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  1. N. P. Anikeev (1969). Modern Ideological Struggle for the Ancient Philosophical Heritage of India. Manish Granthalaya.
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  2. Pratima Asthana (1992). The Indian View of History. M.G. Publishers.
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  3. Christopher R. Austin (2009). Janamejaya's Last Question. Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (6):597-625.
    This article examines closely an important passage at the conclusion of the Mahābhārata wherein the final state of the epic heroes after death is defined. The Critical Edition’s phrasing of what precisely became of the characters once they arrived in heaven is unclear, and manuscript variants offer two apparently contradictory readings. In this article I present evidence in support of one of these readings, and respond to the Mahābhārata ’s seventeenth century commentator Nīlakaṇṭha Caturdhara, who champions the other. Underlying and (...)
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  4. Monette Bebow-Reinhard (2014). Following Orders: Deliberate Defeat at the Little Bighorn. SOCRATES 1 (March 2014):50-75.
    The battle of Little Bighorn in 1876 marked the beginning of the end of conflict between the U.S. and its military against the various Native American tribes west of the Mississippi River. Historians have given us various ideas of why Lieutenant Colonel Custer met with defeat. But none have noted, in connection with the November 3rd “secret meeting” between Grant and his generals, a movement of troops away from the Black Hills even before decisions were supposedly made to no longer (...)
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  5. Gandhi (2009). Hind Swaraj and Other Writings. Cambridge University Press.
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  6. Stuart Gray & Thomas M. Hughes (2015). Gandhi’s Devotional Political Thought. Philosophy East and West 65 (2):375-400.
    The political thought of Mohandas K. Gandhi has been increasingly used as a paradigmatic example of hybrid political thought that developed out of a cross-cultural dialogue of eastern and western influences. With a novel unpacking of this hybridity, this article focuses on the conceptual influences that Gandhi explicitly stressed in his autobiography and other writings, particularly the works of Leo Tolstoy and the Bhagavad Gītā. This new tracing of influence in the development of Gandhi’s thought alters the substantive thrust of (...)
  7. Mushirul Hasan (2010). In Search of Integration and Identity: Indian Muslims Since Independence. In Aakash Singh & Silika Mohapatra (eds.), Indian Political Thought: A Reader. Routledge
  8. Raghavan Narasimhan Iyer (2000/2004). The Moral and Political Thought of Mahatma Gandhi. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, first published by OUP USA in 1973, Professor Iyer elucidates the central concepts in the moral and political thought of Mahatma Gandhi, bringing out the subtlety, potency, and universal importance of his concepts of truth and non-violence, freedom and obligation, and his view of the relation between means and ends in politics.
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  9. Sudipta Kaviraj (2012). On the Historicity of "the Political": Rajaniti and Politics in Modern Indian Thought. In Michael Freeden & Andrew Vincent (eds.), Comparative Political Thought: Theorizing Practices. Routledge 24.
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  10. Sudipta Kaviraj (2010). Outline of a Revisionist Theory of Modernity. In Aakash Singh & Silika Mohapatra (eds.), Indian Political Thought: A Reader. Routledge
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  11. Amod Lele (2013). The Compassionate Gift of Vice: Śāntideva on Gifts, Altruism, and Poverty. Journal of Buddhist Ethics 20:702-734.
    The Mahāyāna Buddhist thinker Śāntideva tells his audience to give out alcohol, weapons and sex for reasons of Buddhist compassion, though he repeatedly warns of the dangers of all these three. The article shows how Śāntideva resolves this issue: these gifts, and gifts in general, attract their recipients to the virtuous giver, in a way that helps the recipients to become more virtuous in the long run. As a consequence, Śāntideva does recommend the alleviation of poverty, but assigns it a (...)
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  12. Amod Lele (2007). Ethical Revaluation in the Thought of Śāntideva. Dissertation, Harvard University
    This dissertation examines the idea of _ethical revaluation_ — taking things we normally see as good for our flourishing and seeing them as neutral or bad, and vice versa — in the Mahāyāna Buddhist thinker Śāntideva. It shows how Śāntideva’s thought on the matter is more coherent than it might otherwise appear, first by examining the consistency of Śāntideva’s own claims and then by applying them to contemporary ethical thought. In so doing, it makes four significant contributions. Śāntideva claims that (...)
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  13. Domenic Marbaniang (2009). Secularism in India: Historical Outline. Google Books.
    Secularism in India SECULARISM IN PRE-COLONIAL PERIOD Secularism in India is not something totally new. Its roots can be found in a history that traces back ...
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  14. Basil Mitchell (2003). An Engagement with Plato's Republic: A Companion to the Republic. Ashgate.
  15. Debra Nails & Soula Proxenos (2007). Plato's Housing Policy. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 10:73-78.
    Plato put housing second only to a secure food supply in the order of business of an emerging polis [Republic 2.369d); we argue, without quibbling over rank, that adequate housing ought to have fundamental priority, with health and education, in civil societies' planning, budgets, and legislative agendas. Somethingmade explicit in the Platonic Laws, and often reiterated by today's poor — but as often forgotten by bureaucrats— is that human wellbeing, eudaimonia, is impossible for the homeless. That is, adequate housing is (...)
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  16. Bhikhu Parekh (2010). The Poverty of Indian Political Theory. In Aakash Singh & Silika Mohapatra (eds.), History of Political Thought. Routledge 535-560.
    In this paper I intend to concentrate on post-independence India, and to explore why a free and lively society with a rich tradition of philosophical inquiry has not thrown up much original political theory. The paper falls into three parts. In the first part I outline some of the fascinating problems thrown up by post-independence India, and in the second I show that they remain poorly theorized. In the final part I explore some of the likely explanations of this neglect. (...)
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  17. Shri Krishna Saksena (1970). Essays on Indian Philosophy. Honolulu,University of Hawaii Press.
    The story of Indian philosophy.--Basic tenets of Indian philosophy.--Testimony in Indian philosophy.--Hinduism.--Hinduism and Hindu philosophy.--The Jain religion.--Some riddles in the behavior of Gods and sages in the epics and the Purānas.--Autobiography of a yogi.--Jainism.--Svapramanatva and Svapraksatva: an inconsistency in Kumārila's philosophy.--The nature of Buddhi according to Sānkhya-Yoga.--The individual in social thought and practice in India.--Professor Zaehner and the comparison of religions.--A comparison between the Eastern and Western portraits of man in our time.
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  18. Desh Raj Sirswal (2014). Proceedings of the Second Online Session of SPPIS HaryanaEdit. Dissertation, CPPIS
    Second Online Session -/- on the theme -/- Development of Philosophy in India -/- 24th June, 2014 -/- positive -/- Table of Content -/- Preface to the Second Session -/- Spirituality Some Philosophical trends : PROF. D.N.TIWARI -/- ROLE OF YOGA AND NATUROPATHY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN IDEAL LIFE STYLE: PROF. SOHAN RAJ TATER -/- THE DEVELOPMENT OF EARLY MUSLIM PHILOSOPHY: DR MERINA ISLAM -/- THE RELEVANCE OF PHILOSOPHY IN THE 21ST CENTURY: DR. K.VICTOR BABU -/- Public Service Values (...)
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  19. Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2014). The Philosophy of Dalit Liberation (E-Book). KDP.
    The Philosophy of Dalit Liberation [Kindle Edition] Desh Raj Sirswal (Editor) Kindle Price (US$): $2.88 You Save: $0.10 (3%) Kindle Price (INR): Rs. 183.00 includes free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet .
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  20. Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2013). Contemporary Indian Philosophy. CPPIS Pehowa.
    Contemporary Indian Philosophy is related to contemporary Indian thinkers and contains the proceedings of First Session of Society for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (SPPIS) Haryana. It is neither easy nor impossible to translate into action all noble goals set forth by the eminent thinkers and scholars, but we might try to discuss and propagate their ideas. In this session all papers submitted electronically and selected abstracts have been published on a website especially develop for this session. In this volume (...)
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  21. Desh Raj Sirswal (2013). Jyotiba Phule : A Modern Indian Philosopher. Darshan: International Refereed Quarterly Research Journal for Philosophy and Yoga 1 (3-4):28-36.
    JOTIRAO GOVINDRAO PHULE occupies a unique position among the social reformers of Maharashtra in the nineteenth century. While other reformers concentrated more on reforming the social institutions of family and marriage with special emphasis on the status and right of women, Jotirao Phule revolted against the unjust caste system under which millions of people had suffered for centuries and developed a critique of Indian social order and Hinduism. During this period, number of social and political thinkers started movement against such (...)
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  22. Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2012). Reconsidering Classical Indian Thoughts. Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS).
    Reconsidering Classical Indian Thoughts neither claims, nor attempts to be a definitive study of all the characteristics as concept(s) of classical Indian thoughts. It is a modest attempt of the editor to familiarise the common, but philosophy reader with the fundamental conceptions of ancient Indian culture. I hope, by studying this book the reader will understand the relevance of Indian classical thoughts. -/- Here we have collected 17 papers both in English and Hindi languages written on Indian epistemology, metaphysics, logic, (...)
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  23. David Slakter (2011). On Mātsyanyāya : The State of Nature in Indian Thought. Asian Philosophy 21 (1):23-34.
    This paper calls attention to m?tsyany?ya, or state of nature theories, in classical Indian thought, and their significance. The focus is on those discussions of m?tsyany?ya found in the law books, political treatises and the Mah?bh?rata epic. The significance and relevance of m?tsyany?ya theories are shown through a comparison with early modern state of nature theories and an elaboration on the possible place of rights and dharma in m?tsyany?ya and the consequences of this for classical Indian political theory.
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