysis of ordinary experience as being saturated by subtle forms of suffering . I begin by explicating the most influential of the Buddhist taxonomies of suffering: the threefold division into explicit suffering , the suffering of change , and conditioned suffering . Next, I sketch the three theories of welfare that have been (...)
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  33. Maria Heim (2005). Differentiations in Hindu Ethics. In William Schweiker (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Religious Ethics. Blackwell Pub.. 341--354.
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  34. Edward Washburn Hopkins (1924/1968). Ethics of India. Port Washington, N.Y.,Kennikat Press.
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  35. Kamala Jain (1983). The Concept of Pañcaśīla in Indian Thought. P.V. Research Institute.
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  36. Kusuma Jaina (ed.) (2004). Foundations of Indian Moral Thought. Dept. Of Philosophy, University of Rajasthan.
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  37. Marzenna Jakubczak (2014). The Purpose of Non-Theistic Devotion in the Classical Indian Tradition of Sāṃkhya–Yoga. ARGUMENT 4 (1):55-68.
    The paper starts with some textual distinctions concerning the concept of God in the metaphysical framework of two classical schools of Hindu philosophy, Sāṃkhya and Yoga. Then the author focuses on the functional and pedagogical aspects of prayer as well as practical justification of “religious meditation” in both philosophical schools. A special attention is put on the practice called īśvarapraṇidhāna, recommended in Yoga school, which is interpreted by the author as a form of non-theistic devotion. The meaning of the central (...)
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  38. Saral Jhingran (1989). Aspects of Hindu Morality. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
    Chapter HINDUISM THROUGH THE AGES /. Intimate Relation between Religion, Philosophy and Ethics in Hinduism As observed in the preface, the present work ...
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  39. B. R. Kulkarni (1974). Lokmanya Tilak's Metaphysic of Morals. University of Poona.
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  40. Lilia Lender (ed.) (1987). The Choice is Yours: Ethics in Vedanta. Central Chinmaya Mission Trust.
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  41. Sushil Kumar Maitra (1927). The Ethics of the Hindus. Philosophical Review 36:394.
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  42. Susil Kumar Maitra (1925/1978). The Ethics of Hindus. Asian Publication Services.
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  43. Barnes L. Mawrie (2005). Introduction to Khasi Ethics. Dbcic Publications.
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  44. John McKenzie (1971). Hindu Ethics. New Delhi,Oriental Books Reprint Corp.; Exclusively Distributed by Munshiram Manoharlal.
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  45. John McKenzie (1922/2006). Hindu Ethics: A Historical and Critical Essay. Martino Pub..
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  46. Anne E. Monius (2005). Origins of Hindu Ethics. In William Schweiker (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Religious Ethics. Blackwell Pub.. 330--40.
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  47. Santosha Kumāra Pāṇḍeya (2007). Prācīna Bhāratīya Ācāra-Mīmāṃsā: Niruktakālīna Bhārata Ke Sandarbha Meṃ. Prabodha Saṃskr̥ta Prakāśana.
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  48. Suniti Kumar Pathak (1974). The Indian Nītiśastras in Tibet. Motilalbanarsidass.
    Suniti Kumar Pathak. Chapter II INDO-TIBETAN CULTURAL CONTACT Regarding the earliest reference of the Indo-Tibetan cultural contact the Tibetan chronicles mention the miraculous appearance of the Indian Buddhistic scriptures Za-ma ...
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  49. S. H. Phillips (2001). Hindu Ethics. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (3):428 – 429.
    Book Information Hindu Ethics. By Roy Perrett. University of Hawaii Press. Honolulu. 1998. Pp. xi + 105. Paperback, US$28.00.
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  50. Joseph Prabhu (2005). Trajectories of Hindu Ethics. In William Schweiker (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Religious Ethics. Blackwell Pub.. 355--367.
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