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  1. Jay Allman (2001). Metaphor and Davidson's Theory of Interpretation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (1):1-22.
  2. Maria Alvarez (1994). Radical Interpretation and Semantic Nihilism: Reply to Glock. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (176):354-360.
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  3. Lynne Rudder Baker (2005). Interpretation in Action: A Preliminary Inquiry. In Fernando Mão de Ferro (ed.), A Explicação da Interpretação Humana (Portuguese). Edições Colibri.
    The term ‘human interpretation’ itself has two interpretations: interpretation by human beings and interpretation of human beings. We are all familiar with both kinds of interpretation in ordinary life. Marie interprets Sam’s remark as a sexual invitation; Joseph interprets the famous guest’s attire as an insult to the host. But as the organizers of our conference point out, we have no systematic explanation of human interpretation—either ‘of’ or ‘by’ human beings. Before embarking on a theory of human interpretation, however, we (...)
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  4. Anthony D. Baldino, Incommensurability and Interpretation.
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  5. Gilead Bar-Elli, Interpretation: Keeping in Touch with Reality.
    I doubt whether these three theses, which characterize basic features of Davidson's conception of meaning, are coherent. The narrow sense of (1) has (2) as an obvious corollary. The wider sense of (1), or some aspects of it, is partly explicated by (3). But this doesn’t seem to cohere with (2). When theory of meaning is taken in the wider sense to include an account of how one could come to know that such a theory of truth was true (for (...)
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  6. Rita Sloan Berndt (2000). Sentence Comprehension in Broca's Aphasia: A Critique of the Evidence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):24-24.
    The argument that Broca's area is preferentially involved in specific syntactic operations is based on a strong assertion regarding patterns of sentence comprehension found among patients with Broca's aphasia. This assertion is shown to be largely inconsistent with the available evidence from published studies, which indicates that only a subgroup of Broca patients demonstrate the target pattern.
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  7. Christian Beyer (2006). Mentale Simulation Und Radikale Interpretation. Grazer Philosophische Studien 70 (1):25-45.
    The notion of empathy has more recently seen a considerable revival—notably (first) in connection with Quine's empathy model of radical interpretation, in contrast to which Davidson has developed his triangulation model, and (secondly) in the context of the debate between simulation theory vs. theory theory about propositional attitude ascription. So far, these debates have been carried on fairly independently of each other. This paper is an attempt to utilize the interpretation-theoretical discussion in order to argue for a moderate version of (...)
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  8. John Biro (1981). Meaning, Translation and Interpretation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 59 (3):267 – 282.
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  9. Ingar Brink (2004). Joint Attention, Triangulation and Radical Interpretation: A Problem and its Solution. Dialectica 58 (2):179–206.
    By describing the aim of triangulation as locating the object of thoughts and utterances, Davidson has given it the double role of accounting for both the individuation of content and the sense in which content necessarily is public. The focus of this article is on how triangulation may contribute to the individuation of content. I maintain that triangulation may serve to break into the intentional circle of meaning and belief, yet without forcing us to renounce the claims concerning the interdependence (...)
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  10. Jeffrey Buechner (1987). Radically Misinterpreting Radical Interpretation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (4):409-410.
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  11. H. G. Callaway (1986). Beardsley on Metaphor. Restant 14, Text, Literature and Aesthetics 14:73-88.
    Monroe C. Beardsley has made seminal contributions to the on-going discussions of metaphor, contributions of continuing relevance and influence. His "Verbal Opposition Theory," like Max Black's "Interaction Theory," is a classic document of the contemporary semantic approach to metaphor, and has placed special emphasis upon the recognition of metaphor --the problem of the metaphorical warrant--which has lead to a deeper understanding of the complexities of this problem.
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  12. Jack S. Crumley (1989). Talking Lions and Lion Talk: Davidson on Conceptual Schemes. Synthese 80 (3):347-371.
    This essay is a reconstruction and defense of Davidson''s argument against the intelligiblity of the notion of conceptual scheme. After presenting a brief clarification of Davidson''s argument in On the Very Idea of a Conceptual Scheme, I turn to reconstructing Davidson''s argument. Unlike many commentators, and occasionally Davidson, who hold that the motive force of the argument is the Principle of Charity (or the denial of the Third Dogma), I argue that there is a further principle which underlies the argument. (...)
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  13. Giuseppina D'Oro (2004). Re-Enactment and Radical Interpretation. History and Theory 43 (2):198–208.
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  14. Donald Davidson (1993). Reply to Eva Picardi's First-Person Authority and Radical Interpretation. In Ralf Stoecker (ed.), Reflecting Davidson: Donald Davidson Responding to an International Forum of Philosophers (Foundations of Communication). Hawthorne: De Gruyter.
  15. Fernando Mão de Ferro (ed.) (2005). A Explicação da Interpretação Humana (Portuguese). Edições Colibri.
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  16. Catherine Z. Elgin (2000). Interpretation and Understanding. Erkenntnis 52 (2):175-183.
    To understand a term or other symbol, I argue that it is generally neither necessary nor sufficient to assign it a unique determinate reference. Independent of and prior to investigation, it is frequently indeterminate not only whether a sentence is true, but also what its truth conditions are. Nelson Goodman's discussions of likeness of meaning are deployed to explain how this can be so.
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  17. Tim Fernando, Three Processes in Natural Language Interpretation.
    To address complications involving ambiguity, presupposition and implicature, three processes underlying natural language interpretation are isolated: translation, entailment and attunement. A meta-language integrating these processes is outlined, elaborating on a proof-theoretic approach to presupposition.
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  18. Christopher G. Framarin (2005). Taking Desirelessness () Seriously. Asian Philosophy 15 (2):143 – 155.
    There is a principle of charity within the Indian philosophical tradition that states that one is justified in reverting to a non-literal interpretation of a text only when a literal reading entails a clear contradiction. Most scholars have argued that a literal interpretation of the Bhagavadgtā's advice to act without desire ought to be abandoned for this reason, because it contradicts the obvious fact that desire is a necessary condition of action. In this paper two often cited arguments for the (...)
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  19. Raymond W. Gibbs Jr (1993). The Intentionalist Controversy and Cognitive Science. Philosophical Psychology 6 (2):181 – 205.
    What role do speakers'/authors' communicative intentions play in language interpretation? Cognitive scientists generally assume that listeners'/readers' recognitions of speakers'/authors' intentions is a crucial aspect of utterance interpretation. Various philosophers, literary theorists and anthropologists criticize this intentional view and assert that speakers'/authors' intentions do not provide either the starting point for linguistic interpretation or constrain how texts should be understood. Until now, cognitive scientists have not seriously responded to the current challenges regarding intentions in communication. My purpose in this article is (...)
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  20. Mauro Giuffrè (2012). Theognis of Megara and the Divine Creating Power in the Framework of Semiotic Textology: An Application of János Sándor Petöfi's Theory to Archaic Greek Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 21 (3):325-346.
    This paper is a demonstration of an application of Semiotic Textology to a limited case study. The main aspects of Semiotic Textology, the theory elaborated by Petöfi, are presented; secondly the linguistic aspects of the interpretation of lines 133–134 of the Theognis of Megara’s poem, analysed in the framework of said theory, are presented. All the relevant syntactic, semantic, pragmatic information involved in text processing have been considered. Through fixed steps, it is shown that text processing is not exclusively a (...)
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  21. Hans-Johann Glock (1995). A Radical Interpretation of Davidson: Reply to Alvarez. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (179):206-212.
    The paper is a reply to the accusation ("Philosophical Quarterly", 44, 1994) that my The Indispensability of Translation' ("Philosophical Quartrely", 43, 1993) misrepresents Davidson's account of radical interpretation. It defends my claim that Davidson assimilates everyday understanding to the interpretation of an alien language, and discusses the ways in which he identifies interpretation with translation. I admit that Davidson has recently acknowledged first person authority concerning speaker's meaning, but show that this is a change of his views. Davidson's position is (...)
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  22. S. C. Goldberg (2004). Radical Interpretation, Understanding, and the Testimonial Transmission of Knowledge. Synthese 138 (3):387 - 416.
    In this paper I argue that RadicalInterpretation (RI), taken to be a methodological doctrine regarding the conditions under which an interpretation of an utterance is both warranted and correct, has unacceptable implications for the conditions on (ascriptions of) understanding. The notion of understanding at play is that which underwrites the testimonial transmission of knowledge. After developing this notion I argue that, on the assumption of RI, hearers will fail to have such understanding in situations in which we should want to (...)
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  23. Serge Grigoriev (2009). Beyond Radical Interpretation: Individuality as the Basis of Historical Understanding. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (4):489-503.
    Owing in part to Rorty’s energetic promotional efforts, Davidson’s philosophy of language has received much attention in recent decades from quarters most diverse, creating at times a sense of an almost protean versatility. Conspicuously missing from the rapidly growing literature on the subject is a sustained discussion of the relationship between Davidson’s interpretive theory and history: an omission all the more surprising since a comparison between Davidson and Gadamer has been pursued at some length and now, it seems,abandoned—all without as (...)
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  24. John Haglund & Johan Blomberg (2010). The Meaning-Sharing Network. Hortues Semioticus 6:17-30.
    We advocate an analysis of meaning that departs from the pragmatic slogan that “meaning is use”. However, in order to avoid common missteps, this claim is in dire need of qualification. We argue that linguistic meaning does not originate from language use as such; therefore we cannot base a theory of meaning only on use. It is important not to neglect the fact that language is ultimately reliant on non-linguistic factors. This might seem to oppose the aforementioned slogan, but it (...)
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  25. David K. Henderson (1990). An Empirical Basis for Charity in Interpretation. Erkenntnis 32 (1):83 - 103.
    In codifying the methods of translation, several writers have formulated maxims that would constrain interpreters to construe their subjects as (more or less) rational speakers of the truth. Such maxims have come to be known as versions of the principle of charity. W. V. O. Quine suggests an empirical, not purely methodological, basis for his version of that principle. Recently, Stephen Stich has criticized Quine's attempt to found the principle of charity in translation on information about the probabilities of various (...)
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  26. Edward L. Keenan (1983). Facing the Truth: Some Advantages of Direct Interpretation. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 6 (3):335 - 371.
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  27. Gary Kemp (2001). Samesaying, Propositions and Radical Interpretation. Ratio 14 (2):131–152.
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  28. Robert Kirk (1993). Indeterminacy of Interpretation, Idealization, and Norms. Philosophical Studies 70 (2):213-223.
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  29. Herman H. J. Kolk & Robert J. Hartsuiker (2000). Agrammatic Sentence Processing: Severity, Complexity, and Priming. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):39-40.
    Grodzinsky's theory of agrammatic sentence processing fails to account for crucial empirical facts. In contrast to his predictions, the data show that there are (1) degrees of severity and (2) problems with sentences that do not require movement, and that (3) under the right task circumstances, full-fledged syntactic trees are constructed.
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  30. Petr Kotatko (2000). Mutual Beliefs and Communicative Success. Theoria 15 (3):421-433.
    The paper explores the notion of communicative success as a match between the speaker's communicative intention and the audience's interpretation. The first part argues that it cannot be generalized to all kinds of communication. The second part characterizes various types of relations between the speaker's and the audience's beliefs on which this kind of communicative success can be based. It shows that the requirements concerning agreement between these beliefs are rather modest.
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  31. Richard K. Larson & Peter Ludlow (1993). Interpreted Logical Forms. Synthese 95 (3):305 - 355.
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  32. Daniel Laurier (2008). Review of Maria Cristina Amoretti, Nicla Vassallo (Eds.), Knowledge, Language, and Interpretation: On the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (11).
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  33. Thomas J. Liu, Limited Unconscious Process of Meaning.
    In two experiments, subjects’ task was to decide whether a binocularly viewed target word was evaluatively good (e.g., fame, comedy, rescue) or bad (e.g., stress, detest, malaria) in meaning. Just prior to this target word, a priming word was presented to the nondominant eye, and masked by an immediately following presentation of a letter—fragment pattern to the dominant eye. (Masking effectiveness was demonstrated by subjects’ failure to discriminate the left vs. right position of a test series of words.) In Experiment (...)
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  34. Peter Ludlow (2000). Interpreted Logical Forms, Belief Attribution, and the Dynamic Lexicon. In K. Jaczszolt (ed.), The Pragmatics of Propositional Attitudes. Elsevier.
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  35. Kirk Ludwig, Meaning, Truth and Interpretation.
    We owe to Donald Davidson the suggestion that a truth theory used as an interpretation theory for a speaker can do duty as a meaning theory for his language. This is a brilliant suggestion, but there are some oddities in the development of this idea in Davidson’s work which need to be brought to light, and the project, in the form it takes in Davidson’s hands, in the end is too ambitious to succeed. I begin by distinguishing three questions: 1.What (...)
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  36. Josep Macià (2000). On the Interpretation of Formal Languages and the Analysis of Logical Properties. Theoria 15 (2):235-258.
    We can distinguish different senses in which a formal language can be said to have been provided with an interpretation. We focus on two: (i) We provide a model (or structure) and a definition of satisfaction and truth in the standard way (ii) We provide a translation into a natural language. We argue that the sentences of a formal language interpreted as in (i) do not have meaning. A formal language interpreted as in (i) models the way the truth of (...)
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  37. J. Malpas (ed.) (forthcoming). The Hermeneutic Davidson. MIT Press.
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  38. David D. McDonald (1994). 'Krisp': A Represnetation for the Semantic Interpretation of Texts. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 4 (1):59-73.
    KRISP is a representation system and set of interpretation protocols that is used in the Sparser natural language understanding system to embody the meaning of texts and their pragmatic contexts. It is based on a denotational notion of semantic interpretation, where the phrases of a text are directly projected onto a largely pre-existing set of individuals and categories in a model, rather than first going through a level of symbolic representation such as a logical form. It defines a small set (...)
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  39. Colin McGinn (1977). Charity, Interpretation, and Belief. Journal of Philosophy 74 (9):521-535.
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  40. Peter Pagin (2006). The Status of Charity II: Charity, Probability, and Simplicity. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (3):361 – 383.
    Treating the principle of charity as a non-empirical, foundational principle leads to insoluble problems of justification. I suggest instead treating semantic properties realistically, and semantic terms as theoretical terms. This allows us to apply ordinary scientific reasoning in meta-semantics. In particular, we can appeal to widespread verbal agreement as an empirical phenomenon, and we can make use of probabilistic reasoning as well as appeal to theoretical simplicity for reaching the conclusion that there is a high rate of agreement in belief (...)
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  41. Prashant Parikh (2000). Communication, Meaning, and Interpretation. Linguistics and Philosophy 23 (2):185-212.
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  42. Eva Picardi (1993). First-Person Authority and Radical Interpretation. In Ralf Stoecker (ed.), Reflecting Davidson: Donald Davidson Responding to an International Forum of Philosophers (Foundations of Communication). Hawthorne: De Gruyter.
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  43. Stefano Predelli (1998). Utterance, Interpretation and the Logic of Indexicals. Mind and Language 13 (3):400–414.
  44. Gerhard Preyer (2000). Primary Reasons: From Radical Interpretation to a Pure Anomalism of the Mental. Protosociology 14:158-179.
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  45. Scott Soames (2008). Truth and Meaning: In Perspective. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 32 (1):1-19.
    My topic is the attempt by Donald Davidson, and those inspired by him, to explain knowledge of meaning in terms of knowledge of truth conditions. For Davidsonians, these attempts take the form of rationales for treating theories of truth, constructed along Tarskian lines, as empirical theories of meaning. In earlier work1, I argued that Davidson’s two main rationales – one presented in “Truth and Meaning”2 and “Radical Interpretation,”3 and the other in his “Reply to Foster”4 – were unsuccessful. Here, (...)
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  46. Anfinn Stigen (1960). What Does Mr. Tennessen Mean, and What Should I Say? Inquiry 3 (1-4):180 – 184.
    Referring to Professor Tennessen's article “What Should We Say?”; (Inquiry, vol. 2 (1959), pp. 265-90), Mr. Stigen argues that Tennessen fails to distinguish between the speech situation of the speaker and that of the interpreter. He therefore, according to Stigen, confuses the problems relevant to each of them and frequently treats problems of “What should I say?”; with considerations relevant only to interpreters, whose proper question is “What does he mean?”;, and vice versa. Among other mistakes, according to Stigen, this (...)
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  47. Ralf Stoecker (ed.) (1993). Reflecting Davidson: Donald Davidson Responding to an International Forum of Philosophers. W. De Gruyter.
    Truth, Meaning and Logical Form Reflections on Davidson's Philosophy of Language WOLFGANG KUNNE I. Introduction: Davidson and Tarski The governing idea of ...
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  48. Hamid Vahid (2008). Radical Interpretation and Moore's Paradox. Theoria 74 (2):146-163.
    Abstract: Moore's sentences of the form "P & ∼I believe that P" and "P & I believe that ∼P" are thought to be paradoxical because they cannot be properly asserted despite being possibly true. Solutions to the paradox usually explain the oddity of such sentences in terms of phenomena as diverse as the pragmatics of speech acts, nature of belief or justification. In this paper I shall argue that despite their seemingly different approaches to the problem, there is a single (...)
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  49. Frank Veltman, Coreference and Modality in the Context of Multi-Speaker Discourse.
    Update semantics1 embodies a radical view on the relation between context and interpretation. The meaning of a sentence is identified with its context change potential, where contexts are identified with information states. The recursive definition of semantic interpretation is stated in terms of a process of updating an information state with a sentence. Meanings of sentences, then, are update functions. In general, these are partial functions, since the possibility to update with a sentence may depend on the fulfillment of certain (...)
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  50. Marcus Verhaegh (2001). Hypothetical and Psychoanalytic Interpretation. Journal of Philosophical Research 26:295-305.
    I develop the concept of hypothetical interpretation to give an account of certain problematic interpretive practices within a broadly Gricean framework. These practices attempt to find neither speaker nor linguistic meaning but rather, seek to discover such things as the unconscious beliefs of a text’s producer. In developing the concept of hypothetical interpretation, I consider in particular the question of their plausibility. I show how the plausibility of a hypothetical interpretation can be taken as providing evidence about a speaker’s noncommunicative (...)
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