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  1. M. Cristina Amoretti & Nicla Vassallo (eds.) (2008). Knowledge, Language, and Interpretation: On the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. Ontos Verlag.
    Thanks to their heterogeneity, the nine essays in this volume offer a clear testimony of Donald Davidson's authority, and they undoubtedly show how much his work - even if it has raised many doubts and criticisms - has been, and still is, highly influential and significant in contemporary analytical philosophy for a wide range of subjects. Moreover, the various articles not only critically and carefully analyse Davidson's theses and arguments (in particular those concerning language and knowledge), but they also illustrate (...)
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  2. Ben Blumson, 'Metaphorically'.
    Not every metaphor can be literally paraphrased by a corresponding simile – the metaphorical meaning of ‘Juliet is the sun’, for example, is not the literal meaning of ‘Juliet is like the sun’. But every metaphor can be literally paraphrased, since if ‘metaphorically’ is prefixed to a metaphor, the result says literally what the metaphor says figuratively – the metaphorical meaning of ‘Juliet is the sun’, for example, is the literal meaning of ‘metaphorically, Juliet is the sun’.
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  3. Ben Blumson (2014). Depiction and Intention. In Resemblance and Representation. Open Book Publishers. 51-66.
  4. Robert Briscoe, Depiction, Pictorial Experience, and Vision Science.
    Pictures are 2D surfaces designed to elicit 3D-scene-representing experiences from their viewers. In this essay, I argue that philosophers have tended to underestimate the relevance of research in vision science to understanding the nature of pictorial experience or ‘seeing-in’, to use Richard Wollheim’s familiar expression. Both the deeply entrenched methodology of virtual psychophysics as well as empirical studies of pictorial space perception provide compelling support for the view that seeing-in and seeing face-to-face are experiences of the same psychological, explanatory kind. (...)
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  5. Laurie Calhoun (1994). The Intentional Fallacy. Philosophy and Literature 18 (2):337-338.
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  6. Noël Carroll (1997). The Intentional Fallacy: Defending Myself. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (3):305-309.
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  7. Johan de Smedt & Helen de Cruz (2011). A Cognitive Approach to the Earliest Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):379-389.
    This paper takes a cognitive perspective to assess the significance of some Late Palaeolithic artefacts (sculptures and engraved objects) for philosophicalconcepts of art. We examine cognitive capacities that are necessary to produceand recognize objects that are denoted as art. These include the ability toattribute and infer design (design stance), the ability to distinguish between themateriality of an object and its meaning (symbol-mindedness), and an aesthetic sensitivity to some perceptual stimuli. We investigate to what extent thesecognitive processes played a role in (...)
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  8. George Dickie & W. Kent Wilson (1995). The Intentional Fallacy: Defending Beardsley. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (3):233-250.
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  9. Carol Donnell-Kotrozo (1980). The Intentional Fallacy: An Applied Reappraisal. British Journal of Aesthetics 20 (4):356-365.
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  10. James Downey (2007). A Fallacy in the Intentional Fallacy. Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):149-152.
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  11. John Gibson (2010). Interpretation, Sincerity and "Theory&Quot;. Contemporary Aesthetics 8.
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  12. A. Huddleston (2012). The Conversation Argument for Actual Intentionalism. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (3):241-256.
    Proponents of actual intentionalism hold that an author’s actual intentions should constrain the proper interpretation of his or her works. If, for example, we have good reason to think Proust intends his character Marcel to set out to write a different novel from In Search of Lost Time itself, then that is how we should interpret the text. After decades of being denigrated as the ‘intentional fallacy’, actual intentionalism has enjoyed a renaissance in philosophical aesthetics in recent years, thanks in (...)
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  13. Berel Lang (1974). The Intentional Fallacy Revisited. British Journal of Aesthetics 14 (4):306-314.
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  14. Lawrence Lengbeyer (2005). Humor, Context, and Divided Cognition. Social Theory and Practice 31 (3):309-36.
    Those who suggest that only a sexist (or racist, or anti-semite) can experience amusement at a sexist (or racist, or anti-semitic) joke have failed to grasp two underappreciated features of the psychology of humor: (1) that amusement is sensitive to what is conveyed to the audience by the contexts within which a joke is taken to be situated, and hence to pragmatic, and not merely semantic, factors; and (2) that, given the non-integrated nature of the ordinary human cognitive system, the (...)
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  15. Jerrold Levinson (2010). Defending Hypothetical Intentionalism. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (2):139-150.
    I here defend hypothetical intentionalism, the view of literary and cinematic interpretation that I endorse, from some recent criticisms, and then illustrate the appeal of the view in connection with a recent film of enigmatic cast.
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  16. Paisley Livingston (2005). Art and Intention: A Philosophical Study. Oxford University Press.
    In Art and intention Paisley Livingston develops a broad and balanced perspective on perennial disputes between intentionalists and anti-intentionalists in philosophical aesthetics and critical theory. He surveys and assesses a wide range of rival assumptions about the nature of intentions and the status of intentionalist psychology. With detailed reference to examples from diverse media, art forms, and traditions, he demonstrates that insights into the multiple functions of intentions have important implications for our understanding of artistic creation and authorship, the ontology (...)
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  17. Christian Lotz (2012). Distant Presence: Representation, Painting and Photography in Gerhard Richter’s Reader. Painting and Photography in Gerhard Richter’s Reader,” Symposium. Canadian Journal for Continental Philosophy 16 (1):87-111.
    An essay concerning the representation of images in art, photography, and painting concerning analysis of Gerhard Richter's painting reader. It offers a debate that representation should be regarded as an act of formation and a performative concept. The author presents analysis of painting which leads the reader into the problem of painted images, such as the constitution of an image by a complex relationship among memory, reading, and blindness.
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  18. Colin Lyas (1983). Anything Goes: The Intentional Fallacy Revisited. British Journal of Aesthetics 23 (4):291-305.
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  19. Hans Maes (2010). Intention, Interpretation and Contemporary Visual Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (2):121-138.
    The role of the artist's intention in the interpretation of art has been the topic of a lively and ongoing discussion in analytic aesthetics. First, I sketch the current state of this debate, focusing especially on two competing views: actual and hypothetical intentionalism. Secondly, I discuss the search for a suitable test case, that is, a work of art that is interpreted differently by actual and hypothetical intentionalists, with only one of these interpretations being plausible. Many examples from many different (...)
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  20. Patrick Maynard (2012). What's So Funny? Comic Content in Depiction. In Cook Meskin (ed.), The Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This paper addresses standard questions regarding comics and the arts (comics and fine arts, image and word combinations), then poses and addresses the neglected, but deeper and wider--thus philosophical--question, of how depictions, not just words, can have mental contents at all, including light, funny, scathing, comic ones.
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  21. John Michael McGuire (1999). Pictorial Metaphors: A Reply to Sedivy. Metaphor and Symbol 14 (4):293-302.
    This article is concerned with the question of whether, and to what extent, the concept of metaphor properly applies to pictures (e.g., paintings or photographs). The question is approached dialectically through an examination of the views of Sonia Sedivy, who advances the following 4 claims: (a) that pictures possess propositional content, (b) that there are metaphoric pictures, (c) that metaphoric pictures do not possess metaphoric content, and (d) that there can be no theory of pictorial metaphor. Although the first of (...)
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  22. A. C. Ribeiro (2007). Review: Art and Intention: A Philosophical Study. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (462):453-459.
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  23. Emilio Roma Iii (1966). The Scope of The Intentional Fallacy. The Monist 50 (2):250-266.
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  24. Stephen Snyder (2010). Arthur Danto’s Andy Warhol: The Embodiment of Theory in Art and the Pragmatic Turn. Leitmotiv:135-151.
    Arthur Danto’s recent book, Andy Warhol, leads the reader through the story of the iconic American’s artistic life highlighted by a philosophical commentary, a commentary that merges Danto’s aesthetic theory with the artist himself. Inspired by Warhol’s Brillo Box installation, art that in Danto’s eyes was indiscernible from the everyday boxes it represented, Danto developed a theory that is able to differentiate art from non-art by employing the body of conceptual art theory manifest in what he termed the ‘artworld’. The (...)
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