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  1. Ashok Aklujkar (1989). Sa Dot Mdot Mbandha and Abhisa Dot Mdot Mbandha. Journal of Indian Philosophy 17 (3).
    The few abbreviations employed in the body of the article are explained in the bibliography.
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  2. R. Anitha (2010). Bhartrhari's Vākyapadīya: Its Linguistic and Literary Implications with Special Reference to Modern English Poetry. Sukr̥tīndra Oriental Research Institute.
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  3. Dan Arnold (2006). On Semantics and Saṃketa: Thoughts on a Neglected Problem with Buddhist Apoha Doctrine. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (5):415-478.
    “...a theory of meaning for a particular language should be conceived by a philosopher as describing the practice of linguistic interchange by speakers of the language without taking it as already understood what it is to have a language at all: that is what, by imagining such a theory, we are trying to make explict." – Michael Dummer (2004: 31).
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  4. Saroja Bhate & Johannes Bronkhorst (eds.) (1992). Bhartr̥hari, Philosopher and Grammarian: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Bhartr̥hari (University of Poona, January 6-8, 1992). [REVIEW] Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
    This is the reason why an international conference on Bhartrhari was organized in January 1992 in Pune, under the joint auspices of the University of Poons and ...
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  5. B. K. Matilal & P. K. Sen (1988). The Context Principle and Some Indian Controversies Over Meaning. Mind 97 (385):73-97.
  6. Kailāśa Pati Miśra (2006). Śabdādvaita Darśana: Bhartr̥hari Kā Darśana. Kalā Prakāśana.
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  7. Tandra Patnaik (1994). Śabda, a Study of Bhartr̥hari's Philosophy of Language. D.K. Printworld.
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  8. Gayatri Rath (2000). Linguistic Philosophy in Vākyapadīya. Bharatiya Vidya Prakashan.
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  9. Gaurinath Bhattacharyya Shastri (1991). The Philosophy of Bhartr̥hari. Bharatiya Vidya Prakashan.
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  10. Devendra Nath Tiwari (2008). The Central Problems of Bhartr̥hari's Philosophy. Indian Council of Philosophical Research.
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Vyakarana/Grammar
  1. Akihiko Akamatsu (1999). The Two Kinds of anumĀNa in Bhartrhari's VĀkyapadĪya. Journal of Indian Philosophy 27 (1/2):17-22.
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  2. Ashok Aklujkar (2004). Can the Grammarians'Dharma Be a Dharma for All? Journal of Indian Philosophy 32 (5-6):687-732.
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  3. Ashok Aklujkar (2001). The Word is the World: Nondualism in Indian Philosophy of Language. Philosophy East and West 51 (4):452-473.
    The meanings in which the word "word" can be taken, the interpretations that the relevant meanings would necessitate of the "word-equals-world" thesis, and the extent to which Bhartṛhari can be said to be aware of or receptive to these interpretations are considered. The observation that more than one interpretation would have been acceptable to Bhartṛhari naturally leads to a discussion of his notion of truth, his perspectivism, and his understanding of the nature of philosophizing as an activity in which language (...)
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  4. Emilie Aussant (2007). A Case of Vyākaraṇic Oxymoroṇ: The Notion of Anvarthasaṃjñā. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (2):133-147.
    The anvartha-saṃjñā compound associates two contradictory terms: anvartha, which means “[used] in conformity with his [etymological/first] meaning”, and saṃjñā which implies the idea of a convention; it therefore appears to be quite intriguing. The question is: is it relevant to focus on this contradiction or is it only a false problem? The aim of this paper is to answer the above question and this implies to grasp somewhat better the use of this notion by the Pāṇinian grammarians. To do so, (...)
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  5. Shriniwas Hemade (2014). तत्त्वज्ञान, ब्रह्मज्ञान आणि दर्शन Tattvanjan, Brahmjnan and Darsan. In Girish Kuber & Abhijit Tamhane (eds.), Article in weekly column daily Loksatta in Maharashtra (Indian Express Group). Indian Express Group. 6.
    तत्त्वज्ञान, ब्रह्मज्ञान आणि दर्शन is the 13 article of the weekly column in Daily Loksatta, Marathi publication of Indian Express Group India. The Column is entitled as Tattvabhan तत्त्वभान – A Philosophical Counsciousness. Present article is published on 27th March 2014, explains the meaning and usage of the three terms mentioned in the Title. – Dr. Shriniwas Hemade – Author, shriniwas.sh@gmail.com.
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  6. Chien-Hsing Ho (2014). Meaning, Understanding, and Knowing-What: An Indian Grammarian Notion of Intuition (Pratibha). Philosophy East and West 64 (2):404-424.
    For Bhartrhari, a fifth-century Indian grammarian-philosopher, all conscious beings—beasts, birds and humans—are capable of what he called pratibha, a flash of indescribable intuitive understanding such that one knows what the present object “means” and what to do with it. Such an understanding, if correct, amounts to a mode of knowing that may best be termed knowing-what, to distinguish it from both knowing-that and knowing-how. This paper attempts to expound Bhartrhari’s conception of pratibha in relation to the notions of meaning, understanding, (...)
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  7. Chien-Hsing Ho (2006). Saying the Unsayable. Philosophy East and West 56 (3):409-427.
    A number of traditional philosophers and religious thinkers advocated an ineffability thesis to the effect that the ultimate reality cannot be expressed as it truly is by human concepts and words. However, if X is ineffable, the question arises as to how words can be used to gesture toward it. We can't even say that X is unsayable, because in doing so, we would have made it sayable. In this article, I examine the solution offered by the fifth-century Indian grammarian-philosopher (...)
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Nirukta/Etyomology
  1. Shriniwas Hemade (2014). तत्त्वज्ञान, ब्रह्मज्ञान आणि दर्शन Tattvanjan, Brahmjnan and Darsan. In Girish Kuber & Abhijit Tamhane (eds.), Article in weekly column daily Loksatta in Maharashtra (Indian Express Group). Indian Express Group. 6.
    तत्त्वज्ञान, ब्रह्मज्ञान आणि दर्शन is the 13 article of the weekly column in Daily Loksatta, Marathi publication of Indian Express Group India. The Column is entitled as Tattvabhan तत्त्वभान – A Philosophical Counsciousness. Present article is published on 27th March 2014, explains the meaning and usage of the three terms mentioned in the Title. – Dr. Shriniwas Hemade – Author, shriniwas.sh@gmail.com.
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Indian Linguistic Philosophy, Misc
  1. Akihiko Akamatsu (1999). The Two Kinds of anumĀNa in Bhartrhari's VĀkyapadĪya. Journal of Indian Philosophy 27 (1/2):17-22.
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  2. Nilanjan Das (2011). Lakṣaṇā as Inference. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (4-5):353-366.
    This paper questions a few assumptions of Gaṅgeśa Upādhyāya’s theory of ordinary verbal cognition (laukika-śābdabodha). The meaning relation (vṛtti) is of two kinds: śakti (which gives us the primary referent of a word) and lakṣaṇā (which yields the secondary referent). For Gaṅgeśa, the ground (bīja) of lakṣaṇā is a sort of inexplicability (anupapatti) pertaining to the composition (anvaya) of word-meanings. In this connection, one notices that the case of lakṣaṇā is quite similar to that of one variety of postulation, namely, (...)
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  3. Marzenna Jakubczak (2011). The Collision of Language and Metaphysics in the Search of Self-Identity: On Ahaṃkāra and Asmitā in Sāṃkhya-Yoga. ARGUMENT 1 (1):37-48.
    The author of this paper discusses some major points vital for two classical Indian schools of philosophy: (1) a significant feature of linguistic analysis in the Yoga tradition; (2) the role of the religious practice (iśvara-pranidhana) in the search for true self-identity in Samkhya and Yoga darśanas with special reference to their gnoseological purposes; and (3) some possible readings of ‘ahamkara’ and ‘asmita’ displayed in the context of Samkhya-Yoga phenomenology and metaphysics. The collision of language and metaphysics refers to the (...)
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  4. Desh Raj Sirswal (2012). Methods of Philosophical Inquiry in Upanishads. International Journal of Multidisciplinary Educational Research 1 (2):57-62.
    Philosophy is a subject which does not concerned only to an expert or specialist. It appears that there is probably no human being who does not philosophise. Good philosophy expands one’s imagination as some philosophy is close to us, whoever we are. Then of course some is further away, and some is further still, and some is very alien indeed. We raise questions about the assumptions, presuppositions, or definitions upon which a field of inquiry is based, and these questions can (...)
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  5. Sonam Thakchoe (2012). Prasangika's Semantic Nominalism: Reality is Linguistic Concept. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (4):427-452.
    Buddhist semantic realists assert that reality is always non-linguistic, beyond the domain of conceptual thought. Anything that is conceptual and linguistic, they maintain, cannot be reality and therefore cannot function as reality.The Pra¯san˙gika however rejects the realist theory and argues that all realities are purely linguistic—just names and concepts—and that only linguistic reality can have any causal function. This paper seeks to understand the Pra¯san˙gika’s radical semantic nominalism and its philosophical justifications by comparing and contrasting it with the realistic semantic (...)
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