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Subcategories:History/traditions: Induction
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  1. A. R. A. (1957). The Logical Problem of Induction. Review of Metaphysics 11 (2):354-354.
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  2. L. A. (1971). The Implications of Induction. Review of Metaphysics 25 (2):350-351.
  3. Peter Achinstein (2010). The War on Induction: Whewell Takes On Newton and Mill (Norton Takes On Everyone). Philosophy of Science 77 (5):728-739.
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  4. Robert Ackermann (1961). Inductive Simplicity. Philosophy of Science 28 (2):152-161.
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  5. Robert J. Ackermann (1966). Projecting Unprojectibles. Philosophy of Science 33 (1/2):70-75.
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  6. Robert John Ackermann (1981). Studies in Inductive Probability and Rational Expectation. Philosophical Books 22 (1):44-46.
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  7. Zofia Adamowicz (1987). Open Induction and the True Theory of Rationals. Journal of Symbolic Logic 52 (3):793-801.
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  8. Jonathan E. Adler (1977). Book Review:Local Induction Radu J. Bogdan. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 44 (1):173-.
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  9. Joseph Agassi (1990). Induction and Stochastic Independence. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (1):141-142.
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  10. Joseph Agassi (1959). Corroboration Versus Induction. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 9 (36):311-317.
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  11. Robert Almeder (2007). Pragmatism and Philosophy of Science: A Critical Survey. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 21 (2):171 – 195.
    After delineating the distinguishing features of pragmatism, and noting the resources that pragmatists have available to respond effectively as pragmatists to the two major objections to pragmatism, I examine and critically evaluate the various proposals that pragmatists have offered as a solution to the problem of induction, followed by a discussion of the pragmatic positions on the status of theoretical entities. Thereafter I discuss the pragmatic posture toward the nature of explanation in science. I conclude that pragmatism has (a) a (...)
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  12. Logique A. Analyse (2001). On Classical Adaptive Logics of Induction* Diderik Batens and Lieven Haesaert. Logique Et Analyse 44:255.
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  13. Gian Aldo Antonelli & Cristina Bicchieri, Forward Induction.
    Gian Aldo Antonelli and Cristina Bicchieri. Forward Induction.
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  14. Massimiliano Badino (2004). An Application of Information Theory to the Problem of the Scientific Experiment. Synthese 140 (3):355 - 389.
    There are two basic approaches to the problem of induction:the empirical one, which deems that the possibility of induction depends on how theworld was made (and how it works) and the logical one, which considers the formation(and function) of language. The first is closer to being useful for induction, whilethe second is more rigorous and clearer. The purpose of this paper is to create an empiricalapproach to induction that contains the same formal exactitude as the logical approach.This requires: (a) that (...)
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  15. Bernhard Banaschewski (1960). On Principles of Inductive Definition. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 6 (15‐22):248-257.
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  16. E. M. Barth (1992). From an Empirical Point of View: The Empirical Turn in Logic. Communication & Cognition.
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  17. Diderik Batens (1975). Studies in the Logic of Induction and in the Logic of Explanation: Containing a New Theory of Meaning Relations. De Tempel.
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  18. Alexander Bird, (For Routledge Companion to Epistemology).
    In this article I take a loose, functional approach to defining induction: Inductive forms of reasoning include those prima facie reasonable inference patterns that one finds in science and elsewhere that are not clearly deductive. Inductive inference is often taken to be reasoning from the observed to the unobserved. But that is incorrect, since the premises of inductive inferences may themselves be the results of prior inductions. A broader conception of inductive inference regards any ampliative inference as inductive, where an (...)
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  19. Alexander Bird (2010). Eliminative Abduction: Examples From Medicine. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (4):345-352.
    Peter Lipton argues that inference to the best explanation involves the selection of a hypothesis on the basis of its loveliness. I argue that in optimal cases, a form of eliminative induction takes place, which I call ‘Holmesian inference’. I illustrate Holmesian inference by reference to examples from the history of medicine.
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  20. Thomas A. Blackson (2006). Induction and Experience In Metaphysics 1.1. Review of Metaphysics 59 (3):541 - 552.
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  21. George Boolos (1984). The Justification of Mathematical Induction. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:469 - 475.
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  22. Robert Brandom (1988). Inference, Expression, and Induction. Philosophical Studies 54 (2):257 - 285.
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  23. Ingo Brigandt (2010). Scientific Reasoning Is Material Inference: Combining Confirmation, Discovery, and Explanation. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (1):31-43.
    Whereas an inference (deductive as well as inductive) is usually viewed as being valid in virtue of its argument form, the present paper argues that scientific reasoning is material inference, i.e., justified in virtue of its content. A material inference is licensed by the empirical content embodied in the concepts contained in the premises and conclusion. Understanding scientific reasoning as material inference has the advantage of combining different aspects of scientific reasoning, such as confirmation, discovery, and explanation. This approach explains (...)
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  24. C. D. Broad (1944). Hr. Von Wright on the Logic of Induction (I.). Mind 53 (209):1-24.
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  25. C. D. Broad (1944). Hr. Von Wright on the Logic of Induction (II.). Mind 53 (210):97-119.
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  26. C. D. Broad (1944). Hr. Von Wright on the Logic of Induction (III.). Mind 53 (211):193-214.
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  27. May Brodbeck (1952). An Analytic Principle of Induction? Journal of Philosophy 49 (24):747-750.
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  28. Arthur W. Burks (1955). On the Presuppositions of Induction. Review of Metaphysics 8 (4):574 - 611.
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  29. Arthur W. Burks (1951). Reichenbach's Theory of Probability and Induction. Review of Metaphysics 4 (3):377 - 393.
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  30. Sarah Buss (1999). Practical Induction. Philosophical Review 108 (4):571-575.
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  31. Lucas P. Butler & Ellen M. Markman (2010). Pedagogical Cues Influence Children's Inductive Inference and Exploratory Play. In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
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  32. Scott Campbell (2001). Review: David Stove - Against the Idols of the Age. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 54 (4):943-945.
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  33. Rudolf Carnap (1963). My Basic Conceptions of Probability and Induction, PA Schilpp Ed. In Paul Arthur Schilpp (ed.), The Philosophy of Rudolf Carnap. La Salle, Ill.,Open Court.
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  34. Rudolf Carnap (1946). Remarks on Induction and Truth. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 6 (4):590-602.
  35. Peter Caws (1962). The Paradox of Induction and the Inductive Wager. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (4):512-520.
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  36. Y. L. Chin (1940). The Principle of Induction and a Priori. Journal of Philosophy 37 (7):178-187.
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  37. Samir Chopra & Eric Martin (2002). Generalized Logical Consequence: Making Room for Induction in the Logic of Science. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 31 (3):245-280.
    We present a framework that provides a logic for science by generalizing the notion of logical (Tarskian) consequence. This framework will introduce hierarchies of logical consequences, the first level of each of which is identified with deduction. We argue for identification of the second level of the hierarchies with inductive inference. The notion of induction presented here has some resonance with Popper's notion of scientific discovery by refutation. Our framework rests on the assumption of a restricted class of structures in (...)
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  38. Ralph W. Clark (1983). Induction Justified (But Just Barely). Philosophy 58 (226):481 - 488.
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  39. F. John Clendinnen (1977). Inference, Practice and Theory. Synthese 34 (1):89 - 132.
    Reichenbach held that all scientific inference reduces, via probability calculus, to induction, and he held that induction can be justified. He sees scientific knowledge in a practical context and insists that any rational assessment of actions requires a justification of induction. Gaps remain in his justifying argument; for we can not hope to prove that induction will succeed if success is possible. However, there are good prospects for completing a justification of essentially the kind he sought by showing that while (...)
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  40. James Van Cleve (1984). Reliability, Justification, and the Problem of Induction. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 9 (1):555-567.
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  41. Aaron D. Cobb (2012). Inductivism in Practice: Experiment in John Herschel's Philosophy of Science. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (1):21-54.
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  42. L. Jonathan Cohen (1989). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Induction and Probability. Oxford University Press.
    Two new philosophical problems surrounding the gradation of certainty began to emerge in the 17th century and are still very much alive today. One is concerned with the evaluation of inductive reasoning, whether in science, jurisprudence, or elsewhere; the other with the interpretation of the mathematical calculus of change. This book, aimed at non-specialists, investigates both problems and the extent to which they are connected. Cohen demonstrates the diversity of logical structures that are available for judgements of probability, and explores (...)
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  43. L. Jonathan Cohen (1970). The Implications of Induction. London,Methuen.
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  44. Yaël Cohen (1979). A New View of Grue. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 10 (2):244-252.
    Professor Goodman first presented his "new riddle of induction" in 1946 but it was mainly the more elaborated version published in his Fact, Fiction and Forecast in 1955 that has captured the attention of philosophers. Since then, numerous attempts to solve his "paradox of grue" appeared in press; none of them, however, proved to be wholly satisfactory. In this paper I want to present a solution to this 30-years old puzzle. In the first section I shall try to show that (...)
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  45. John Collier, Formalism, Foundations, and Forecast.
    Goodman’s account of the ‘grue’ paradox stands at a crossroads in the history of twentieth century epistemology. Published in 1954, Fact, Fiction, and Forecast is a reaction to the logical empiricist views that held sway in the first half of the last century and anticipates many of the conventionalist and/or relativist moves popular throughout the second half. Through his evaluation of Hume’s problem of induction, as well as his own novel reformulation of it, Goodman comes to reject a number of (...)
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  46. George Couvalis (2004). Is Induction Epistemologically Prior to Deduction? Ratio 17 (1):28–44.
    Most philosophers hold that the use of our deductive powers confers an especially strong warrant on some of our mathematical and logical beliefs. By contrast, many of the same philosophers hold that it is a matter of serious debate whether any inductive inferences are cogent. That is, they hold that we might well have no warrant for inductively licensed beliefs, such as generalizations. I argue that we cannot know that we know logical and mathemati- cal truths unless we use induction. (...)
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  47. C. Crow (1963). Some Remarks on Induction. Synthese 15 (1):379 - 388.
    A feature of induction is the idea that our reasoning about the unknown should take into consideration the known. In this paper a modified version of this truistic principle is supported. It is argued that whether or not the unknown is like the known depends on the nature of the case in question. Discussion of infinite series, Evidence sentences, Total evidence, The raven paradox, Counter-Induction and suspension of knowledge illustrate this thesis.
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  48. David Danks, Equilibria of the Rescorla-Wagner Model.
    The Rescorla–Wagner model has been a leading theory of animal causal induction for nearly 30 years, and human causal induction for the past 15 years. Recent theories (especially Psychol. Rev. 104 (1997) 367) have provided alternative explanations of how people draw causal conclusions from covariational data. However, theoretical attempts to compare the Rescorla–Wagner model with more recent models have been hampered by the fact that the Rescorla–Wagner model is an algorithmic theory, while the more recent theories are all computational. This (...)
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  49. Francis W. Dauer (2000). Humean Naturalism and the Problem of Induction. Ratio 13 (2):123–137.
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  50. Yuval Dolev (2004). Why Induction is No Cure for Baldness. Philosophical Investigations 27 (4):328–344.
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