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  1. D. M. Armstrong (1971). Meaning and Communication. Philosophical Review 80 (4):427-447.
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  2. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (1997). Husserl's Theory of Language as Calculus Ratiocinator. Synthese 112 (3):303-321.
    This paper defends an interpretation of Husserl''s theory of language, specifically as it appears in the Logical Investigations, as an example of a larger body of theories dubbed ''language as calculus''. Although this particular interpretation has been previously defended by other authors, such as Hintikka and Kusch, this paper proposes to contribute to the discussion by arguing that what makes this interpretation plausible are Husserl''s distinction between the notions of meaning-intention and meaning-fulfillment, his view that meaning is instantiated through meaning-intending (...)
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  3. Ben Blumson (2014). Depiction and Intention. In Resemblance and Representation. Open Book Publishers. 51-66.
  4. Ben Blumson (2009). Defining Depiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (2):143-157.
    It is a platitude that whereas language is mediated by convention, depiction is mediated by resemblance. But this platitude may be attacked on the grounds that resemblance is either insufficient for or incidental to depictive representation. I defend common sense from this attack by using Grice's analysis of meaning to specify the non-incidental role of resemblance in depictive representation.
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  5. H. G. Callaway (1993). Open Transcendentalism and the Normative Character of Methodology. Grazer Philosophische Studien 43 (July):1-24.
    This paper examines normative elements in Henri Lauener’s “open transcendentalism,” with an eye to evaluate distinctive theses. After setting out some of Lauener’s basic positions in this area, in comparison with related views in Quine’s work, I argue that the views surveyed converge on a normative and contextualist cognitivism in Lauener’s methodological and epistemological perspective. Though he resists similar conclusion in the name of anti-naturalism, I argue that his “open transcendentalism” is plausibly construed as a non reductive naturalism.
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  6. John R. Cook (2009). Is Davidson a Gricean? Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review/Revue canadienne de philosophie 48 (3):557-575.
    In his recent collection of essays, Language, Truth and History (2005), Donald Davidson appears to endorse a philosophy of language which gives primary importance to the notion of the speaker’s communicative intentions, a perspective on language not too dissimilar from that of Paul Grice. If that is right, then this would mark a major shift from the formal semanticist approach articulated and defended by Davidson in his Inquiries into Truth and Interpretation (1984). In this paper, I argue that although there (...)
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  7. John R. Cook (2006). Review of Donald Davidson's Truth, Language, and History. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review (6):399-401.
    Language, Truth, and History is an excellent volume of essays coming from one of the most important philosophers in the last fifty years. It would be of interest to anyone interested in the ways Davidson's philosophy evolved after the publication of the first two volumes, and it is essential reading for anyone working in philosophy of language or philosophy of mind.
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  8. Daniel Dohrn, Following Rules of Nature, Not the Pedestrian Muse: Reply to Yamada.
    I criticize Yamada's account of rule-following. Yamada's conditions are not necessary. And he misses the deepest level of the rule-following considerations: how meaning rules come about.
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  9. Mitchell S. Green, How to Express Yourself: Refinements and Elaborations on the Central Ideas of Self-Expression. Protosociology Forum.
    This articles gives an overview of the main themes and arguments of _Self-Expression_ (OUP,2007; paper, 2011), and responds to some recent publications in which that book is discussed. In the process of these responses, the article provides refinements and elaborations on some of the book's central claims.
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  10. Mitchell S. Green (2007). Self-Expression. Oxford University Press.
    Mitchell S. Green presents a systematic philosophical study of self-expression - a pervasive phenomenon of the everyday life of humans and other species, which has received scant attention in its own right. He explores the ways in which self-expression reveals our states of thought, feeling, and experience, and he defends striking new theses concerning a wide range of fascinating topics: our ability to perceive emotion in others, artistic expression, empathy, expressive language, meaning, facial expression, and speech acts. He draws on (...)
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  11. H. P. Grice (1989). Studies in the Way of Words. Harvard University Press.
  12. H. P. Grice (1957). Meaning. Philosophical Review 66 (3):377-388.
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  13. Paolo Leonardi (2001). The Act of Meaning. In G. Cosenza (ed.), Paul Grice's Heritage. 9--33.
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  14. Richard Moore, Kristin Liebal & Michael Tomasello (2013). Three-Year-Olds Understand Communicative Intentions Without Language, Gestures, or Gaze. Interaction Studies 14 (1):62-80.
    The communicative interactions of very young children almost always involve language (based on conventions), gesture (based on bodily deixis or iconicity) and directed gaze. In this study, ninety-six children (3;0 years) were asked to determine the location of a hidden toy by understanding a communicative act that contained none of these familiar means. A light-and-sound mechanism placed behind the hiding place and illuminated by a centrally placed switch was used to indicate the location of the toy. After a communicative training (...)
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  15. Stephen Neale (1992). Paul Grice and the Philosophy of Language. Linguistics and Philosophy 15 (5):509 - 559.
    The work of the late Paul Grice (1913–1988) exerts a powerful influence on the way philosophers, linguists, and cognitive scientists think about meaning and communication. With respect to a particular sentence φ and an “utterer” U, Grice stressed the philosophical importance of separating (i) what φ means, (ii) what U said on a given occasion by uttering φ, and (iii) what U meant by uttering φ on that occasion. Second, he provided systematic attempts to say precisely what meaning is by (...)
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  16. Prashant Parikh (2000). Communication, Meaning, and Interpretation. Linguistics and Philosophy 23 (2):185-212.
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  17. Prashant Parikh (1991). Communication and Strategic Inference. Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (5):473 - 514.
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  18. Jennifer M. Saul (2002). What is Said and Psychological Reality; Grice's Project and Relevance Theorists' Criticisms. Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (3):347-372.
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  19. Sarah Sawyer (ed.) (2009). New Waves in the Philosophy of Language. Palgrave.
  20. Stephen R. Schiffer (1972). Meaning. Oxford,Clarendon Press.
    What is it for marks or sounds to have meaning, and what is it for someone to mean something in producing them? Answering these and related questions, Schiffer explores communication, speech acts, convention, and the meaning of linguistic items in this reissue of a seminal work on the foundations of meaning. A new introduction takes account of recent developments and places his theory in a broader context.
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  21. Jeff Speaks (2009). Introduction, Transmission, and the Foundations of Meaning. In Sarah Sawyer (ed.), New Waves in Philosophy of Language. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The most widely accepted and well worked out approaches to the foundations of meaning take facts about the meanings of linguistic expressions at a time to be derivative from the propositional attitudes of speakers of the language at that time. This mentalist strategy takes two principal forms, one which traces meaning to belief, and one which analyzes it in terms of communicative intentions. I argue that either form of mentalism fails, and conclude by suggesting that we can do better by (...)
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  22. P. F. Strawson (1964). Intention and Convention in Speech Acts. Philosophical Review 73 (4):439-460.
  23. Frank Vlach (1981). Speaker's Meaning. Linguistics and Philosophy 4 (3):359 - 391.
    The strongest objection to (15) is that speaker's meaning is defined in terms of commitment, a notion which is itself something of a challenge and for which no definition has been given. This would be a strong reason to prefer a definition in terms of some more tractable concept, all things being equal; but it does not lessen the probability that commitment or some similar notion is indispensable to the definition of speaker's meaning.The philosophical writings discussed in this paper all (...)
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  24. Roger Wertheimer (1975). Review of Stephen Schiffer, Meaning. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 84 (2):267-70.
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  25. Tim Wharton (2003). Natural Pragmatics and Natural Codes. Mind and Language 18 (5):447–477.
    Grice (1957) drew a distinction between natural(N) and non–natural(NN) meaning, and showed how the latter might be characterised in terms of intentions and the recognition of intentions. Focussing on the role of natural signs and natural behaviours in communication, this paper makes two main points. First, verbal communication often involves a mixture of natural and non–natural meaning and there is a continuum of cases between showing and meaningNN. This suggests that pragmatics is best seen as a theory of intentional verbal (...)
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