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  1. Douglas I. O. Anele (2010). Western Technical Civilization and Regional Cultures in Nigeria. Cultura 7 (2):38-53.
    This paper examines the impact of the introduction of Western (European) technical civilization on regional cultures in Nigeria, using Igboland in South-EasternNigeria as a test case. It begins with a discussion of some general features of Western technical civilization whose evolution has been profoundly influenced by technological advances in Europe and her cultural colonies in North America and elsewhere. Consequences of the contact between Western technical civilization and traditional Igbo culture are also examined. The paper concludes by discussing the challenging (...)
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  2. Luís Frederico Antunes (2007). À Margem da escritaOn the Edge of Writing: Communication Between Indian Merchant and Portuguese Authorities in East Africa. Cultura:75-88.
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  3. Scott Burchill (ed.) (2010). Guo Ji Guan Xi Li Lun. Shi Ying Chu Ban She.
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  4. Madalena D.’Oliveira-Martins (2012). The New Feminine Emotional Codes in Hochschild. Cultura 9 (1):235-247.
    For some years now, amongst contemporary Western societies (where capitalism and globalization have a great influence), the presence and developmentof a well-defined and peculiar emotional culture has become clear. The appropriate use and management of emotions, support a system of relations and codes that draw new limits between public and private life and between people and their actions. Arlie Russell Hochschild has studied the dynamics of emotions, aiming to define their distinctive languages. Interactions between the public and the individual realm (...)
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  5. David P. Fidler (2003). SARS: Political Pathology of the First Post-Westphalian Pathogen. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):485-505.
  6. George Grant (2008). Time as History. In Barbara Ward (ed.), More Lost Massey Lectures: Recovered Classics From Five Great Thinkers. Distributed in the United States by Publishers Group West.
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  7. G. Mercer (1974). Formal Political Education and the Perception of International Conflict. Journal of Moral Education 4 (1):67-73.
    Abstract: This article is concerned with the perception of international conflict among some 2,400 Scots adolescents. The focus is upon the development of a more abstract view of such terms as war and peace, including the responsibility for such situations. Having obtained a picture of age based changes in these political attitudes we examine the relative impact of selected socialization agents, and finally superimpose a further analysis of the relative impact of a course in political education given in Scottish schools. (...)
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Colonialism and Postcolonialism
  1. Vassos Argyrou (2005). The Logic of Environmentalism: Anthropology, Ecology, and Postcoloniality. Berghahn Books.
    This bold argument is at the center of this book that challenges the widespread assumption that environmentalism reflects a radical departure from modernity.
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  2. Barbara Arneil (1996). John Locke and America: The Defence of English Colonialism. Oxford Unioversity Press.
    This book considers the context of the colonial policies of Britain, Locke's contribution to them, and the importance of these ideas in his theory of property. It also reconsiders the debate about John Locke's influence in America. The book argues that Locke's theory of property must be understood in connection with the philosopher's political concerns, as part of his endeavour to justify the colonialist policies of Lord Shaftesbury's cabinet, with which he was personally associated. The author maintains that traditional scholarship (...)
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  3. Ingrid Bartsch (1999). Book Review: Sandra Harding. Is Science Multicultural? Postcolonialisms, Feminisms, and Epistemologies. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (1):132-135.
  4. Jeffrey Bercuson (2012). Do Rawls's Theories of Justice Fit Together? A Reply to Pogge. Journal of Global Ethics 8 (2-3):251-267.
    In my reply to Pogge's critique of Rawls's international relations theory, I will try to show two things: (1) that Pogge's account of the public criterion of domestic social justice endorsed by Rawls is a partial one and (2) that this leads him to wrongly postulate a significant asymmetry between Rawls's domestic and international theories of justice. In the end, I hope to show that the domestic and international accounts are characterized by a significant degree of symmetry ? that both (...)
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  5. R. Bleiker (2008). Review Essay: Traversing Patagonia: New Writings on Postcolonial International Relations. Political Theory 36 (2):313-320.
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  6. Krzysztof Brzechczyn (1993). Unsuccessful Conquest and Successful Subordination. A Contribution to the Theory of Intersocial Relations. Poznań Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 33:445-456.
    The aim of this paper is to extend the Leszek Nowak's theory of socialist empire by introducing weaker forms of intersocial relation, e. gr. unsuccessful attempt at conquest and subordination. In the light of concretization of the model of socialist empire some facts from history of Soviet Union (intervention of the Entente and World War II) and socialist countries (autonomy of Albania and Romania in socialist bloc) are explained.
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  7. Anna Carastathis (2010). Fanon on Turtle Island: Revisiting the Question of Violence. In Elizabeth A. Hoppe & Tracey Nicholls (eds.), Fanon and the Decolonization of Philosophy. Lexington (Rowman & Littlefield). 77.
    In this chapter, I explore the role of violence in colonial rule and its role in decolonization struggle by posing the question, “what is alive in Fanon’s thought?” What can Fanon tell us about white settler state power and Fourth World decolonization struggles? I explore the relevance of Fanon’s account to the ongoing colonial situation on the northern part of Anówara Kawennote (Turtle Island), occupied by Canada. In this analysis, I am informed by Kanien’kehaka (Mohawk) political philosopher Taiaiake Alfred. I (...)
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  8. George Ciccariello-Maher (2014). Decolonial Realism: Ethics, Politics and Dialectics in Fanon and Dussel. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (1):2.
  9. Vijay Devadas & Brett Nicholls (2002). Postcolonial Interventions: Gayatri Spivak, Three Wise Men and the Native Informant. Critical Horizons 3 (1):73-101.
    This article responds to Terry Eagleton's claim that Spivak's latest book, A Critique of Postcolonial Reason, works against the intent of postcolonial criticism. Reading the work as a search for a just representational strategy, we explore the implications of Spivak's engagement with philosophy - Kant, Hegel, and Marx. As a disciplinary machine, philosophy produces Western subjects who are engendered by simultaneously including and excluding the other. Working through this production of the double location of the 'other' we suggest that systematic (...)
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  10. David Gandolfo (2008). The Ethical Threshold. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 15 (1):22-31.
    For the economic and political processes being brought about in the name of the current wave of globalization to be ethical, they must avoid recapitulating the processes of the previous wave of globalization: colonialism. The paper discusses the logic of colonialism and a minimum requirement that the current globalization would have to fulfill in order to finally and definitively overcome the colonial structures inherited from the previous globalization: it must be democratic. It is argued that supranational democratic structures are, thus, (...)
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  11. Nigel C. Gibson (2011). Speaking the Truth in Uncertain Times. Clr James Journal 17 (1):133-152.
    The impetus for this paper was the attack on the shack dweller movement in South Africa in September 2009. One question that emerged from the attack is what can committed intellectuals do to create active solidarity with movements of "the damned of the earth" in times of crisis. Thinldng of Fanon's critique of middle class anticolonial intellectual in The Wretched of the Earth and of Abahlali's insistence that their thinldng counts, the paper considers Fanon concept of political education rejecting the (...)
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  12. Paul Gifford (2012). The Vanguard of Colonialism: Missionaries and the Frontier in Southern Africa in the Nineteenth Century. Constellations 3 (2).
    In this essay, I undertake an examination of how Christian missionary societies facilitated the spread of European ideals and belief systems within an African community, and how this spread both prepared and weakened the African polities for increasing contact with colonial authorities. I specifically explore the role missionaries took in everyday functioning of African chiefdoms and kingdoms through their roles as interpreters and diplomats. Missionaries played a role in shaping the day-to-day existence of the polities in which they were based, (...)
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  13. Paul Gilroy (2012). Postcolonialism and Cosmopolitanism: Towards a Worldly Understanding of Fascism and Europe's Colonial Crimes. In Rosi Braidotti, Patrick Hanafin & Bolette Blaagaard (eds.), After Cosmopolitanism. Routledge. 111.
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  14. Don Habibi (1999). The Moral Dimensions of J. S. Mill's Colonialism. Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (1):125-146.
  15. Ratna Kapur (2010). Emancipatory Feminist Theory in Postcolonial India: Unmasking the Ruse of Liberal Internationalism. In Aakash Singh & Silika Mohapatra (eds.), Indian Political Thought: A Reader. Routledge.
  16. Edward Keene (2002). Beyond the Anarchical Society: Grotius, Colonialism and Order in World Politics. Cambridge University Press.
    It is commonly argued that the international system is currently in a state of upheaval, as state sovereignty is challenged by a variety of forces. Keene's book questions this assumption, arguing that sovereignty has never existed globally in any case, and suggesting that it has applied only to Western states. International relations elsewhere have been characterized by the norms of colonialism, rather than international law. The book examines the conduct of the British and Dutch empires, and how the traditions of (...)
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  17. A. Kiarina Kordela (1999). Political Metaphysics: God in Global Capitalism (the Slave, the Masters, Lacan, and the Surplus). Political Theory 27 (6):789-839.
    In truth, however, value is here the active factor in a process, in which, while constantly assuming the form in turn of money and commodities, it at the same time changes in magnitude, differentiates itself by throwing off surplus-value from itself; the original value, in other words, expands spontaneously. For the movement... is its own movement... is automatic expansion... able to add value to itself... living off-springs...golden eggs...an independent substance....It differentiates itself as original value from itself as surplus value; as (...)
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  18. Chandran Kukathas (2009). Postcolonialism and Political Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (3):363-365.
    Postcolonialism and Political Theory explores the intersection between the political and the postcolonial through an engagement with, critique of, and challenge to some of the prevalent, restrictive tenets and frameworks of Western political and social thought. It is a response to the call by postcolonial studies, as well as to the urgent need within world politics, to turn towards a multiplicity largely excluded from globally dominant discourses of community, subjectivity, power and prosperity constituted by otherness, radical alterity, or subordination to (...)
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  19. Ruth Lipschitz (2012). Skin/Ned Politics: Species Discourse and the Limits of “The Human” in Nandipha Mntambo's Art. Hypatia 27 (3):546-566.
    In this paper I focus on recent artworks by South African artist Nandipha Mntambo. I read these for the ways in which the discourse of species works within and against the humanist sacrificial economy of the subject that Jacques Derrida calls “carno-phallogocentric” (Derrida 1991). Drawing on Derrida's “metonymy of ‘eating well,'” Achille Mbembe's analysis of colonial violence, and Julia Kristeva's theory of abjection, I argue that these works inscribe and disturb a speciesist, sexual, and racial politics of animalization, and do (...)
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  20. Alice MacLachlan (forthcoming). Beyond the Ideal Political Apology. In Mihaela Mihai & Mathias Thaler (eds.), The Uses and Abuses of Apology. Palgrave MacMillan.
    As official apologies by political, corporate, and religious leaders becoming increasingly commonplace – offered in response to everything from personal wrongdoing to historical oppression and genocide – providing a plausible account of what such apologies can and cannot accomplish is of paramount importance. Yet reigning theories of apology typically conceive of them primarily as moral and not political phenomena, often modeling official apologies after interpersonal ones. This risks distorting the meaning and function of political apologies, while holding them to an (...)
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  21. S. Maffettone (2011). How to Avoid the Liaison Dangereuse Between Post-Colonialism and Postmodernism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (4):493-504.
    Post-colonial theories present narratives of discontent based on resentment toward colonial exploitation and cultural hegemony. The substance matter of post-colonial narratives (their first-order argument) is sound. Post-colonial theories often rely on a post-modern philosophical argumentative structure (their second-order argument). The second-order argument is not able to support the first-order argument. In particular, the nihilist consequences of post-modernism make impossible the construction of a (post-colonial) discourse through which the discontent is transformed in a basis for a reasonable political action. The lack (...)
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  22. Kudzai Matereke (2012). Rethinking Receptivity in a Postcolonial Context: Recasting Sembène'sMoolaade. Ethics and Global Politics 5 (3):pp. 153-170.
    The main challenge confronting African postcolonial societies is the failure of political, social, and cultural transformation to confront and transcend the limitations imposed by historical and contemporary contingencies. Hence the task of postcolonial theorists is to develop conceptual resources for a more sustained evaluation and analysis of the challenge. In this article, I recast Sembe`ne’s film, Moolaade, in a new relief to foreground the core issue of the postcolonial condition. I proceed to reappropriate Kompridis’s concepts of ‘reflective disclosure’ and ‘receptivity’, (...)
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  23. Walter Mignolo (2010). Cosmopolitanism and the De-Colonial Option. Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (2):111-127.
  24. Sidney Morgenbesser (1973). Imperialism: Some Preliminary Distinctions. Philosophy and Public Affairs 3 (1):3-44.
  25. Uma Narayan (1995). Colonialism and Its Others: Considerations on Rights and Care Discourses. Hypatia 10 (2):133 - 140.
    I point to a colonial care discourse that enabled colonizers to define themselves in relationship to "inferior" colonized subjects. The colonized, however, had very different accounts of this relationship. While contemporary care discourse correctly insists on acknowledging human needs and relationships, it needs to worry about who defines these often contested terms. I conclude that improvements along dimensions of care and of justice often provide "enabling conditions" for each other.
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  26. Robert Lee Nichols (2005). Realizing the Social Contract: The Case of Colonialism and Indigenous Peoples. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (1):42.
  27. Jennifer Pitts (2003). Legislator of the World? A Rereading of Bentham on Colonies. Political Theory 31 (2):200-234.
    It has become almost commonplace to claim that utilitarianism was, from its inception, an imperialist theory. Many writers, from Bentham's own followers to recent scholars, have suggested that from Bentham onward, utilitarians reveled in the opportunity that they believed despotic power provided for the establishment of perfectly rational laws and institutions. A closer look at Bentham's own views on empire, however, reveals a sharp break between his position on European colonies and that of followers such as James and John Stuart (...)
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  28. J. M. Pullen (1994). Malthus on Colonization and Economic Development: A Comparison with Adam Smith. Utilitas 6 (02):243-.
  29. Louise Racine (2009). Applying Antonio Gramsci's Philosophy to Postcolonial Feminist Social and Political Activism in Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 10 (3):180-190.
    Through its social and political activism goals, postcolonial feminist theoretical approaches not only focus on individual issues that affect health but encompass the examination of the complex interplay between neocolonialism, neoliberalism, and globalization, in mediating the health of non-Western immigrants and refugees. Postcolonial feminism holds the promise to influence nursing research and practice in the 21st century where health remains a goal to achieve and a commitment for humanity. This is especially relevant for nurses, who act as global citizens and (...)
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  30. Helene Bowen Raddeker (2007). Sceptical History: Feminist and Postmodern Approaches in Practice. Routledge.
    A highly original work in history and theory, this survey considers major themes including identity, class and sexual difference, weaves them into debates on the nature and point of history, and arrives at new ways of doing history that – very unusually – consider non-Western history and feminist approaches. Using wide range of historical and cultural contexts, the study draws extensively on feminist scholarship, both feminist history and postcolonial feminism.
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  31. Sangeeta Ray (1992). Review: Shifting Subjects Shifting Ground: The Names and Spaces of the Post-Colonial. [REVIEW] Hypatia 7 (2):188 - 201.
    This essay participates in a feminist postcolonial critical historiography/epistemology by providing a critique of The Post-Colonial Critic: Interviews, Strategies, Dialogues. The essay considers Spivak's success in interrogating her own position as a leading postcolonial critic as she engages in dialogues with various people. Spivak's commitment to cross-cultural exchanges is undeniable. However, at times the resurgence of her authoritative subject position deflects productive tensions generated by careful scrutiny of the category postcolonial.
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  32. Andrew Robinson (2009). Postcolonialism and Political Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (3):363.
  33. Andrea Smith (2003). Not an Indian Tradition: The Sexual Colonization of Native Peoples. Hypatia 18 (2):70-85.
    : This paper analyzes the connections between sexual violence and colonialism in the lives and histories of Native peoples in the United States. This paper argues that sexual violence does not simply just occur within the process of colonialism, but that colonialism is itself structured by the logic of sexual violence. Furthermore, this logic of sexual violence continues to structure U. S. policies toward Native peoples today. Consequently, anti-sexual violence and anti-colonial struggles cannot be separated.
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  34. Kok-Chor Tan (2007). Colonialism, Reparations, and Global Justice. In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press. 280--306.
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  35. Craig Yirush (2012). The Idea of Rights in the Imperial Crisis. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (2):82-103.
    This essay examines the idea of rights advanced by the American colonists in the imperial crisis (1763-1776). It argues that the colonists viewed all English subjects as having the same fundamental rights as individuals everywhere in the empire. These individual rights (to life, liberty, and property) were in turn guaranteed by the right to consent to taxation. In the empire, the colonists insisted, these rights could only be protected by the colonial legislatures as they were not represented in the British (...)
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  36. Antonina Łuszczykiewicz (2012). Kulturowe stereotypy i uprzedzenia wobec Indusów w twórczości Rudyarda Kiplinga. ARGUMENT 2 (1):199-221.
    English title: Cultural Stereotypes and Bias Towards the Indians in Writing of Rudyard Kipling. The aim of this paper is to characterize and dispute the cultural stereotypes and prejudices against the Indians depicted in the writings of Rudyard Kipling (1865–1936), one of the most popular British novelists of the Victorian era. The starting point for these reflections is George Orwell’s essay in which he describes Kipling as a racist and imperialist as well as a morally insensitive and aesthetically disgusting figure. (...)
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Cosmopolitanism
  1. Siep Stuurman (2007). Cosmopolitan Egalitarianism in the Enlightenment: Anquetil Duperron on India and America. Journal of the History of Ideas 68 (2):255-278.
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  2. Kok-Chor Tan (2012). Justice, Institutions, and Luck: The Site, Ground, and Scope of Equality. OUP Oxford.
    Kok-Chor Tan addresses three key questions in egalitarian distributive justice: Where does distributive equality matter?; Why does it matter?; And among whom does it matter? He argues for an institutional site for egalitarian justice, and suggests that the mitigation of arbitrariness or luck is the basis for distributive commitments. He also argues that distributive obligations are global in scope, applying between individuals across borders. Tan's objectives are tripartite: to clarify the basis of an institutional approach to justice; to establish luck (...)
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  3. Yusuf Yuksekdag (2012). Moral Cosmopolitanism and the Right to Immigration. Public Reason 4 (1-2):262-272.
    This study is devoted to the ways and means to justify a ‘more’ cosmopolitan realization of certain policy implications, in the case of immigration. The raison d’être of this study is the idea that the contemporary debate over open borders suffers from indeterminate discussions on whether liberal states are entitled to restrict immigration. On the other hand, most of the liberal cosmopolitan accounts neglect the detrimental consequences of their open borders argument – which take it as a means to compensate (...)
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Cultural Cosmopolitanism
  1. Mitchell Aboulafia (2001). The Cosmopolitan Self: George Herbert Mead and Continental Philosophy. Illinois University Press.
    This important volume appreciably advances the dialogue between continental thought and classical American philosophy.
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  2. Craig Calhoun (2010). A Cosmopolitanism of Connections. In Hilary Ballon (ed.), The Cosmopolitan Idea. Nyu Abu Dhabi.
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  3. Yvonne Chiu & Robert S. Taylor (2011). The Self-Extinguishing Despot: Millian Democratization, or The Autophagous Autocrat. Journal of Politics 73 (4):1239-50.
    Although there is no more iconic, stalwart, and eloquent defender of liberty and representative democracy than J.S. Mill, he sometimes endorses non-democratic forms of governance. This article explains the reasons behind this seeming aberration and shows that Mill actually has complex and nuanced views of the transition from non-democratic to democratic government, including the comprehensive and parallel material, cultural, institutional, and character reforms that must occur, and the mechanism by which they will be enacted. Namely, an enlightened despot must cultivate (...)
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  4. Simon Cushing, Reaching for My Gun: Why We Shouldn't Hear the Word "Culture" in Normative Political Theory. 1st Global Conference: Multiculturalism, Conflict and Belonging.
    Culture is a notoriously elusive concept. This fact has done nothing to hinder its popularity in contemporary analytic political philosophy among writers like John Rawls, Will Kymlicka, Michael Walzer, David Miller, Iris Marion Young, Joseph Raz, Avishai Margalit and Bikhu Parekh, among many others. However, this should stop, both for the metaphysical reason that the concept of culture, like that of race, is itself either incoherent or lacking a referent in reality, and for several normative reasons. I focus on the (...)
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