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  1. José Luis Bermúdez (1996). The Moral Significance of Birth. Ethics 106 (2):378-403.
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  2. A. G. M. Campbell (1979). Infanticide and the Value of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (3):150-150.
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  3. Robert F. Card (2000). Infanticide and the Liberal View on Abortion. Bioethics 14 (4):340–351.
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  4. Alan Carter (1997). Infanticide and the Right to Life. Ratio 10 (1):1–9.
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  5. Andrew Chignell (2001). Infant Suffering Revisited. Religious Studies 37 (4):475-484.
    I respond to two sets of objections to my characterization of infant suffering and the problem that it presents to traditional theism. My main theses were that infant suffering to death is not ‘horrendous’ in the technical sense defined, but that a good God still needs to "balance off" rather than "defeat" such suffering. David Basinger, on the other hand, claims that some infant suffering should be considered horrendous, while Nathan Nobis suggests that such suffering must be defeated rather than (...)
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  6. Andrew Chignell (1998). The Problem of Infant Suffering. Religious Studies 34 (2):205-217.
    The problem of infant suffering and death is often regarded as one of the more difficult versions of the problem of evil (see Ivan Karamazov), especially when one considers how God can be thought good to infant victims by the infant victims. In the first section of this paper, I examine two recent theodicies that aim to solve this problem but (I argue) fail. In the second section, I suggest that the only viable approach to the problem rejects the idea (...)
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  7. A. Davis (1988). Infanticide for the Handicapped Newborn--A Secular Rejection. Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (4):223-223.
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  8. Philip E. Devine (1984). Abortion and Infanticide By Michael Tooley Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983, 441 Pp., £20.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 59 (230):545-.
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  9. Philip E. Devine (1983). Abortion, Contraception, Infanticide. Philosophy 58 (226):513 - 520.
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  10. Catherine Driscoll (2005). Killing Babies: Hrdy on the Evolution of Infanticide. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):271-289.
    Sarah Hrdy argues that women (1) possess a reproductive behavioral strategy including infanticide, (2) that this strategy is an adaptation and (3) arose as a response to stresses mothers faced with the agrarian revolution. I argue that while psychopathological and cultural evolutionary accounts for Hrdy's data fail, her suggested psychological architecture for the strategy suggests that the behavior she describes is really only the consequence of the operation of practical reasoning mechanism(s) – and consequently there is no reproductive strategy including (...)
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  11. Michael L. Gross (2002). Abortion and Neonaticide: Ethics, Practice and Policy in Four Nations. Bioethics 16 (3):202–230.
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  12. J. Harris (1985). Abortion and Infanticide. Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (4):212-212.
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  13. Nicole Hassoun & Uriah Kriegel (2008). Consciousness and the Moral Permissibility of Infanticide. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):45–55.
    In this paper, we present a conditional argument for the moral permissibility of some kinds of infanticide. The argument is based on a certain view of consciousness and the claim that there is an intimate connection between consciousness and infanticide. In bare outline, the argument is this: it is impermissible to intentionally kill a creature only if the creature is conscious; it is reasonable to believe that there is some time at which human infants are conscious; therefore, it is reasonable (...)
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  14. E. W. Keyserlingk (1986). Against Infanticide. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (3-4):154-157.
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  15. G. K. Kimsma (1993). Infanticide and the Vulnerable Newborn: The Dutch Debate. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (03):259-.
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  16. Alexander A. Kon (2007). Neonatal Euthanasia is Unsupportable: The Groningen Protocol Should Be Abandoned. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (5):453-463.
    The growing support for voluntary active euthanasia (VAE) is evident in the recently approved Dutch Law on Termination of Life on Request. Indeed, the debate over legalized VAE has increased in European countries, the United States, and many other nations over the last several years. The proponents of VAE argue that when a patient judges that the burdens of living outweigh the benefits, euthanasia can be justified. If some adults suffer to such an extent that VAE is justified, then one (...)
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  17. Helga Kuhse (1992). Quality of Life and the Death of "Baby M". A Report From Australia. Bioethics 6 (3):233–250.
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  18. Paul Langham (1979). Between Abortion and Infanticide. Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (4):465-471.
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  19. S. Matthew Liao (2007). Time-Relative Interests and Abortion. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (2):242-256.
    The concept of a time-relative interest is introduced by Jeff McMahan to solve certain puzzles about the badness of death. Some people (e.g. McMahan and David DeGrazia) believe that this concept can also be used to show that abortion is permissible. In this paper, I first argue that if the Time-Relative Interest Account permits abortion, then it would also permit infanticide.
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  20. T. A. Long (1988). Infanticide for Handicapped Infants: Sometimes It's a Metaphysical Dispute. Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (2):79-81.
    Since 1973 the practice of infanticide for some severely handicapped newborns has been receiving more open discussion and defence in the literature on medical ethics. A recent and important argument for the permissibility of infanticide relies crucially on a particular concept of personhood that excludes the theological. This paper attempts to show that the dispute between the proponents of infanticide and their religious opponents cannot be resolved because one side's perspective on the infant is shaped by a metaphysics that is (...)
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  21. Mathew Lu (2013). Aristotle on Abortion and Infanticide. International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (1):47-62.
    Some recent commentators have thought that, if updated with the findings of modern embryology, Aristotle’s views on abortion would yield a pro-life conclusion. On the basis of a careful reading of the relevant passage from Politics VII, I argue that the matter is more complicated than simply replacing his defective empirical embryological claims with our more accurate ones. Since Aristotle’s view on abortion was shaped not only by a defective embryology but also by an acceptance of the classical Greek practice (...)
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  22. David J. Malkiel (1993). Infanticide in Passover Iconography. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 56:85-99.
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  23. Jeff McMahan (2007). Infanticide. Utilitas 19 (2):131-159.
    It is sometimes suggested that if a moral theory implies that infanticide can sometimes be permissible, that is sufficient to discredit the theory. I argue in this article that the common-sense belief that infanticide is wrong, and perhaps even worse than the killing of an adult, is challenged not so much by theoretical considerations as by common-sense beliefs about abortion, the killing of non-human animals, and so on. Because there are no intrinsic differences between premature infants and viable fetuses, it (...)
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  24. Phillip Montague (1989). Infant Rights and the Morality of Infanticide. Noûs 23 (1):63-81.
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  25. John J. Paris (2011). Standards, Norms, and Guidelines for Permissible Withdrawal of Life Support From Seriously Compromised Newborns. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):33 - 34.
    (2011). Standards, Norms, and Guidelines for Permissible Withdrawal of Life Support From Seriously Compromised Newborns. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 33-34.
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  26. John J. Paris & Anne B. Fletcher (1983). Infant Doe Regulations and the Absolute Requirement to Use Nourishment and Fluids for the Dying Infant. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 11 (5):210-213.
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  27. E. F. Paul & J. Paul (1979). Self-Ownership, Abortion and Infanticide. Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (3):133-138.
    Doctors have been placed in an anomalous position by abortion laws which sanction the termination of a fetus while in a woman's womb, yet call it murder when a physician attempts to end the life of a fetus which has somehow survived such a procedure. This predicament, the doctors' dilemma, can be resolved by adopting a strategy which posits the right to ownership of one's own body for human beings. Such an approach will generate a consistent policy prescription, one that (...)
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  28. Jeffrey Reiman (1998). Abortion, Infanticide, and the Changing Grounds of the Wrongness of Killing: Reply to Don Marquis's "Reiman on Abortion". Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (2):168-174.
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  29. Jeffrey Reiman (1996). Abortion, Infanticide, and the Asymmetric Value of Human Life. Journal of Social Philosophy 27 (3):181-200.
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  30. Eric Schliesser, From Adam Smith to Darwin; Some Neglected Evidence.
    In this paper I call attention to Adam Smith’s “Considerations Concerning the First Formation of Languages” in order to facilitate understanding Adam Smith from a Darwinian perspective. By ‘Darwinian’ I mean a position that explains differential selection over time through natural mechanisms. First, I argue that right near the start of Wealth of Nations Smith signals that human nature has probably evolved over a very long amount of time. Second, I connect this evidence with an infamous passage on infanticide in (...)
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  31. Eric S. Schliesser, From Adam Smith to Darwin.
    In this paper I call attention to Adam Smith’s 'Considerations Concerning the First Formation of Languages' in order to facilitate understanding Adam Smith from a Darwinian perspective. By ‘Darwinian’ I mean a position that explains differential selection over time through natural mechanisms. First, I argue that right near the start of Wealth of Nations Smith signals that human nature has probably evolved over a very long amount of time. Second, I connect this evidence with an infamous passage on infanticide in (...)
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  32. Renuka M. Sharma (2007). The Ethics of Birth and Death: Gender Infanticide in India. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (3):181-192.
    This paper discusses the persistent devaluation of the girl child in India and the link between the entrenched perception of female valuelessness and the actual practice of infanticide of girl babies or foetuses. It seeks to place female infanticide, or ‘gendercide,’ within the context of Western-derived conceptions of ethics, justice and rights. To date, current ethical theories and internationally purveyed moral frameworks, as well as legal and political declarations, have fallen short of an adequate moral appraisal of infanticide. This paper (...)
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  33. Daniel B. Sinclair (1992). The Interaction Between Law and Morality in Jewish Law in the Areas of Feticide and Killing a Terminally Ill Individual. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (2):76-84.
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  34. Peter Singer (1979). Killing Humans and Killing Animals. Inquiry 22 (1-4):145 – 156.
    It is one thing to say that the suffering of non-human animals ought to be considered equally with the like suffering of humans; quite another to decide how the wrongness of killing non-human animals compares with the wrongness of killing human beings. It is argued that while species makes no difference to the wrongness of killing, the possession of certain capacities, in particular the capacity to see oneself as a distinct entity with a future, does. It is claimed, however, that (...)
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  35. A. Sloane (1999). Singer, Preference Utilitarianism and Infanticide. Studies in Christian Ethics 12 (2):47-73.
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  36. Michael Tooley (1972). Abortion and Infanticide. Philosophy and Public Affairs 2 (1):37-65.
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  37. Lawrence Torcello (2009). A Precautionary Tale: Separating the Infant From the Fetus. Res Publica 15 (1):17-31.
    This article confronts growing conservative opposition to abortion based on the claim that abortion is morally equivalent to infanticide. By examining the relationship between moral skepticism and precautionary ethics the article promotes a completely permissive position on abortion from conception to birth while consistently rejecting the possibility that such a position entails permissive implications for infanticide. The article introduces and traces the implicit relationship between moral skepticism, the precautionary principle and political liberalism.
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  38. Robert D. Truog & John C. Fletcher (1990). Brain Death and the Anencephalic Newborn. Bioethics 4 (3):199–215.
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  39. Mark Tushnet & Louis Michael Seidman (1986). A Comment on Tooley's Abortion and Infanticide. Ethics 96 (2):350-355.
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  40. S. Uniacke (1997). Replaceability and Infanticide. Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (2):153-166.
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  41. Mary Anne Warren (2000). The Moral Difference Between Infanticide and Abortion: A Response to Robert Card. Bioethics 14 (4):352–359.
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  42. Dominic James Wilkinson (2011). A Life Worth Giving? The Threshold for Permissible Withdrawal of Life Support From Disabled Newborn Infants. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):20 - 32.
    When is it permissible to allow a newborn infant to die on the basis of their future quality of life? The prevailing official view is that treatment may be withdrawn only if the burdens in an infant's future life outweigh the benefits. In this paper I outline and defend an alternative view. On the Threshold View, treatment may be withdrawn from infants if their future well-being is below a threshold that is close to, but above the zero-point of well-being. I (...)
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  43. Richard M. Zaner (1989). Anencephalics as Organ Donors. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (1):61-78.
    This paper reviews objections to the proposal to allow parents of anencephalics to donate their infant's organs for transplantation and finds them unpersuasive. Instead, interpretations of ‘Baby Doe’ legislation, a ‘higher-brain’ functional conception of death, the idea of ‘viability’ in many abortion statutes, and the wishes of many patients, give strong support for the proposal for organ transplantation using anencephalics. Keywords: anencephalic, definition of death, transplantation CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
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