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  1. William Bain (2009). The English School and the Activity of Being an Historian. In Cornelia Navari (ed.), Theorising International Society: English School Methods. Palgrave Macmillan.
  2. J. Samuel Barkin (2006). International Organization: Theories and Institutions. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Primarily focused on the theoretical aspects of International Organization, this book provides an in-depth examination of competing theories through thematic chapters. Intended to fill the gap between introductory textbooks and primary sources of theory, International Organization , is useful for upper-level international relations courses with a significant emphasis on theory.
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  3. Krzysztof Brzechczyn (1993). Unsuccessful Conquest and Successful Subordination. A Contribution to the Theory of Intersocial Relations. Poznań Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 33:445-456.
    The aim of this paper is to extend the Leszek Nowak's theory of socialist empire by introducing weaker forms of intersocial relation, e. gr. unsuccessful attempt at conquest and subordination. In the light of concretization of the model of socialist empire some facts from history of Soviet Union (intervention of the Entente and World War II) and socialist countries (autonomy of Albania and Romania in socialist bloc) are explained.
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  4. Scott Burchill (ed.) (2005). Theories of International Relations. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The fully updated and revised third edition of this widely used text provides a comprehensive survey of leading perspectives in the field including an entirely new chapter on Realism by Jack Donnelly. The introduction explains the nature of theory and the reasons for studying international relations in a theoretically informed way. The nine chapters which follow--written by leading scholars in the US, the UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand--provide thorough examinations of each of the major approaches currently prevailing in the (...)
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  5. Rory J. Conces (2009). Rethinking Realism (or Whatever) and the War on Terrorism in a Place Like the Balkans. Theoria 56 (120):81-124.
    Political realism remains a powerful theoretical framework for thinking about international relations, including the war on terrorism. For Morgenthau and other realists, foreign policy is a matter of national interest defined in terms of power. Some writers view this tenet as weakening, if not severing, realism's link with morality. I take up the contrary view that morality is embedded in realist thought, as well as the possibility of realism being thinly and thickly moralised depending on the moral psychology of the (...)
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  6. Benjamin Frankel (ed.) (1996). Realism: Restatements and Renewal. F. Cass.
    The original essays collected in this book offer a comprehensive evaluation of realism as a theory of international relations. Realism has been the subject of critical scrutiny for some time and this examination aims to identify and define its strengths and shortcomings. In the realist family there has been a flourishing of variants and interpretations, a fact that many critics of realism tend to obscure or dismiss. In the past decade and a half we have seen the emergence of neo-realism, (...)
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  7. K. J. Holsti (2009). Theorising the Causes of Order : Hedley Bull's The Anarchical Society. In Cornelia Navari (ed.), Theorising International Society: English School Methods. Palgrave Macmillan. 125--47.
  8. Andrew Hurrell (2007). On Global Order: Power, Values, and the Constitution of International Society. Oxford University Press.
    Drawing on work in International Relations, International Law and Global Governance, this book aims to provide a clear and wide-ranging introduction to the ...
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  9. Nik Hynek & Andrea Teti (2010). Saving Identity From Postmodernism&Quest; The Normalization of Constructivism in International Relations. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (2):171-199.
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  10. Beate Jahn (ed.) (2006). Classical Theory in International Relations. Cambridge University Press.
    Classical political theorists such as Thucydides, Kant, Rousseau, Smith, Hegel, Grotius, Mill, Locke and Clausewitz are often employed to explain and justify contemporary international politics and are seen to constitute the different schools of thought in the discipline. However, traditional interpretations frequently ignore the intellectual and historical context in which these thinkers were writing as well as the lineages through which they came to be appropriated in International Relations. This collection of essays provides alternative interpretations sensitive to these political and (...)
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  11. Edward Keene (2009). International Society as an Ideal Type. In Cornelia Navari (ed.), Theorising International Society: English School Methods. Palgrave Macmillan. 104--124.
  12. Andrew Linklater (ed.) (2000). International Relations: Critical Concepts in Political Science. Routledge.
    Reprinting more than 80 essential papers published in the 20th century, this set is the most comprehensive collection to appear to date. The papers include "classics" in the field as well as ones placing International Relations in a wider context, from the late 1940s to the present day. An invaluable resource for all students of this field.
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  13. Richard Little (2009). History, Theory and Methodological Pluralism in the English School. In Cornelia Navari (ed.), Theorising International Society: English School Methods. Palgrave Macmillan.
  14. Mark Rigstad, The 'Bush Doctrine' as a Hegemonic Discourse Strategy. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy.
    Even if preventive military counter-terrorism may sometimes be ethically justifiable, it remains an open question whether the Bush Doctrine presents a discursively coherent account of the relevant normative conditions. With a view towards answering this question, this article critically examines efforts to ground the morally personifying language of the Bush Doctrine in term of hegemonic stability theory. Particular critical attention is paid to the arguments of leading proponents of this brand of game theory, including J. Yoo, E. Posner, A. Sykes, (...)
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  15. Edward Song (2010). Subjectivist Cosmopolitanism and the Morality of Intervention. Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (2):137-151.
    While cosmopolitans are right to think that state sovereignty is derived from individuals, many cosmopolitan accounts can be too demanding in their expectations for illiberal regimes because they do not account for the attitudes of the persons with who will subject to the intervention. These ‘objectivist’ accounts suggest that sovereignty is wholly a matter of a state’s conformity to the objective demands of justice. In contrast, for ‘subjectivist’ accounts, the attitudes of citizens do matter. Subjectivist cosmopolitans do not deny the (...)
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  16. Mathias Thaler (2010). The Illusion of Purity: Chantal Mouffe's Realist Critique of Cosmopolitanism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (7):785-800.
    Over the last 20 years, cosmopolitan theories have been benefiting greatly from the dialogue between defenders and critics of world citizenship. Yet, the decidedly polemic aspect of this debate, while allowing for intellectual progress, is also responsible for overdrawn generalizations. Instead of entering into the debate directly, this article attempts to refute a specific anti-cosmopolitan claim raised by Chantal Mouffe. Her realist objection to cosmopolitanism, derived from the conceptual framework of agonistic pluralism, is mistaken at a crucial point: a firm (...)
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