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  1. Norma Alarcón (1991). The Theoretical Subjects of 'This Bridge Called My Back and Anglo-American Feminism'. In Hector Calderón José David Saldiva (ed.), Criticism in the Borderlands. Studies in Chicano Literature, Culture and Ideology. Duke University Press
    This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color, edited by Chicana writers Cherríe Moraga and Gloria Anzaldúa, was intended as a collection of essays, poems, tales and testimonials that would give voice to the contradictory experiences of “women of color.” In fact, the editors state: -/- We are the colored in a white feminist movement. We are the feminists among the people of our culture. We are often the lesbians among the straight. -/- By giving voice to (...)
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  2. Linda Martin Alcoff, On Prejudging the Duke Lacrosse Team Scandal.
    First, we should separate out the two distinct realms of discourse that are operative in this scandal: the formal legal one, from the informal public one. Each realm has different standards of judgment, and plays a different role. The formal, legal realm is organized to determine the legal guilt of innocence of the individuals accused, while it should be clear that the public realm—that diffuse and loose amalgam of both formal and informal communications—cannot determine individual legal guilt or innocence. First, (...)
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  3. Linda Martin Alcoff, The Problem of Speaking for Others.
    This was published in Cultural Critique (Winter 1991-92), pp. 5-32; revised and reprinted in Who Can Speak? Authority and Critical Identity edited by Judith Roof and Robyn Wiegman, University of Illinois Press, 1996; and in Feminist Nightmares: Women at Odds edited by Susan Weisser and Jennifer Fleischner, (New York: New York University Press, 1994); and also in Racism and Sexism: Differences and Connections eds. David Blumenfeld and Linda Bell, Rowman and Littlefield, 1995.
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  4. Linda Martín Alcoff (2008). Surviving Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality by Jorge J. E. Gracia; Mapping the Boundaries of Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality. International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (2):231-238.
  5. Linda Martín Alcoff (2003). Latino/as, Asian Americans, and the Black–White Binary. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):5-27.
    This paper aims to contribute toward coalitionbuilding by showing that, even if we try tobuild coalition around what might look like ourmost obvious common concern – reducing racism –the dominant discourse of racial politics inthe United States inhibits an understanding ofhow racism operates vis-à-vis Latino/as andAsian Americans, and thus proves more of anobstacle to coalition building than an aid. Theblack/white paradigm, which operates to governracial classifications and racial politics inthe U.S., takes race in the U.S. to consist ofonly two racial (...)
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  6. Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.) (2007). The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
  7. Natalie Alexander (1992). Review: Piecings From a Second Reader. [REVIEW] Hypatia 7 (2):177 - 187.
    A new collection of critical essays from bell hooks takes as its theme the deep longing for a critical voice. I explore some motifs that operate across the divergent topics of her essays. She writes of the dangers of commodification, of "reassuring" images, of individualism. I also explore the paths of hooks's uniquely black postmodernism: her critique of various essentialisms, her philosophically important conception of subjectivity, and her beautiful and powerful transformations of multiple discourses.
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  8. Floya Anthias & Pilar Rodríguez Martínez (eds.) (2006). Feminismos Periféricos: Discutiendo Las Categorías Sexo, Clase y Raza (y Etnicidad) Con Floya Anthias. Alhulia.
  9. Gloria Anzaldúa (1987). Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. Aunt Lute.
    Borderlands/La Frontera deals with the psychology of resistance to oppression. The possibility of resistance is revealed by perceiving the self in the process of being oppressed as another face of the self in the process of resisting oppression. The new mestiza consciousness is born from this interplay between oppression and resistance. Resistance is understood as social, collective activity, by adding to Anzaldúa's theory the distinction between the act and the process of resistance.
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  10. Gloria Anzaldúa & Cherrie Moraga (eds.) (1984/2002). This Bridge Called My Back: Radical Writings by Women of Color. Kitchen Table Women of Color Press.
    This Bridge Called My Back - writings by radical women of color, is an anthology that two decades ago, called for 'a radical restructuring of this country' [ie the United States of America]. On the afternoon of September 11, 2001, Cherríe Moraga began her task of composing the foreword to the book's third edition. The bombing of America's World Trade Centre reminded her of the extent to which invasion and terrorism have, for five centuries, been a part life for Third (...)
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  11. Anthony Appiah (1990). "But Would That Still Be Me?" Notes on Gender, "Race," Ethnicity, as Sources of "Identity". Journal of Philosophy 87 (10):493-499.
  12. Yoko Arisaka, Asian Women: Invisibility, Locations, and Claims to Philosophy.
    “Asian women” is an ambiguous category; it seems to indicate a racial as well as a cultural designation. The number of articles or books on being Asian or Asian-American is on the rise in other disciplines, but in comparison to the material on black or Hispanic identities, Asians are largely missing from the field of philosophy of race. Things Asian in philosophy are generally reserved for those who study Asian philosophy or comparative philosophy, but that focus usually excludes reflections on (...)
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  13. Alison Bailey (2010). On Intersectionality and the Whiteness of Feminist Philosophy. In George Yancy (ed.), THE CENTER MUST NOT HOLD: WHITE WOMEN PHILOSOPHERS ON THE WHITENESS OF PHILOSOPHY. Lexington Books
    In this paper I explore some possible reasons why white feminists philosophers have failed to engage the radical work being done by non-Western women, U.S. women of color and scholars of color outside of the discipline. -/- Feminism and academic philosophy have had lots to say to one another. Yet part of what marks feminist philosophy as philosophy is our engagement with the intellectual traditions of the white forefathers. I’m not uncomfortable with these projects: Aristotle, Foucault, Sartre, Wittgenstein, Quine, Austin, (...)
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  14. Alison Bailey (2009). On Intersectionality, Empathy, And Feminist Solidarity: A Reply To Naomi Zack. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 19 (1):14-36.
    Naomi Zack’s Inclusive Feminism: A Third Wave Theory of Women’s Commonality begins with an original reading of the paradigm shift from gender essentialism to intersectionality that ended U.S. second wave feminism. According to Zack there has been a crisis in academic and professional feminism since the late 1970s. Her project is to explain the motivation behind the shift from commonality to intersectionality, to outline its harmful effects, and to reclaim the idea that all women share something in common . To (...)
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  15. Alison Bailey (2008). On Intersectionality, Empathy, and Feminist Solidarity. Peace and Justice Studies 18 (2):14-36.
    Naomi Zack's Inclusive Feminism: A Third Wave Theory of Women's Commonality (2005) begins with an original reading of the paradigm shift that ended U.S. second wave feminism. According to Zack there has been a crisis in academic and professional feminism since the late 1970s. It grew out of the anxieties about essentialism in the wake of white feminist's realization that our understandings of "sisterhood" and "women" excluded women of color and poor women. This realization eventually lead to the movement's foundational (...)
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  16. Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn N. Zita (2007). The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body. Hypatia 22 (2):vii-xv.
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on "whiteness" in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
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  17. Katharine Lawrence Balfour (2005). Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in du Bois's "Damnation of Women". Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
    : In this essay, I contend that feminist theories of citizenship in the U.S. context must go beyond simply acknowledging the importance of race and grapple explicitly with the legacies of slavery. To sketch this case, I draw upon W.E.B. Du Bois's "The Damnation of Women," which explores the significance for all Americans of African American women's sexual, economic, and political lives under slavery and in its aftermath.
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  18. Elizabeth Ann Bartlett (1989). Sarah Grimké: Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and Other Essays. Hypatia 4 (1):175-180.
  19. Prins Baukje (2006). Narrative Accounts of Origins: A Blind Spot in the Intersectional Approach? European Journal of Women's Studies 13 (3):277-290.
    This paper uses a study of the life story narratives of former classmates of Dutch and Moluccan descent to argue that the constructionist approach to intersectionality, with its account of identity as a narrative construction rather than a practice of naming, offers better tools for answering questions concerning intersectional identity formation than a more systemic intersectional approach. The case study also highlights the importance of the quest for origins in narratives. It demonstrates that theories of intersectionality are unjustified in subsuming (...)
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  20. Kum-Kum Bhavnani & Meg Coulson (2003). Race'. In Mary Eagleton (ed.), A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell
  21. Alisa Bierria (2014). Missing in Action: Violence, Power, and Discerning Agency. Hypatia 29 (1):129-145.
    How can black feminist and women of color feminist theoretical interventions help create frameworks for discerning agentic action in the context of power, oppression, and violence? In this paper, I explore the social dimension of agency and argue that intention is not just authored by the agent as a function of practical reasoning, but is also socially authored through others' discernment and translation of her action. Further, when facilitated by reasoning designed to reinforce and rationalize systems of domination, social authoring (...)
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  22. Alisa Bierria (2012). “Where Them Bloggers At?”: Reflections on Rihanna, Accountability, and Survivor Subjectivity. Social Justice 37 (4):101-124.
    Two weeks after reports came to light that singer Chris Brown had physically assaulted and abandoned his girlfriend, famous Barbadian pop star Rihanna, the celebrity blog TMZ released a close-up photo of Rihanna’s face taken by the Los Angeles Police Department the night she was beaten. The news and the photo sparked fierce online debates about domestic violence and culpability. The locus of accountability in many of these debates seemed to circle back to Rihanna, rather than land squarely on Chris (...)
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  23. S. Bilge (2010). Recent Feminist Outlooks on Intersectionality. Diogenes 57 (1):58-72.
    With its recognition of the combined effects of the social categories of race, class and gender intersectionality has risen to the rank of feminism’s most important contribution to date. Though the first intersectional research (American and British) gave visibility to the social locus of women who self-identified as "black" or "of colour", current research goes beyond the confines of the English-speaking world and aims increasingly to develop an intersectional instrument to deal with discrimination. This project gives rise to two kinds (...)
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  24. Mary K. Bloodsworth (1999). Embodiment and Ambiguity: Luce Irigaray, Sexual Difference, and Race. International Studies in Philosophy 31 (2):69-90.
  25. Lawrence Blum (2010). Latinos on Race and Ethnicity : Alcoff, Corlett, and Gracia. In Susana Nuccetelli, Ofelia Schutte & Otávio Bueno (eds.), A Companion to Latin American Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
  26. Julian Bond (2002). Reflections on 9/11: Why Race, Class, Gender, and Religion Matter. Philosophia Africana 5 (2):1-11.
  27. Liam Kofi Bright, Daniel Malinsky & Morgan Thompson (2016). Causally Interpreting Intersectionality Theory. Philosophy of Science 83 (1):60-81.
    Social scientists report difficulties in drawing out testable predictions from the literature on intersectionality theory. We alleviate that difficulty by showing that some characteristic claims of the intersectionality literature can be interpreted causally. The formalism of graphical causal modeling allows claims about the causal effects of occupying intersecting identity categories to be clearly represented and submitted to empirical testing. After outlining this causal interpretation of intersectional theory, we address some concerns that have been expressed in the literature claiming that membership (...)
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  28. Elizabeth Butterfield (2003). Intersectionality. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (1):1-12.
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  29. Peter Nathaniel Bwanali (2004). The Foundations of the Politics of Difference. Dissertation, Marquette University
    This dissertation approaches Iris Marion Young's politics of difference as an essential condition for deliberative democracy. It identifies and examines Young's arguments in four areas foundational to the politics of difference namely, inclusion, political equality, reasonableness and publicity. It contends that some of the arguments sustaining these foundations are shaky. Therefore, the dissertation attempts to improve the weak aspects of Young's arguments in order to solidify the basis for the politics of difference and, in so doing, facilitate the development of (...)
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  30. Luisa Campuzano, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana & Casa de la Américas (1998). Mujeres Latinoamericanas Del Siglo Xx Historia y Cultura.
  31. Charlotte Canning (1996). Feminist Theaters in the U.S.A. Staging Women's Experience.
  32. Anna Carastathis (2014). Reinvigorating Intersectionality as a Provisional Concept. In Namita Goswami, Maeve O'Donovan & Lisa Yount (eds.), Why Race and Gender Still Matter: An Intersectional Approach. Pickering and Chatto 59-70.
    Challenging the triumphal narrative of ‘political completion’ that surrounds intersectionality--as ‘the’ way to theorize the relationship among systems of oppression--and which helps to cement the impression of mainstream feminism’s arrival at a postracial moment, I argue we should instead approach intersectionality as a ‘provisional concept’ which disorients entrenched essentialist cognitive habits. Rather than assume that ‘intersectionality’ has a stable, positive definition, I suggest intersectionality anticipates rather than delivers the normative or theoretical goals often imputed to it.
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  33. Anna Carastathis (2014). The Concept of Intersectionality in Feminist Theory. Philosophy Compass 9 (5):304-314.
    In feminist theory, intersectionality has become the predominant way of conceptualizing the relation between systems of oppression which construct our multiple identities and our social locations in hierarchies of power and privilege. The aim of this essay is to clarify the origins of intersectionality as a metaphor, and its theorization as a provisional concept in Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw’s work, followed by its uptake and mainstreaming as a paradigm by feminist theorists in a period marked by its widespread and rather unquestioned--if, (...)
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  34. Anna Carastathis (2013). Identity Categories as Potential Coalitions. Signs 38 (4):941-965.
    Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw ends her landmark essay “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color” with a normative claim about coalitions. She suggests that we should reconceptualize identity groups as “in fact coalitions,” or at least as “potential coalitions waiting to be formed.” In this essay, I explore this largely overlooked claim by combining philosophical analysis with archival research I conducted at the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Historical Society Archive in San Francisco about Somos Hermanas, (...)
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  35. Anna Carastathis (2013). Basements and Intersections. Hypatia 28 (4):698-715.
    In this paper, I revisit Kimberlé Crenshaw's argument in “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex” (1989) to recover a companion metaphor that has been largely forgotten in the “mainstreaming” of intersectionality in (white-dominated) feminist theory. In addition to the now-famous intersection metaphor, Crenshaw offers the basement metaphor to show how—by privileging monistic, mutually exclusive, and analogically constituted categories of “race” and “sex” tethered, respectively, to masculinity and whiteness—antidiscrimination law functions to reproduce social hierarchy, rather than to remedy it, denying (...)
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  36. Anna Carastathis, Feminism and the Political Economy of Representation : Intersectionality, Invisibility and Embodiment.
    It has become commonplace within feminist theory to claim that women's lives are constructed by multiple, intersecting systems of oppression. In this thesis, l challenge the consensus that oppression is aptly captured by the theoretical model of "intersectionality." While intersectionality originates in Black feminist thought as a purposive intervention into US antidiscrimination law, it has been detached from that context and harnessed to different representational aims. For instance, it is often asserted that intersectionality enables a representational politics that overcomes legacies (...)
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  37. Patricia Hill Collins (2003). Some Group Matters: Intersectionality, Situated Standpoints, and Black Feminist Thought. In Tommy Lee Lott & John P. Pittman (eds.), A Companion to African-American Philosophy. Blackwell Pub.
  38. Patricia Hill Collins (1998). It's All in the Family: Intersections of Gender, Race, and Nation. Hypatia 13 (3):62 - 82.
    Intersectionality has attracted substantial scholarly attention in the 1990s. Rather than examining gender, race, class, and nation as distinctive social hierarchies, intersectionality examines how they mutually construct one another. I explore how the traditional family ideal functions as a privileged exemplar of intersectionality in the United States. Each of its six dimensions demonstrates specific connections between family as a gendered system of social organization, racial ideas and practices, and constructions of U.S. national identity.
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  39. Patricia Hill Collins (1991/2008). Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness and the Politics of Empowerment. Routledge.
    In Black Feminist Thought, Patricia Hill Collins explores the words and ideas of Black feminist intellectuals as well as those African-American women outside academe. She not only provides an interpretive framework for the work of such prominent Black feminist thinkers as Angela Davis, Alice Walker, and Audre Lorde, but she shows the importance of self-defined knowledge for group empowerment. In the tenth anniversary edition of this award-winning work, Patricia Hill Collins expands the basic arguments of the first edition by adding (...)
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  40. Kimberle Williams Crenshaw (1991). Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color. Stanford Law Review 43 (6):1241-99.
  41. Kristie Dotson (2014). “Thinking Familiar with the Interstitial”: An Introduction. Hypatia 29 (1):1-17.
    It's not that we haven't always been here, since there was a here. It is that the letters of our names have been scrambled when they were not totally erased, and our fingertips upon the handles of history have been called the random brushings of birds. (Lorde , ix) Because… [racialized peoples'] dehumanization has not been successful, conceiving of self and others and their exercise of themselves both against dehumanization and toward liberatory possibilities has meant living double lives backed up (...)
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  42. Ann Ferguson (1991). Sexual Democracy: Women, Oppression and Revolution. Westview.
    This is a book in feminist theory and social and political philosophy. Many of the chapters are versions of earlier papers published as journal articles and as book chapters. It presents a multi-systems theory of social domination, discussing three main ones: economic class, gender and (social) race. It presents a maerialist feminist theory of gender and sexuality and discusses lesbian identity as well as issues of motherhood.
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  43. Make Fitts (2011). Theorizing Transformative Revolutionary Action. Clr James Journal 17 (1):112-132.
    bell hooks is one of the seminal feminist theoreticians whose body of work not only provides discursive understandings of intersectional modes of oppression, but also a conceptual roadmap for creating the material conditions that lead to social transformation. In this essay, I posit the formulation of a theory of transformative revolutionary action that comes out of hoolis' ruminations on the following concepts: marginality as a position and place of resistance, killing rage, revolutionary interdependency and the politics of sisterhood, and the (...)
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  44. Ann Garry (2011). Intersectionality, Metaphors, and the Multiplicity of Gender. Hypatia 26 (4):826-850.
    Although intersectional analyses of gender have been widely adopted by feminist theorists in many disciplines, controversy remains over their character, limitations, and implications. I support intersectionality, cautioning against asking too much of it. It provides standards for the uses of methods or frameworks rather than theories of power, oppression, agency, or identity. I want feminist philosophers to incorporate intersectional analyses more fully into our work so that our theories can, in fact, have the pluralistic and inclusive character to which we (...)
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  45. Ann Garry (2008). Essences, Intersections, and American Feminism. In C. J. Misak (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of American Philosophy. Oxford University Press
  46. Laura Gillman (2014). Anancyism and the Dialectics of an Africana Feminist Ethnophilosophy: Sandra Jackson‐Opoku's The River Where Blood Is Born. Hypatia 29 (1):164-181.
    Although intersectionality has been widely disseminated across the disciplines as a tool to center women of color's developed perspectives on social reality, it has been notably absent in the scholarship of feminist philosophy and philosophy of race. I first examine the causes and processes of the exclusions of women of color feminist thought more generally, and of intersectionality in particular. Then, focusing attention on Black feminisms, I read Sandra Jackson-Opoku's 1997 novel, The River Where Blood Is Born, with and against (...)
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  47. Kathryn T. Gines (2011). Black Feminism and Intersectional Analyses. Philosophy Today 55 (Supplement):275-284.
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  48. Namita Goswami, Maeve M. O'Donavan & Lisa Yount (eds.) (forthcoming). Why Race and Gender Still Matter. Pickering Chatto.
    Intersectionality, the attempt to bring theories on race, gender, disability and sexuality together, has existed for over a decade as a theoretical framework. Despite this it remains almost entirely absent from contemporary philosophical thinking. The essays in this volume explore how intersectionality can be applied to modern philosophy, as well as looking at other disciplines – political science, education, law, art and history – where work on philosophical intersectionalism is already developing.
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  49. Namita Goswami, Maeve M. O'Donavan & Lisa Yount (eds.) (2014). Why Race and Gender Still Matter. Pickering Chatto.
    Intersectionality, the attempt to bring theories on race, gender, disability and sexuality together, has existed for over a decade as a theoretical framework. Despite this it remains almost entirely absent from contemporary philosophical thinking. The essays in this volume explore how intersectionality can be applied to modern philosophy, as well as looking at other disciplines – political science, education, law, art and history – where work on philosophical intersectionalism is already developing.
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  50. Namita Goswami, Maeve O'Donovan & Lisa Yount (eds.) (2014). Why Race and Gender Still Matter: An Intersectional Approach. Pickering and Chatto.
    Intersectionality, the attempt to bring theories on race, gender, disability and sexuality together, has existed for decades as a theoretical framework. The essays in this volume explore how intersectionality can be applied to modern philosophy, as well as looking at other disciplines.
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