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  1. E. H. Alves & J. A. D. Guerzoni (1990). Extending Montague's System: A Three Valued Intensional Logic. Studia Logica 49 (1):127 - 132.
    In this note we present a three-valued intensional logic, which is an extension of both Montague's intensional logic and ukasiewicz three-valued logic. Our system is obtained by adapting Gallin's version of intensional logic (see Gallin, D., Intensional and Higher-order Modal Logic). Here we give only the necessary modifications to the latter. An acquaintance with Gallin's work is pressuposed.
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  2. C. Anthony Anderson (1998). Alonzo Church's Contributions to Philosophy and Intensional Logic. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 4 (2):129-171.
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  3. C. Anthony Anderson (1993). Zalta's Intensional Logic. Philosophical Studies 69 (2-3):221 - 229.
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  4. C. Anthony Anderson (1986). Some Difficulties Concerning Russellian Intensional Logic. Noûs 20 (1):35-43.
  5. Lennart Åqvist (1999). The Logic of Historical Necessity as Founded on Two-Dimensional Modal Tense Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 28 (4):329-369.
    We consider a version of so called T x W logic for historical necessity in the sense of R.H. Thomason (1984), which is somewhat special in three respects: (i) it is explicitly based on two-dimensional modal logic in the sense of Segerberg (1973); (ii) for reasons of applicability to interesting fields of philosophical logic, it conceives of time as being discrete and finite in the sense of having a beginning and an end; and (iii) it utilizes the technique of systematic (...)
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  6. Steven M. Duncan, Possibilities That Matter I: Material Possibility.
    This is the first of a series of four papers presenting modal logic as a branch of material, rather than merely formal, logic.
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  7. Steven M. Duncan, Possibilities That Matter II: Material Contingency and Sufficient Reason.
    This is the second of a series of papers inspired by a paper I wrote around 1989. In this paper, I consider the notion of material contingency and relate it to the traditional, metaphysically loaded Principle of Sufficient Reason.
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  8. Steven M. Duncan, Possibilities That Matter III: Materially Necessary Being.
    This is the third in a series of papers on material modality, which explores the concept of a materially necessary being and argues that such a being exists.
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  9. Steven M. Duncan, Possibilities That Matter IV: The Ground of All Possibilities.
    This is the final paper in the Possibilities that Matter series and attempts to complete the project of constructing a material interpretation of modal logic.
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  10. David Israel & John Perry (1996). Where Monsters Dwell. In Jerry Seligman & Dag Westerståhl (eds.), Logic, Language and Computation. Csli Publications, Stanford. 1--303.
    Kaplan says that monsters violate Principle 2 of his theory. Principle 2 is that indexicals, pure and demonstrative alike, are directly referential. In providing this explanation of there being no monsters, Kaplan feels his theory has an advantage over double-indexing theories like Kamp’s or Segerberg’s (or Stalnaker’s), which either embrace monsters or avoid them only by ad hoc stipulation, in the sharp conceptual distinction it draws between circumstances of evaluation and contexts of utterance. We shall argue that Kaplan’s prohibition is (...)
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  11. David Kaplan (1964). Foundations of Intensional Logic. Dissertation, UCLA
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  12. Franck Lihoreau & Manuel Rebuschi (eds.) (forthcoming). Epistemology, Context, and Formalism. Springer.
  13. Stefano Predelli (2008). Modal Monsters and Talk About Fiction. Journal of Philosophical Logic 37 (3):277-297.
    This paper argues in favor of a treatment of discourse about fiction in terms of operators on character, that is, Kaplanesque ‘monsters’. The first three sections criticize the traditional analysis of ‘according to the fiction’ as an intensional operator, and the approach to fictional discourse grounded on the notion of contextual shifts. The final sections explain how an analysis in terms of monsters yields the correct readings for a variety of examples involving modal and temporal indexicals.
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  14. W. V. Quine (1991). Two Dogmas in Retrospect. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):265 - 274.
    In retrospecting "Two Dogmas" I find myself overshooting by twenty years. I think back to college days, 61 years agao. I majored in mathematics and was doing my honors reading in mathematical logic, a subject that had not yet penetrated the Oberlin curriculum. My new love, in the platonic sense, was Whitehead and Russell's Principia Mathematica.
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  15. Krister Segerberg (1992). Getting Started: Beginnings in the Logic of Action. Studia Logica 51 (3-4):347 - 378.
    A history of the logic of action is outlined, beginning with St Anselm. Five modern authors are discussed in some detail: von Wright, Fitch, Kanger, Chellas and Pratt.
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  16. Jerry Seligman & Dag Westerståhl (eds.) (1996). Logic, Language and Computation. Csli Publications, Stanford.
  17. Graham White (2008). Causality, Modality, and Explanation. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 49 (3):313-343.
    We start with Fodor's critique of cognitive science in "The mind doesn't work that way: The scope and limits of computational psychology": he argues that much mental activity cannot be handled by the current methods of cognitive science because it is nonmonotonic and, therefore, is global in nature, is not context-free, and is thus not capable of being formalized by a Turing-like mental architecture. We look at the use of nonmonotonic logic in the artificial intelligence community, particularly with the discussion (...)
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