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  1. Asher Alkoby, Theories of Compliance with International Law and the Challenge of Cultural Difference.
    This Article reviews the literature on international legal compliance in international law (IL) and international relations (IR) literatures, and examines the extent to which the competing theories contemplate the impact of culture on state behaviour. When compared to the alternatives, the constructivist approach to compliance holds greater potential for a direct engagement with challenge of diversity, but this potential is yet to be fully realized. The constructivist reliance on acculturation, as a method of inducing conformity with legal norms assumes a (...)
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  2. Susan M. Allan, Barret W. S. Lane, James J. Misrahi, Richard S. Murray, Grace R. Schuyler, Jason Thomas & Myles V. Lynk (2007). Incident at Airport X: Quarantine Law and Limits. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (s4):117-117.
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  3. Paul Schiff Berman and, Federalism and International Law Through the Lens of Legal Pluralism.
    Sovereignty has long been the dominant lens through which we view both federalism and international law. From the perspective of sovereignty, both federalism and international law are primarily about drawing clear boundaries and demarcations between separate, autonomous power centers. Recently, however, a group of scholars have embraced a more pluralist approach to both American federalism and international law. They have touted the important virtues of jurisdictional redundancy and inter-systemic governance models in which multiple legal and regulatory authorities weigh in regarding (...)
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  4. Santiago Aragon (2005). Le Rayonnement International de la Société Zoologique D'Acclimatation: Participation de l'Espagne Entre 1854 Et 1861/The International Influence of the Société Zoologique D'Acclimatation: Spanish Participation Between 1854 and 1861. [REVIEW] Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 58 (1):169-206.
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  5. Santiago Aragon (2005). The International Influence of the Societe Zoologique D'Acclimatation: Spanish Participation Between 1854 and 1861. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 58 (1).
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  6. Robert J. Araujo (2007). The Role of International Law in US Constitutional Law—A Question That Might Be Posed by John Courtney Murray. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 4 (1):35-58.
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  7. Daniele Archibugi & Mathias Koenig-Archibugi (eds.) (2003). Debating Cosmopolitics. Verso.
    Cosmopolitics, the concept of a world politics based on shared democratic values, is in an increasingly fragile state.
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  8. Marcus Arvan (2012). Reconceptualizing Human Rights. Journal of Global Ethics 8 (1):91-105.
    This paper defends several highly revisionary theses about human rights. §1 shows that the phrase “human rights” refers to two distinct types of moral claims. §§2-3 argue that several longstanding problems in human rights theory and practice can be solved if, and only if, the concept of a “human right” is replaced by two more exact concepts: (A) International human rights: moral claims sufficient to warrant coercive domestic and international social protection; and (B) Domestic human rights: moral claims sufficient to (...)
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  9. Jean D' Aspremont (2011). Formalism and the Sources of International Law: A Theory of the Ascertainment of Legal Rules. Oxford University Press.
    This book revisits the theory of the sources of international law from the perspective of formalism.
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  10. Larry Catá Backer, The Fuhrer Principle of International Law: Individual Responsibility and Collective Punishment.
    I offer here an extended Nietzschean joke: the necessity of error in the constitution of individual authority and communal power. Communities - the nation-state, religious communities, terrorist organizations - are arranged through a cultivation of error: mistaking causes for effects, assuming a false causality, creating an imagined causality, and assuming a free will. These errors of causation, these miscausations, have been offered as a means through which leaders or leader classes - the judge, the priest, the king, the president, the (...)
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  11. Antonina Bakardjieva Engelbrekt (ed.) (2009). New Directions in Comparative Law. Edward Elgar.
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  12. Jennifer Beard (2006). The Political Economy of Desire: International Law, Development and the Nation State. Routledge-Cavendish.
    This book offers an intelligent and thought-provoking analysis of the genealogy of Western capitalist 'development'. Jennifer Beard departs from the common position that development and underdevelopment are conceptual outcomes of the Imperialist Era and positions the genealogy of development within early Christian writings in which the western theological concepts of sin, salvation, and redemption are expounded. In doing so, she links the early Christian writings of theologians such as Augustine and , Anselm and Abelard to the processes of modern identity (...)
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  13. Endre Begby (2012). Collective Responsibility for Unjust Wars. POLITICS 32 (2):100-108.
    This article argues against Anna Stilz's recent attempt to solve the problem of citizens' collective responsibility in democratic states. I show that her solution could only apply to state actions that are (in legal terminology) unjustified but excusable. Stilz's marquee case – the 2003 invasion of Iraq – does not, I will argue, fit this bill; nor, in all likelihood, does any other case in recorded history. Thus, this article concludes, we may allow that Stilz's argument offers a theoretically cogent (...)
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  14. Endre Begby (2010). Rawlsian Compromises in Peacebuilding? Response to Agafonow. Public Reason 2 (2):51-60.
    This paper responds to recent criticism from Alejandro Agafonow. In section I, I argue that the dilemma that Agafonow points to – while real – is in no way unique to liberal peacebuilding. Rather, it arises with respect to any foreign involvement in post-conflict reconstruction. I argue further that Agafonow’s proposal for handling this dilemma suffers from several shortcomings: first, it provides no sense of the magnitude and severity of the “oppressive practices” that peacebuilders should be willing to institutionalize. Second, (...)
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  15. Seyla Benhabib (2009). International Law and Human Plurality in the Shadow of Totalitarianism: Hannah Arendt and Raphael Lemkin. Constellations 16 (2):331-350.
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  16. Seyla Benhabib (2005). On the Alleged Conflict Between Democracy and International Law. Ethics and International Affairs 19 (1):85–100.
    Benhabib examines one set of cosmopolitan norms determining a German Constitutional Court Case which denied long-term resident aliens voting privileges in local and district-wide elections, illuminating the “paradox of democratic legitimacy.”.
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  17. Jeremy Bentham, Principals of International Law.
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  18. Eyal Benvenisti, The Conception of International Law as a Legal System.
    Perhaps the most distinctive aspect of the German approach to public law in general and to public international law in particular is the systemic vision: the effort to envision the various legal norms as arranged within a hierarchy, composing together a coherent, logical order. This essay highlights what I believe to be the contribution of this systemic vision to international law and politics. This approach has contributed significantly to the emergent conception of international law as a legal system. The system (...)
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  19. Jean-Louis Bergel (ed.) (2005). Le Plurijuridisme: Actes du 8ème Congrés de l'Association Internationale de Méthodologie Juridique (Aix-En-Provence, 4-6 Septembre 2003). [REVIEW] Presses Universitaires d'Aix-Marseille.
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  20. Samantha Besson & Jos Luis Mart (eds.) (2009). Legal Republicanism: National and International Perspectives. Oup Oxford.
    Interest in republicanism as a political theory has burgeoned in recent years, but its implications for the understanding of law have remained largely unexplored. Legal Republicanism is the first book to offer a comprehensive, critical survey of the potential for creating republican accounts of fundamental issues in law and legal theory.
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  21. Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.) (2010). The Philosophy of International Law. Oxford University Press.
    The other contributions address philosophical problems arising in specific domains of international law, such as human rights law, international economic law, ...
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  22. Anat Biletzki (2010). Politicizing Human Rights (Using International Law). In Larry May & Zachary Hoskins (eds.), International Criminal Law and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
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  23. Michael Blake (2012). International Law and Global Justice. In Marmor Andrei (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Law. Routledge.
  24. Michael Blake (2008). Allen Buchanan,Justice, Legitimacy, and Self‐Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law:Justice, Legitimacy, and Self‐Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law. Ethics 118 (4):721-726.
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  25. Andrew Blom, Grotius, Hugo. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Hugo Grotius (1583—1645) Hugo Grotius was a Dutch humanist and jurist whose philosophy of natural law had a major impact on the development of seventeenth century political thought and on the moral theories of the Enlightenment. Valorized by contemporary international theorists as the father of international law, his work on sovereignty, international rights of commerce […].
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  26. Philip Bobbitt (1996). Public International Law. In Dennis M. Patterson (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell Publishers.
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  27. Patrick Joseph Borchers, Categorical Exemptions in Party Autonomy in Private International Law.
    While history records resistance, choice-of-law and choice-of-forum clauses enjoy widespread enforcement in the United States and Europe today as a recognition of the value of party autonomy in transactions increases. Yet not all such clauses can be enforced -- imagine a murder-for-hire contract that attempted to circumvent strong forum policy against murder through a choice-of-law clause. The methods by which the United States and Europe determine whether such clauses should be unenforceable differ, and their substantive results are also diverging. As (...)
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  28. Adam Branch (2005). American Morality Over International Law: Origins in UN Military Interventions, 1991-1995. Constellations 12 (1):103-127.
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  29. Ronald A. Brand, Community Competence for Matters of Judicial Cooperation at the Hague Conference on Private International Law: A View From the United States.
    The Amsterdam Treaty's introduction of Article 65 into the European Community Treaty took little time to achieve practical importance. In fact, the questions were practical as early as they were theoretical. A 1992 request by the United States that the Hague Conference on Private International Law negotiate a global convention on jurisdiction and the recognition of civil judgments resulted in a laboratory for the new-found competence of the Community. Thus, negotiations already underway--which included delegations from all 15 EU Member States--were (...)
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  30. Ronald A. Brand, The Lugano Case in the European Court of Justice: Evolving European Union Competence in Private International Law.
    On October 19, 2004, the European Court of Justice held its first en banc hearing since the 2004 enlargement to twenty-five Member States. The case was Opinion 1/03, involving a request by the Council of the European Union on whether the Community has exclusive or shared competence to conclude the Lugano Convention. While the case on its face deals only with a single convention, it has far broader implications and is likely to influence the development of private international law and (...)
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  31. John Briscoe (1975). International Law in the Hellenistic Period. The Classical Review 25 (02):281-.
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  32. Seyla Brunkhorst (2012). International Law and Human Plurality in the Shadow of Totalitarianism : Hannah Arendt and Raphael Lemkin. In Marco Goldoni & Christopher McCorkindale (eds.), Hannah Arendt and the Law. Hart Pub.2.
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  33. Allen E. Buchanan (2004). Justice, Legitimacy, and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law. Oxford University Press.
    This book articulates a systematic vision of an international legal system grounded in the commitment to justice for all persons. It provides a probing exploration of the moral issues involved in disputes about secession, ethno-national conflict, "the right of self-determination of peoples," human rights, and the legitimacy of the international legal system itself. Buchanan advances vigorous criticisms of the central dogmas of international relations and international law, arguing that the international legal system should make justice, not simply peace among states, (...)
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  34. Allen Buchanan & Russell Powell (2008). Survey Article: Constitutional Democracy and the Rule of International Law: Are They Compatible? Journal of Political Philosophy 16 (3):326-349.
  35. C. D. Burns (1929). Book Review:L. Oppenheim: International Law. A. D. McNair. [REVIEW] Ethics 39 (3):366-.
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  36. Daniel Butt (2009). ‘Victors’ Justice’? Historic Injustice and the Legitimacy of International Law. In Lukas H. Meyer (ed.), Legitimacy, Justice and Public International Law. Cambridge Univeristy Press. 163.
  37. H. G. Callaway (2012). Review of Cassese, Five Masters of International Law. [REVIEW] Law and Politics Book Review 22 (1):154-161.
    Focused on five prominent scholars of international law, and casting light on the related institutions which frequently engaged them, the present book provides insight into chief currents of international law during the last decades of the twentieth century. Spanning the gap, in some degree, between Anglo-American and continental approaches to international law, the volume consists of short intellectual portraits, combined with interviews, of selected specialists in international law. The interviews were conducted by the editor, Antonio Cassese, between 1993 and 1995 (...)
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  38. H. G. Callaway (ed.) (2011). Alexander James Dallas: An Exposition of the Causes and Character of the War. An Annotated Edition. Dunedin Academic Press.
    Alexander James Dallas' An Exposition of the Causes and Character of the War was written as part of an effort by the then US government to explain and justify its declaration of war in 1812. However publication coincided with the ratification of the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War. The Exposition is especially interesting for the insight it provides into the self-constraint of American foreign policy and of the conduct of a war. The focus is on the foreign policy (...)
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  39. H. G. Callaway (2009). Review of D.W. Howe, What Hath God Wrought. [REVIEW] History News Network, Online 2009.
    This is my review of D.W. Howe's 2007 book, What Hath God Wrought, Transformation of America 1815-1848. The book is a volume in the new Oxford History of the U.S.(O.U.P. 2007)--exploring the transformation of the early American republic through the period of domination of the Jacksonian Democrats. This is also the period of the New England Renaissance and the early work of R.W. Emerson. Howe devotes a good deal of attention to Emerson and his influence and thereby provides needed historical (...)
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  40. J. E. Cantwell (1943). The Foundations and the Future of International Law. Modern Schoolman 20 (2):116-117.
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  41. Patrick Capps (2012). Philosophy for International Lawyers. Jurisprudence 2 (2):521-528.
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  42. Patrick Capps (2009). Human Dignity and the Foundations of International Law. Hart.
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  43. Guido Carducci (2008). Repatriation", "Restitution" and "Return" of "Cultural Property" : International Law and Practice. In Mille Gabriel & Jens Dahl (eds.), Utimut: Past Heritage - Future Partnerships, Discussions on Repatriation in the 21st Century /Mille Gabriel & Jens Dahl, Editors. International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs and Greenland National Museum & Archives.
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  44. Paolo G. Carozza (2006). The Universal Common Good and the Authority of International Law. Logos 9 (1).
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  45. Boyd Carpenter (1931). The Ethical Basis of International Law. Thought 5 (4):670-673.
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  46. Anthony Carty (1986). The Decay of International Law? A Reappraisal of the Limits of Legal Imagination in International Affairs. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  47. I͡U. V. Chaĭkovsʹkyĭ (2010). Filosofsʹki Zasady Stanovlenni͡a Miz͡hnarodnoho Prava: Monohrafii͡a. Feniks.
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  48. Clara Chapdelaine-Feliciati (2013). The Sense, Meaning, and Significance of the Twin International Covenants on Political and Economic Rights. Semiotica 2013 (196):325-352.
    Journal Name: Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotique Volume: 2013 Issue: 196 Pages: 325-352.
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  49. Helen Charnley (2007). Reflections on the Roles and Performance of International Organizations in Supporting Children Separated From Their Families by War. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (3):253-268.
    During the 16-year civil war in Mozambique thousands of children were separated from their families as a direct or indirect result of conflict and displacement. International organizations lent support to a national family tracing and reunification programme coordinated by the government Department for Social Action. Drawing on the findings of an empirical study of the sustainability of substitute family care, this article describes the tensions associated with the involvement of international organizations during the emergency conditions of the war, in post-war (...)
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  50. Anthony Chase (2007). Leiden Journal of International Law. Historical Materialism 15 (1):223-239.
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