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  1. Susan M. Allan, Barret W. S. Lane, James J. Misrahi, Richard S. Murray, Grace R. Schuyler, Jason Thomas & Myles V. Lynk (2007). Incident at Airport X: Quarantine Law and Limits. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35:117-117.
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  2. Daniele Archibugi & Mathias Koenig-Archibugi (eds.) (2003). Debating Cosmopolitics. Verso.
    Cosmopolitics, the concept of a world politics based on shared democratic values, is in an increasingly fragile state.
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  3. Marcus Arvan (2012). Reconceptualizing Human Rights. Journal of Global Ethics 8 (1):91-105.
    This paper defends several highly revisionary theses about human rights. §1 shows that the phrase “human rights” refers to two distinct types of moral claims. §§2-3 argue that several longstanding problems in human rights theory and practice can be solved if, and only if, the concept of a “human right” is replaced by two more exact concepts: (A) International human rights: moral claims sufficient to warrant coercive domestic and international social protection; and (B) Domestic human rights: moral claims sufficient to (...)
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  4. Jean D' Aspremont (2011). Formalism and the Sources of International Law: A Theory of the Ascertainment of Legal Rules. Oxford University Press.
    This book revisits the theory of the sources of international law from the perspective of formalism.
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  5. Jennifer Beard (2006). The Political Economy of Desire: International Law, Development and the Nation State. Routledge-Cavendish.
    This book offers an intelligent and thought-provoking analysis of the genealogy of Western capitalist 'development'. Jennifer Beard departs from the common position that development and underdevelopment are conceptual outcomes of the Imperialist Era and positions the genealogy of development within early Christian writings in which the western theological concepts of sin, salvation, and redemption are expounded. In doing so, she links the early Christian writings of theologians such as Augustine and , Anselm and Abelard to the processes of modern identity (...)
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  6. Endre Begby (2012). Collective Responsibility for Unjust Wars. Politics 32 (2):100-108.
    This article argues against Anna Stilz's recent attempt to solve the problem of citizens' collective responsibility in democratic states. I show that her solution could only apply to state actions that are (in legal terminology) unjustified but excusable. Stilz's marquee case – the 2003 invasion of Iraq – does not, I will argue, fit this bill; nor, in all likelihood, does any other case in recorded history. Thus, this article concludes, we may allow that Stilz's argument offers a theoretically cogent (...)
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  7. Endre Begby (2010). Rawlsian Compromises in Peacebuilding? Response to Agafonow. Public Reason 2 (2):51-60.
    This paper responds to recent criticism from Alejandro Agafonow. In section I, I argue that the dilemma that Agafonow points to – while real – is in no way unique to liberal peacebuilding. Rather, it arises with respect to any foreign involvement in post-conflict reconstruction. I argue further that Agafonow’s proposal for handling this dilemma suffers from several shortcomings: first, it provides no sense of the magnitude and severity of the “oppressive practices” that peacebuilders should be willing to institutionalize. Second, (...)
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  8. Seyla Benhabib (2009). International Law and Human Plurality in the Shadow of Totalitarianism: Hannah Arendt and Raphael Lemkin. Constellations 16 (2):331-350.
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  9. Seyla Benhabib (2005). On the Alleged Conflict Between Democracy and International Law. Ethics and International Affairs 19 (1):85–100.
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  10. Jeremy Bentham, Principals of International Law.
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  11. Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.) (2010). The Philosophy of International Law. Oxford University Press.
    The other contributions address philosophical problems arising in specific domains of international law, such as human rights law, international economic law, ...
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  12. Anat Biletzki (2010). Politicizing Human Rights (Using International Law). In Larry May & Zachary Hoskins (eds.), International Criminal Law and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
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  13. Michael Blake (2012). International Law and Global Justice. In Marmor Andrei (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Law. Routledge.
  14. Michael Blake (2008). Allen Buchanan,Justice, Legitimacy, and Self‐Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law:Justice, Legitimacy, and Self‐Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law. Ethics 118 (4):721-726.
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  15. Philip Bobbitt (1996). Public International Law. In Dennis M. Patterson (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell Publishers.
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  16. Adam Branch (2005). American Morality Over International Law: Origins in UN Military Interventions, 1991-1995. Constellations 12 (1):103-127.
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  17. John Briscoe (1975). International Law in the Hellenistic Period. The Classical Review 25 (02):281-.
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  18. Allen E. Buchanan (2004). Justice, Legitimacy, and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law. Oxford University Press.
    This book articulates a systematic vision of an international legal system grounded in the commitment to justice for all persons. It provides a probing exploration of the moral issues involved in disputes about secession, ethno-national conflict, "the right of self-determination of peoples," human rights, and the legitimacy of the international legal system itself. Buchanan advances vigorous criticisms of the central dogmas of international relations and international law, arguing that the international legal system should make justice, not simply peace among states, (...)
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  19. Allen Buchanan & Russell Powell (2008). Survey Article: Constitutional Democracy and the Rule of International Law: Are They Compatible? Journal of Political Philosophy 16 (3):326-349.
  20. C. D. Burns (1929). Book Review:L. Oppenheim: International Law. A. D. McNair. [REVIEW] Ethics 39 (3):366-.
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  21. Daniel Butt (2009). ‘Victors’ Justice’? Historic Injustice and the Legitimacy of International Law. In Lukas H. Meyer (ed.), Legitimacy, Justice and Public International Law. Cambridge Univeristy Press. 163.
  22. H. G. Callaway (2012). Review of Cassese, Five Masters of International Law. [REVIEW] Law and Politics Book Review 22 (1):154-161.
    Focused on five prominent scholars of international law, and casting light on the related institutions which frequently engaged them, the present book provides insight into chief currents of international law during the last decades of the twentieth century. Spanning the gap, in some degree, between Anglo-American and continental approaches to international law, the volume consists of short intellectual portraits, combined with interviews, of selected specialists in international law. The interviews were conducted by the editor, Antonio Cassese, between 1993 and 1995 (...)
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  23. H. G. Callaway (ed.) (2011). Alexander James Dallas: An Exposition of the Causes and Character of the War. An Annotated Edition. Dunedin Academic Press.
    Alexander James Dallas' An Exposition of the Causes and Character of the War was written as part of an effort by the then US government to explain and justify its declaration of war in 1812. However publication coincided with the ratification of the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War. The Exposition is especially interesting for the insight it provides into the self-constraint of American foreign policy and of the conduct of a war. The focus is on the foreign policy (...)
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  24. H. G. Callaway (2009). Review of D.W. Howe, What Hath God Wrought. [REVIEW] History News Network, Online 2009.
    This is my review of D.W. Howe's 2007 book, What Hath God Wrought, Transformation of America 1815-1848. The book is a volume in the new Oxford History of the U.S.(O.U.P. 2007)--exploring the transformation of the early American republic through the period of domination of the Jacksonian Democrats. This is also the period of the New England Renaissance and the early work of R.W. Emerson. Howe devotes a good deal of attention to Emerson and his influence and thereby provides needed historical (...)
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  25. Patrick Capps (2009). Human Dignity and the Foundations of International Law. Hart.
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  26. Guido Carducci (2008). Repatriation", "Restitution" and "Return" of "Cultural Property" : International Law and Practice. In Mille Gabriel & Jens Dahl (eds.), Utimut: Past Heritage - Future Partnerships, Discussions on Repatriation in the 21st Century /Mille Gabriel & Jens Dahl, Editors. International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs and Greenland National Museum & Archives.
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  27. Paolo G. Carozza (2006). The Universal Common Good and the Authority of International Law. Logos 9 (1).
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  28. I͡U. V. Chaĭkovsʹkyĭ (2010). Filosofsʹki Zasady Stanovlenni͡a Miz͡hnarodnoho Prava: Monohrafii͡a. Feniks.
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  29. Anthony Chase (2007). Leiden Journal of International Law. Historical Materialism 15 (1):223-239.
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  30. Francis Cheneval (2000). Steven V. Hicks, International Law and the Possibility of a Just World Order. An Essay on Hegel's Universalism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (4):457-459.
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  31. Jean L. Cohen (2008). A Global State of Emergency or the Further Constitutionalization of International Law: A Pluralist Approach. Constellations 15 (4):456-484.
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  32. Jean L. Cohen (2004). Whose Sovereignty? Empire Versus International Law. Ethics and International Affairs 18 (3):1–24.
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  33. David Copp (1998). International Law and Morality in the Theory of Secession. Journal of Ethics 2 (3):219-245.
    In order responsibly to decide whether there ought to be an international legal right of secession, I believe we need an account of the morality of secession. I propose that territorial and political societies have a moral right to secede, and on that basis I propose a regime designed to give such groups an international legal right to secede. This regime would create a procedure that could be followed by groups desiring to secede or by states desiring to resolve the (...)
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  34. Claudio Corradetti (2009). Can Human Rights Be Exported? Rethinking the Relation Between Human Rights and Transplantability. In Antonina Bakardjieva Engelbrekt (ed.), New Directions in Comparative Law. Edward Elgar.
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  35. Charles Covell (1998). Kant and the Law of Peace: A Study in the Philosophy of International Law and International Relations. St. Martin's Press.
    Charles Covell examines the jurisprudential aspects of Kant's international thought, with particular reference to the argument of the treatise Perpetual Peace (1795). The book begins with a general outline of Kant's moral and political philosophy. In the discussion of Perpetual Peace that follows, it is explained how Kant saw law as providing the basis for peace among men and states in the international sphere, and how, in his exposition of the elements of the law of peace, Kant broke with the (...)
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  36. Jovana Davidovic (2012). International Rule-of-Law and Killing in War. Social Theory and Practice 38 (3):531-553.
    In this paper, I suggest that for some proposed solutions to global justice problems, incompatibility with the necessary features of international law is a reason to reject them. I illustrate this by discussing the problem raised by the case of unjust combatants, that is, combatants lacking a just cause for war. I argue that the principle of inequality of combatants, which suggests that we ought to prohibit those without a just cause for war from fighting, is not only a bad (...)
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  37. Helena de Bres (2010). Review of Allen Buchanan, Human Rights, Legitimacy, and the Use of Force. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).
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  38. Amar Dhall (2011). Neo-Naturalism: A Fresh Paradigm in International Law. World Futures 66 (5):363-380.
    Dhall (2010) posited that quantum holism can provide an alternate justification for human rights. This article explores how such a foundation challenges aspects of international law and assertions of cultural relativism that have stymied the ongoing development of a universal human rights culture.
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  39. Jasper Doomen (2011). The Meaning of ‘International Law’. The International Lawyer 45 (3):881-893.
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  40. Jude P. Dougherty (2006). The Limits of International Law. Review of Metaphysics 60 (1):157-158.
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  41. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (forthcoming). Citizenship and Obligation. In Julie Dickson & Pavlos Eleftheriadis (eds.), Philosophical Foundations of European Union Law. Oxford University Press.
    Many political philosophers believe that we owe moral obligations to our political communities simply because we are asked. We are, for example to pay taxes, or serve in the army whenever we are demanded to do so by the competent authorities or agencies. Can such moral obligations be created by European Union institutions? This essay discusses the natural duty of justice to support just or nearly just political institutions as defended by John Rawls and Jeremy Waldron. It suggests that European (...)
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  42. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (forthcoming). The Law of Laws. Transnational Legal Theory 1 (3).
    How can legal orders coexist? Contemporary lawyers and philosophers frequently accept that a legal system operates under its own terms and is shaped by its own participants. Any problems posed by the plurality of legal orders in the world are to be dealt with by each legal order separately. So persons that are caught in transnational disputes because they are subject to two or more jurisdictions, have recourse to private international law, which is always part of domestic law, i.e. the (...)
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  43. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (forthcoming). The Moral Distinctiveness of the European Union. International Journal of Constitutional Law.
    This article is a comment and reflection on Joseph Weiler’s essay ‘The Political and Legal Culture of the European Union: an Exploratory Essay.’ The article responds to Weiler’s argument by sketching a philosophical framework within which we may understand the moral distinctness of the European Union. The argument is informed by the international political theories outlined by Kant and Rawls, according to which the domain of international institutions is distinct from that of domestic politics. If the European Union is an (...)
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  44. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (2009). The Universality of Rights. Indian Journal of Constitutional Law 3 (1):52-73.
  45. Gerard Elfstrom (1999). Fernando R. Teson, A Philosophy of International Law:A Philosophy of International Law. Ethics 110 (1):229-233.
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  46. Barbara Emadi-Coffin (2002). Rethinking International Organization: Deregulation and Global Governance. Routledge.
    The function of the state as a symbol of identity has become increasingly important as major powers of the pre-Cold War era have given way to self-determination. The conventional role of the state has, however, simultaneously been challenged by the process of globalization which transcends such national boundaries. In this book, Barbara Emadi-Coffin seeks to explain this contradiction through a radical new theory. Emadi-Coffin analyzes the increasing interaction of multinational corporations, international organizations and transnational interest groups, such as Greenpeace and (...)
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  47. David Fagelson (2003). Building Democracy And The Rule of Law. Polity 36 (1):139-151.
  48. Richard Falk (1989). Inhibiting Reliance on Biological Weaponry: The Role and Relevance of International Law. Ethics and International Affairs 3 (1):183–204.
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  49. David Felder (1977). Command Theory and International Law. World Futures 15 (3):299-306.
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  50. David P. Fidler & Lawrence O. Gostin (2006). The New International Health Regulations: An Historic Development for International Law and Public Health. Journal of Law, Medicine Ethics 34 (1):85-94.
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