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  1. Abhedānanda (1967). Complete Works of Swami Abhedananda. Calcutta, Ramakrishna Vedanta Math.
  2. Tanaji Acharya (1990). Relevance of Indian Philosophy to Modern Society. Distributor, Indo-Vision.
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  3. Anand Amaladass (ed.) (1995). Christian Contribution to Indian Philosophy. Christian Literature Society.
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  4. Roger T. Ames (2004). Call for Papers ``Educations and Their Purposes: A Philosophical Dialogue Among Cultures'' Ninth East-West Philosophers' Conference University of Hawai'i East-West Center May 29–June 11, 2005. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 32 (2/3):293-294.
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  5. Ashokananda (1931). The Influence of Indian Thought on the Thought of the West. Mayavati, Almora, U.P., Advaita Ashrama.
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  6. Pratima Asthana (1992). The Indian View of History. M.G. Publishers.
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  7. Svāmī Ātmajñānānanda (1997). Scandals, Cover-Ups, and Other Imagined Occurrences in the Life of Rāmakṙṣṅa: An Examination of Jeffrey Kripal's Kālī's Child. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 1 (2):401-420.
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  8. Greg Bailey (2007). On the Definition of a Hindu World and its Portrayal: A Review Article. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 11 (1):99-114.
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  9. Maṅṅāṭ Bālacandran (2011). Manassuṃ Ātmīyatayuṃ. Ḍi. Si. Buks.
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  10. R. Balasubramanian (1998). T.M.P. Mahadevan. Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.
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  11. R. Balasubramanian (ed.) (1994). Facets of Recent Indian Philosophy. Distributed by Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.
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  12. Rudolph Bauer (2012). The Appearance of Emptiness Through Time. Transmission 4.
    This paper focuses on the appearance of emptiness through time.
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  13. Monima Chadha (2010). Perceptual Experience and Concepts in Classical Indian Philosophy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  14. Arindam Chakrabarti (2011). Troubles with a Second Self: The Problem of Other Minds in 11th Century Indian and 20th Century Western Philosophy. ARGUMENT 1 (1):23-35.
    In contemporary Western analytic philosophy, the classic analogical argument explaining our knowledge of other minds has been rejected. But at least three alternative positive theories of our knowledge of the second person have been formulated: the theory-theory, the simulation theory and the theory of direct empathy. After sketching out the problems faced by these accounts of the ego’s access to the contents of the mind of a “second ego”, this paper tries to recreate one argument given by Abhinavagupta (Shaiva philosopher (...)
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  15. Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Four.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: What can Indian philosophy tell us about how we perceive the world?
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  16. Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report.
    This report highlights and explores five questions that arose from the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, September 21st to 22nd, 2013: 1. How does the understanding of attention in Indian philosophy bear on contemporary western debates? 2. How can we train our attention, and what are the benefits of doing so? 3. Can meditation give us moral knowledge? 4. What can Indian philosophy tell us about how we perceive the world? 5. Are there cross-cultural (...)
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  17. Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question One.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This part of the report explores the question: How does the understanding of attention in Indian philosophy bear on contemporary western debates?
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  18. Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Two.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: How can we train our attention, and what are the benefits of doing so?
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  19. Matthew R. Dasti (forthcoming). Skepticism in Classical Indian Philosophy. In Diego Machuca & Baron Reed (eds.), Skepticism from Antiquity to the Present.
    There are some tantalizing suggestions that Pyrrhonian skepticism has its roots in ancient India. Of them, the most important is Diogenes Laertius’s report that Pyrrho accompanied Alexander to India, where he was deeply impressed by the character of the “naked sophists” he encountered (DL IX 61). Influenced by these gymnosophists, Pyrrho is said to have adopted the practices of suspending judgment on matters of belief and cultivating an indifferent composure amid the vicissitudes of ordinary life. Such conduct, and the attitudes (...)
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  20. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2009). Limitations and Alternatives: Understanding Indian Philosophy. Calicut University Research Journal, ISSN No. 09723348 (1):47-58.
    This paper attempts to articulate certain inadequacies that are involved in the traditional way of categorizing Indian philosophy and explores alternative approaches, some of which otherwise are not explicitly seen in the treatises of the history of Indian Philosophies. By categorization, I mean, classifying Indian philosophy into two streams, which are traditionally called as astica and nastica or orthodox and heterodox systems. Further, these different schools in the astica Darsanas and nastica Darsanas are usually numbered into six and three respectively. (...)
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  21. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2009). Richness of Indian Symbolism and Changing Perspectives. In Paata Chkheidze, Hoang Thi To & Yaroslav Pasko (eds.), Symbols in Cultures and Identities in a Time of Global Interaction.
    My aim in this paper is to explicate the diversity of Indian Symbolism and to show the changing patterns of symbols. The first part is mostly descriptive and interpretative and tries to bring out the different forms of Indian Symbolism. The second part tries to bring out the different kinds of changes that are possible with regard to symbols.
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  22. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2008-09). The Argumentative Tradition in Indian Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy, Culture and Traditions 5:173-186.
    A spirit of disintegration and disunity is conspicuous on the contemporary social, as well as philosophical scene. There is a celebration of fragments and differences. In such a scenario, no less than a person like Amartya Sen, an eminent economist and a Noble Laureate rose to the occasion and traced out the roots and the space for a democratic discourse that has been sustained in the Indian philosophical tradition. It is laudable that he opened up a discussion that will strengthen (...)
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  23. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2008). Dana: A Foundation of the Indian Social Life. In Sebastian Vt & Geeta Manakatala (eds.), Foundations of Indian Life: Cultural, Religious and Aesthetic Edited by ISBN. 1439201854. Booksurge.
    This paper discusses the concept of Dána or charity as the foundation of Indian Social life. Dána has been in vogue in India since the Vedic times, but it was codified by the smritis which prescribe do’s and don’ts of the life of the individual. Limiting its scope to Yagnavalkya smriti the paper analyses the significance of Dána as a regulative principle of accumulation of wealth.
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  24. Christopher G. Framarin (2014). HInduism and Environmental Ethics: Law, Literature, and Philosophy. Routledge.
    ... the Earth, San Francisco, CA: Sierra Club Books. Hill Jr., T. (2006)aFinding Value inNature«, Environmental Values 15(3): 331¥41. ¦¦(1983) aIdeals of Human Excellence and Preserving Natural Environments«, Environmental Ethics 5(3): ...
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  25. Philomène Harrison (1970). The Indian Mind: Essentials of Indian Philosophy and Culture, And: The Chinese Mind: Essentials of Chinese Philosophy and Culture, And: The Japanese Mind: Essentials of Japanese Philosophy and Culture (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (1):115-121.
  26. Betty Heimann (1926). Vergleich der Antithesen europäischen und indischen Denkens. Kant-Studien 31 (1-3):549-562.
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  27. Betty Heimann (1925). Zur Struktur des indischen Denkens. Kant-Studien 30 (1-2):1-22.
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  28. H. Herring (1998). Indian Philosophy? Some Notes and Suggestions for an Approach (Kant). Kant-Studien 89 (3):353-362.
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  29. Herbert Herring (1979). Zur Rezeption deutscher Philosophie im zeitgenössischen indischen Denken. Kant-Studien 70 (1-4):225-231.
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  30. Marzenna Jakubczak (2005). Yoga: The Indian Tradition (Review). Philosophy East and West 55 (2):353-358.
                      Book review: Yoga: The Indian Tradition. Edited by Ian Whicher and David Carpenter. London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003, Pp. xii + 206     -/-  .
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  31. Marzenna Jakubczak (2004). Towards Knowing Ourselves: Classical Yoga Perspective. Journal of Human Values 10 (2):111-116.
    Self-knowledge, at first glance, seems to be naturally and easily accessible to each of us. We commonly believe that we need much less effort to understand ourselves than to understand the world. The authoress of the paper uncovers the fallacy of this popular view referring to the fundamental conceptions and philosophical ideas of the classical Yoga. She tries to demystify our deceptive self-understanding explaining the definitions of ignorance (avidya), I-am-ness (asmita), desire (raga), aversion (dvesha) and fear of death (abhinivesha) given (...)
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  32. Sanjay Lal (2008). Gandhi's Universal Ethic and Feminism: Shared Starting Points but Divergent Ends. Asian Philosophy 18 (2):185 – 195.
    Like the dominant moral philosophers in the Western tradition, Mahatma Gandhi reaches moral conclusions that emphasize universality, impartiality, and detachment. This is in apparent contrast to feminist philosophers who have put forth a scheme for reaching moral conclusions that gives centrality to feeling, experience, and interdependence. In the following, I show that Gandhi shares significant agreement with feminists in spite of the kinds of moral conclusions he reaches. The crucial difference between Gandhi and the feminist critics lies in how the (...)
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  33. Vinay Lal (2000). Gandhi and the Ecological Vision of Life. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):149-168.
    Although recognized as one of the principal sources of inspiration for the Indian environmental movement, Gandhi would have been profoundly uneasy with many of the most radical strands of ecology in the West, such as social ecology, ecofeminism, and even deep ecology. He was in every respect an ecological thinker, indeed an ecological being: the brevity of his enormous writings, his everyday bodily practices, his observance of silence, his abhorrence of waste, and his cultivation of the small as much as (...)
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  34. Domenic Marbaniang (2012). Hermeneutics of Religion. Journal of the Contemporary Christian 4 (3).
    To have a theory of religion before studying religion would make the study superfluous unless there is openness for change, openness for new horizons emerging. However, we need to understand that contextual meaningfulness is not the same as relativism. The search for a common framework presupposes the reality of and possibility of the same. Men can determine the rules of a particular language-game; but, they cannot create the laws of logic. So, while hermeneutics must pay attention to both content and (...)
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  35. Steven A. Miller (2013). Consonances Between Indian Thought and Josiah Royce's Developing Absolute. The Pluralist 8 (2):60-77.
    Few American thinkers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were acquainted with Eastern traditions of thought. Early Transcendentalists, including Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, were happy exceptions to this, with each showing passing familiarity of and an approving attitude toward the Bhagavad-Gita and other early Vedic texts. Other thinkers of the period, including Walt Whitman and Bronson Alcott, were influenced to varying degrees by Indian thought. Despite this limited fascination with the intellectual traditions of the East, rare (...)
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  36. Ulrich Mohrhoff (2008). Indian Psychology's Coming of Age. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (5):121-126.
    Report on the National Seminar on Indian Psychology, Bangalore, December 2007, jointly organized by the Indian Council of Philosophical Research and the Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana.
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  37. Andrew J. Nicholson (2014). Lord Siva's Song: The Isvara Gita. State University of New York Press.
    While the Bhagavad Gītā is an acknowledged treasure of world spiritual literature, few people know a parallel text, the Īśvara Gītā. This lesser-known work is also dedicated to a god, but in this case it is Śiva, rather than Kṛṣṇa, who is depicted as the omniscient creator of the world. Andrew J. Nicholson’s Lord Śiva’s Song makes this text available in English in an accessible new translation. A work of both poetry and philosophy, the Īśvara Gītā builds on the insights (...)
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  38. Neela Bhattacharya Saxena (2012). Peopling an Unaccustomed Earth with a New Generation: Jhumpa Lahiri’s Supreme Fictional Journey Into Human Conditions. ARGUMENT 2 (1):129-150.
    Using a theoretical framework derived from my ongoing engagement with what I have called a ‘Gynocentric matrix’ of Indic sensibility, along with James Hillman’s polytheistic psychology and Wallace Stevens’ notion of a Supreme Fiction, this paper offers a reading of Jhumpa Lahiri’s (b. 1967) short stories beyond postcolonial criticism. Stemming from a depth consciousness where life, living and death, joy, indifference and sorrow, generation, de/re-generation, and transformation are intricately intertwined, Lahiri’s fictional multiverse, opposed to universe, is peopled by a new (...)
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  39. Colette Sciberras (2010). Buddhist Philosophy and the Ideals of Environmentalism. Dissertation, Durham University
    I examine the consistency between contemporary environmentalist ideals and Buddhist philosophy, focusing, first, on the problem of value in nature. I argue that the teachings found in the Pāli canon cannot easily be reconciled with a belief in the intrinsic value of life, whether human or otherwise. This is because all existence is regarded as inherently unsatisfactory, and all beings are seen as impermanent and insubstantial, while the ultimate spiritual goal is often viewed, in early Buddhism, as involving a deep (...)
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  40. Sven Sellmer (2011). The Neophenomenological Theory of Subjectivity as a Tool for Comparative Studies. ARGUMENT 1 (1):9-22.
    The conception of subjectivity developed by the German philosopher Hermann Schmitz (1927-) is especially suitable for cross-cultural investigations because its foundations lie in human experiences that are basic and universal. The paper has two aims. Firstly, to give an outline of Schmitz’s theory. Secondly, to show its usefulness (and its limits) by interpreting some Greek and Indian philosophers which, at the same time, represent certain main approaches to the problem of subjectivity.
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  41. Jan Westerhoff (2012). Self, No Self? Perspectives From Analytical, Phenomenological, and Indian Traditions. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):812-815.
    Amongst its many other merits this collection of essays demonstrates the growing maturity of the study of the Indian philosophical tradition. Much of the good scholarship done on non-Western, and in particular on Indian philosophy over the last decades has attempted to show that these texts hailing from east of Suez contain interesting and sophisticated discussions in their own right, discussions that have to be understood against the Ancient Indian intellectual and cultural context rather than evaluated by how closely they (...)
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  42. Zhihua Yao (2005, 2009). The Buddhist Theory of Self-Cognition. Routledge.
    This highly original work explores the concept of self-awareness or self-consciousness in Buddhist thought. Its central thesis is that the Buddhist theory of self-cognition originated in a soteriological discussion of omniscience among the Mahasamghikas, and then evolved into a topic of epistemological inquiry among the Yogacarins. To illustrate this central theme, this book explores a large body of primary sources in Chinese, Pali, Sanskrit and Tibetan, most of which are presented to an English readership for the first time. It makes (...)
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