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  1. Katy Gray Brown (2003). Book Review: Shari M. Huhndorf. Going Native: Indians in the American Cultural Imagination. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2001. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):218-221.
  2. Sandy Grande (2003). Whitestream Feminism and the Colonialist Project: A Review of Contemporary Feminist Pedagogy and Praxis. [REVIEW] Educational Theory 53 (3):329-346.
  3. M. A. Jaimes* Guerrero (2003). ?Patriarchal Colonialism? And Indigenism: Implications for Native Feminist Spirituality and Native Womanism. Hypatia 18 (2):58-69.
  4. Donna Hightower-Langston (2003). American Indian Women's Activism in the 1960s and 1970s. Hypatia 18 (2):114-132.
    : This article will focus on the role of women in three red power events: the occupation of Alcatraz Island, the Fish-in movement, and the occupation at Wounded Knee. Men held most public roles at Alcatraz and Wounded Knee, even though women were the numerical majority at Wounded Knee. Female elders played a significant role at Wounded Knee, where the occupation was originally their idea. In contrast to these two occupations, the public leaders of the Fish-in movement were women—not an (...)
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  5. M. Annette Jaimes (2003). "Patriarchal Colonialism" and Indigenism: Implications for Native Feminist Spirituality and Native Womanism. Hypatia 18 (2):58-69.
    : This essay begins with a Native American women's perspective on Early Feminism which came about as a result of Euroamerican patriarchy in U. S. society. It is followed by the myth of "tribalism," regarding the language and laws of U. S. colonialism imposed upon Native American peoples and their respective cultures. This colonialism is well documented in Federal Indian law and public policy by the U.S. government, which includes the state as well as federal level. The paper proceeds to (...)
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  6. Donna Hightower Langston (2003). American Indian Women's Activism in the 1960s and 1970s. Hypatia 18 (2):114 - 132.
    This article will focus on the role of women in three red power events: the occupation of Alcatraz Island, the Fish-in movement, and the occupation at Wounded Knee. Men held most public roles at Alcatraz and Wounded Knee, even though women were the numerical majority at Wounded Knee. Female elders played a significant role at Wounded Knee, where the occupation was originally their idea. In contrast to these two occupations, the public leaders of the Fish-in movement were women-not an untraditional (...)
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  7. Lorraine Mayer (2007). A Return to Reciprocity. Hypatia 22 (3):22-42.
    : Feminist affiliation has long been suspect among Native American women whose memories survive the dishonor of colonialism. The idea of common struggles is simultaneously repugnant and alluring. Sadly, this has led to much confusion and rejection between Aboriginal women. I suggest "a return to reciprocity" to understand and come to terms with feminist rejection or affiliation. If we cannot come together, the fracturing that began with European ideology will continue to fragment and destroy the fabric of Native cultures.
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  8. Shane Phelan (1996). Coyote Politics: Trickster Tales and Feminist Futures. Hypatia 11 (3):130 - 149.
    This essay is a first attempt at thinking through the ways in which Native American Coyote stories can illuminate options for lesbian and feminist politics. I follow the metaphors of trickery and shape-shifting common to the stories and recommend the laughter they evoke as we engage in feminist politics and philosophy.
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  9. Wanda S. Pillow (2007). Searching for Sacajawea: Whitened Reproductions and Endarkened Representations. Hypatia 22 (2):1-19.
    : Pillow's aim is to demonstrate how representations of Sacajawea have shifted in writings about the Lewis and Clark expedition in ways that support manifest destiny and white colonial projects. This essay begins with a general account of Sacajawea. The next section uses two novels (one hundred years apart) to make the case that shifts in the representation of this important historical figure serve similar purposes. There is some attention to white suffragist representations, but the central contrast is between manifest (...)
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  10. Valerie R. Renegar & Stacey K. Sowards (2003). Liberal Irony, Rhetoric, and Feminist Thought: A Unifying Third Wave Feminist Theory. Philosophy and Rhetoric 36 (4):330-352.
  11. Andrea Smith (2003). Not an Indian Tradition: The Sexual Colonization of Native Peoples. Hypatia 18 (2):70-85.
    : This paper analyzes the connections between sexual violence and colonialism in the lives and histories of Native peoples in the United States. This paper argues that sexual violence does not simply just occur within the process of colonialism, but that colonialism is itself structured by the logic of sexual violence. Furthermore, this logic of sexual violence continues to structure U. S. policies toward Native peoples today. Consequently, anti-sexual violence and anti-colonial struggles cannot be separated.
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  12. Anne Waters (2003). Introduction: Special Issue on "Native American Women, Feminism, and Indigenism". Hypatia 18 (2).
  13. Anne Waters (2003). Transubstantiation and Lav'nder Nights. Hypatia 18 (2):101-102.
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