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  1. Linda Martin Alcoff, On Prejudging the Duke Lacrosse Team Scandal.
    First, we should separate out the two distinct realms of discourse that are operative in this scandal: the formal legal one, from the informal public one. Each realm has different standards of judgment, and plays a different role. The formal, legal realm is organized to determine the legal guilt of innocence of the individuals accused, while it should be clear that the public realm—that diffuse and loose amalgam of both formal and informal communications—cannot determine individual legal guilt or innocence. First, (...)
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  2. Linda Martin Alcoff, The Problem of Speaking for Others.
    This was published in Cultural Critique (Winter 1991-92), pp. 5-32; revised and reprinted in Who Can Speak? Authority and Critical Identity edited by Judith Roof and Robyn Wiegman, University of Illinois Press, 1996; and in Feminist Nightmares: Women at Odds edited by Susan Weisser and Jennifer Fleischner, (New York: New York University Press, 1994); and also in Racism and Sexism: Differences and Connections eds. David Blumenfeld and Linda Bell, Rowman and Littlefield, 1995.
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  3. Linda Martín Alcoff (2008). Surviving Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality by Jorge J. E. Gracia; Mapping the Boundaries of Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality. International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (2):231-238.
  4. Linda Martín Alcoff (2003). Latino/as, Asian Americans, and the Black–White Binary. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):5-27.
    This paper aims to contribute toward coalitionbuilding by showing that, even if we try tobuild coalition around what might look like ourmost obvious common concern – reducing racism –the dominant discourse of racial politics inthe United States inhibits an understanding ofhow racism operates vis-à-vis Latino/as andAsian Americans, and thus proves more of anobstacle to coalition building than an aid. Theblack/white paradigm, which operates to governracial classifications and racial politics inthe U.S., takes race in the U.S. to consist ofonly two racial (...)
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  5. Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.) (2007). The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
    The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy is a definitive introduction to the field, consisting of 15 newly-contributed essays that apply philosophical methods and approaches to feminist concerns. Offers a key view of the project of centering women’s experience. Includes topics such as feminism and pragmatism, lesbian philosophy, feminist epistemology, and women in the history of philosophy.
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  6. Floya Anthias & Pilar Rodríguez Martínez (eds.) (2006). Feminismos Periféricos: Discutiendo Las Categorías Sexo, Clase y Raza (y Etnicidad) Con Floya Anthias. Alhulia.
  7. Anthony Appiah (1990). But Would That Still Be Me?&Quot; Notes on Gender, "Race," Ethnicity, as Sources of "Identity. Journal of Philosophy 87 (10):493-499.
  8. Yoko Arisaka, Asian Women: Invisibility, Locations, and Claims to Philosophy.
    “Asian women” is an ambiguous category; it seems to indicate a racial as well as a cultural designation. The number of articles or books on being Asian or Asian-American is on the rise in other disciplines, but in comparison to the material on black or Hispanic identities, Asians are largely missing from the field of philosophy of race. Things Asian in philosophy are generally reserved for those who study Asian philosophy or comparative philosophy, but that focus usually excludes reflections on (...)
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  9. Alison Bailey (2010). On Intersectionality and the Whiteness of Feminist Philosophy. In George Yancy (ed.), THE CENTER MUST NOT HOLD: WHITE WOMEN PHILOSOPHERS ON THE WHITENESS OF PHILOSOPHY. Lexington Books.
    In this paper I explore some possible reasons why white feminists philosophers have failed to engage the radical work being done by non-Western women, U.S. women of color and scholars of color outside of the discipline. -/- Feminism and academic philosophy have had lots to say to one another. Yet part of what marks feminist philosophy as philosophy is our engagement with the intellectual traditions of the white forefathers. I’m not uncomfortable with these projects: Aristotle, Foucault, Sartre, Wittgenstein, Quine, Austin, (...)
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  10. Alison Bailey (2008). On Intersectionality, Empathy, and Feminist Solidarity. Peace and Justice Studies 18 (2):14-36.
    Naomi Zack's Inclusive Feminism: A Third Wave Theory of Women's Commonality (2005) begins with an original reading of the paradigm shift that ended U.S. second wave feminism. According to Zack there has been a crisis in academic and professional feminism since the late 1970s. It grew out of the anxieties about essentialism in the wake of white feminist's realization that our understandings of "sisterhood" and "women" excluded women of color and poor women. This realization eventually lead to the movement's foundational (...)
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  11. Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn N. Zita (2007). The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body. Hypatia 22 (2).
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on "whiteness" in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
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  12. Katharine Lawrence Balfour (2005). Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in du Bois's "Damnation of Women". Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
    : In this essay, I contend that feminist theories of citizenship in the U.S. context must go beyond simply acknowledging the importance of race and grapple explicitly with the legacies of slavery. To sketch this case, I draw upon W.E.B. Du Bois's "The Damnation of Women," which explores the significance for all Americans of African American women's sexual, economic, and political lives under slavery and in its aftermath.
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  13. Linda A. Bell (2007). Book Review: Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self by Linda Mart�N Alcoff. [REVIEW] Hypatia 22 (2):196-200.
  14. Kum-Kum Bhavnani & Meg Coulson (2003). Race'. In Mary Eagleton (ed.), A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell.
  15. S. Bilge (2010). Recent Feminist Outlooks on Intersectionality. Diogenes 57 (1):58-72.
    With its recognition of the combined effects of the social categories of race, class and gender intersectionality has risen to the rank of feminism’s most important contribution to date. Though the first intersectional research (American and British) gave visibility to the social locus of women who self-identified as "black" or "of colour", current research goes beyond the confines of the English-speaking world and aims increasingly to develop an intersectional instrument to deal with discrimination. This project gives rise to two kinds (...)
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  16. Lawrence Blum (2010). Latinos on Race and Ethnicity : Alcoff, Corlett, and Gracia. In Susana Nuccetelli, Ofelia Schutte & Otávio Bueno (eds.), A Companion to Latin American Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
  17. Julian Bond (2002). Reflections on 9/11: Why Race, Class, Gender, and Religion Matter. Philosophia Africana 5 (2):1-11.
  18. Elizabeth Butterfield (2003). Intersectionality. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (1):1-12.
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  19. Anna Carastathis (2014). Reinvigorating Intersectionality as a Provisional Concept. In Namita Goswami, Maeve O'Donovan & Lisa Yount (eds.), Why Race and Gender Still Matter: An Intersectional Approach. Pickering and Chatto. 59-70.
    Challenging the triumphal narrative of ‘political completion’ that surrounds intersectionality--as ‘the’ way to theorize the relationship among systems of oppression--and which helps to cement the impression of mainstream feminism’s arrival at a postracial moment, I argue we should instead approach intersectionality as a ‘provisional concept’ which disorients entrenched essentialist cognitive habits. Rather than assume that ‘intersectionality’ has a stable, positive definition, I suggest intersectionality anticipates rather than delivers the normative or theoretical goals often imputed to it.
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  20. Anna Carastathis (2014). The Concept of Intersectionality in Feminist Theory. Philosophy Compass 9 (5):304-314.
    In feminist theory, intersectionality has become the predominant way of conceptualizing the relation between systems of oppression which construct our multiple identities and our social locations in hierarchies of power and privilege. The aim of this essay is to clarify the origins of intersectionality as a metaphor, and its theorization as a provisional concept in Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw’s work, followed by its uptake and mainstreaming as a paradigm by feminist theorists in a period marked by its widespread and rather unquestioned--if, (...)
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  21. Anna Carastathis (2013). Basements and Intersections. Hypatia 28 (4):698-715.
    In this paper, I revisit Kimberlé Crenshaw's argument in “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex” (1989) to recover a companion metaphor that has been largely forgotten in the “mainstreaming” of intersectionality in (white-dominated) feminist theory. In addition to the now-famous intersection metaphor, Crenshaw offers the basement metaphor to show how—by privileging monistic, mutually exclusive, and analogically constituted categories of “race” and “sex” tethered, respectively, to masculinity and whiteness—antidiscrimination law functions to reproduce social hierarchy, rather than to remedy it, denying (...)
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  22. Anna Carastathis (2013). Identity Categories as Potential Coalitions. Signs 38 (4):941-965.
    Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw ends her landmark essay “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color” with a normative claim about coalitions. She suggests that we should reconceptualize identity groups as “in fact coalitions,” or at least as “potential coalitions waiting to be formed.” In this essay, I explore this largely overlooked claim by combining philosophical analysis with archival research I conducted at the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Historical Society Archive in San Francisco about Somos Hermanas, (...)
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  23. Anna Carastathis, Feminism and the Political Economy of Representation : Intersectionality, Invisibility and Embodiment.
    It has become commonplace within feminist theory to claim that women's lives are constructed by multiple, intersecting systems of oppression. In this thesis, l challenge the consensus that oppression is aptly captured by the theoretical model of "intersectionality." While intersectionality originates in Black feminist thought as a purposive intervention into US antidiscrimination law, it has been detached from that context and harnessed to different representational aims. For instance, it is often asserted that intersectionality enables a representational politics that overcomes legacies (...)
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  24. Patricia Hill Collins (2003). Some Group Matters: Intersectionality, Situated Standpoints, and Black Feminist Thought. In Tommy Lee Lott & John P. Pittman (eds.), A Companion to African-American Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
  25. Patricia Hill Collins (1998). It's All in the Family: Intersections of Gender, Race, and Nation. Hypatia 13 (3):62 - 82.
    Intersectionality has attracted substantial scholarly attention in the 1990s. Rather than examining gender, race, class, and nation as distinctive social hierarchies, intersectionality examines how they mutually construct one another. I explore how the traditional family ideal functions as a privileged exemplar of intersectionality in the United States. Each of its six dimensions demonstrates specific connections between family as a gendered system of social organization, racial ideas and practices, and constructions of U.S. national identity.
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  26. Kristie Dotson (2014). “Thinking Familiar with the Interstitial”: An Introduction. Hypatia 29 (1):1-17.
    It's not that we haven't always been here, since there was a here. It is that the letters of our names have been scrambled when they were not totally erased, and our fingertips upon the handles of history have been called the random brushings of birds. (Lorde , ix) Because… [racialized peoples'] dehumanization has not been successful, conceiving of self and others and their exercise of themselves both against dehumanization and toward liberatory possibilities has meant living double lives backed up (...)
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  27. Ann Ferguson (1991). Sexual Democracy: Women, Oppression and Revolution. Westview.
    This is a book in feminist theory and social and political philosophy. Many of the chapters are versions of earlier papers published as journal articles and as book chapters. It presents a multi-systems theory of social domination, discussing three main ones: economic class, gender and (social) race. It presents a maerialist feminist theory of gender and sexuality and discusses lesbian identity as well as issues of motherhood.
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  28. Make Fitts (2011). Theorizing Transformative Revolutionary Action. Clr James Journal 17 (1):112-132.
    bell hooks is one of the seminal feminist theoreticians whose body of work not only provides discursive understandings of intersectional modes of oppression, but also a conceptual roadmap for creating the material conditions that lead to social transformation. In this essay, I posit the formulation of a theory of transformative revolutionary action that comes out of hoolis' ruminations on the following concepts: marginality as a position and place of resistance, killing rage, revolutionary interdependency and the politics of sisterhood, and the (...)
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  29. Ann Garry (2011). Intersectionality, Metaphors, and the Multiplicity of Gender. Hypatia 26 (4):826-850.
    Although intersectional analyses of gender have been widely adopted by feminist theorists in many disciplines, controversy remains over their character, limitations, and implications. I support intersectionality, cautioning against asking too much of it. It provides standards for the uses of methods or frameworks rather than theories of power, oppression, agency, or identity. I want feminist philosophers to incorporate intersectional analyses more fully into our work so that our theories can, in fact, have the pluralistic and inclusive character to which we (...)
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  30. Ann Garry (2008). Essences, Intersections, and American Feminism. In C. J. Misak (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of American Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  31. Laura Gillman (2014). Anancyism and the Dialectics of an Africana Feminist Ethnophilosophy: Sandra Jackson‐Opoku's The River Where Blood Is Born. Hypatia 29 (1):164-181.
    Although intersectionality has been widely disseminated across the disciplines as a tool to center women of color's developed perspectives on social reality, it has been notably absent in the scholarship of feminist philosophy and philosophy of race. I first examine the causes and processes of the exclusions of women of color feminist thought more generally, and of intersectionality in particular. Then, focusing attention on Black feminisms, I read Sandra Jackson-Opoku's 1997 novel, The River Where Blood Is Born, with and against (...)
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  32. Kathryn T. Gines (2011). Black Feminism and Intersectional Analyses. Philosophy Today 55 (Supplement):275-284.
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  33. Lena Gunnarsson (2011). A Defence of the Category ‘Women’. Feminist Theory 12 (1):23-37.
    Against influential strands of feminist theory, I argue that there is nothing essentialist or homogenising about the category ‘women’. I show that both intersectional claims that it is impossible to separate out the ‘woman part’ of women, and deconstructionist contentions that the category ‘women’ is a fiction, rest on untenable meta-theoretical assumptions. I posit that a more fruitful way of approaching this disputed category is to treat it as an abstraction. Drawing on the philosophical framework of critical realism I elucidate (...)
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  34. Sabrina L. Hom (2013). Between Races and Generations: Materializing Race and Kinship in Moraga and Irigaray. Hypatia 28 (3):419-435.
    Juxtaposing Cherríe Moraga's Loving in the War Years and Luce Irigaray's Speculum of the Other Woman, I explore the ways that sex and race intersect to complicate an Irigarayan account of the relations between mother and daughter. Irigaray's work is an effective tool for understanding the disruptive and potentially healing desire between mothers and daughters, but her insistence on sex as primary difference must be challenged in order to acknowledge the intersectionality of sex and race. Working from recent work on (...)
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  35. Ada S. Jaarsma (2010). Rethinking the Secular in Feminist Marriage Debates. Studies in Social Justice 4 (1):47-66.
    The religious right often aligns its patriarchal opposition to same-sex marriage with the defence of religious freedom. In this article, I identify resources for confronting such prejudicial religiosity by surveying two predominant feminist approaches to same-sex marriage that are often assumed to be at odds: discourse ethics and queer critical theory. This comparative analysis opens up to view commitments that may not be fully recognizable from within either feminist framework: commitments to ideals of selfhood, to specific conceptions of justice, and (...)
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  36. Robin James (2011). On Intersectionality and Cultural Appropriation: The Case of Postmillennial Black Hipness. Journal of Black Masculinity 1 (2).
    Feminist, critical race, and postcolonial theories have established that social identities such as race and gender are mutually constitutive—i.e., that they “intersect.” I argue that “cultural appropriation” is never merely the appropriation of culture, but also of gender, sexuality, class, etc. For example, “white hipness” is the appropriation of stereotypical black masculinity by white males. Looking at recent videos from black male hip-hop artists, I develop an account of “postmillennial black hipness.” The inverse of white hipness, this practice involves the (...)
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  37. Serene J. Khader (2013). Intersectionality and the Ethics of Transnational Commercial Surrogacy. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):68-90.
    Critics of transnational commercial surrogacy frequently call our attention to the race, class, and cultural background of surrogates in the global South. Consider the following sampling from the critics: "the women having babies for rich Westerners have been pimped by their husbands and are powerless to resist" (Bindel 2011); our "rules of decency seem to differ when the women in question are living in abject poverty half a world away" (Warner 2008); and we should worry that "women of color are (...)
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  38. Melissa M. Kozma & Jeanine Weekes Schroer (forthcoming). Purposeful Nonsense, Intersectionality, and the Mission to Save Black Babies. In Namita Goswami, Maeve O'Donavan & Lisa Yount (eds.), Why Race and Gender Still Matter: An Intersectional Approach. Pickering & Chatto Ltd.
    The competing expressions of ideology flooding the contemporary political landscape have taken a turn toward the absurd. The Radiance Foundation’s recent anti-abortion campaign targeting African-American women, including a series of billboards bearing the slogan “The most dangerous place for an African-American child is in the womb”, is just one example of political "discourse" that is both infuriating and confounding. Discourse with these features – problematic intelligibility, disinterest in the truth, and inflammatory rhetoric – has become increasingly common in politics, the (...)
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  39. Wendy Lynne Lee (2010). Contemporary Feminist Theory and Activism: Six Global Issues. Broadview.
    From divorce and property law to (more) equal pay and the recognition of reproductive rights, feminist theory and practice –– and sweat, risk, ...
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  40. Annabelle Lever (2011). Treating People as Equals: Ethical Objections to Racial Profiling and the Composition of Juries. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 15 (1/2):61 - 78.
    This paper shows that the problem of treating people as equals in a world marked by deep-seated and, often, recalcitrant inequalities has implications for the way we approach the provision of security and justice. On the one hand, it means that racial profiling will generally be unjustified even when it might promote collective interests in security, on the other, it means that we should strive to create racially mixed juries, even in cases where defendant and alleged-victim are of the same (...)
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  41. Annabelle Lever (2004). Anita L. Allen, Why Privacy Isn't Everything: Feminist Reflections on Personal Accountability Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (1):1-3.
  42. Maria Lugones (2007). Heterosexualism and the Colonial / Modern Gender System. Hypatia 22 (1):186-209.
    : The coloniality of power is understood by Anibal Quijano as at the constituting crux of the global capitalist system of power. What is characteristic of global, Eurocentered, capitalist power is that it is organized around two axes that Quijano terms "the coloniality of power" and "modernity." The coloniality of power introduces the basic and universal social classification of the population of the planet in terms of the idea of race, a replacing of relations of superiority and inferiority established through (...)
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  43. Vivian M. May (2014). “Speaking Into the Void”? Intersectionality Critiques and Epistemic Backlash. Hypatia 29 (1):94-112.
    Taking up Kimberlé Crenshaw's conclusion that black feminist theorists seem to continue to find themselves in many ways “speaking into the void” (Crenshaw 2011, 228), even as their works are widely celebrated, I examine intersectionality critiques as one site where power asymmetries and dominant imaginaries converge in the act of interpretation (or cooptation) of intersectionality. That is, despite its current “status,” intersectionality also faces epistemic intransigence in the ways in which it is read and applied. My aim is not to (...)
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  44. Vivian M. May (2004). Thinking From the Margins, Acting at the Intersections: Anna Julia Cooper's. Hypatia 19 (2).
    : Anna Julia Cooper's 1892 A Voice from the South is a hybrid text that speaks provocatively to contemporary feminist philosophy. Negotiating exclusionary categories of being and knowing and writing herself into intellectual traditions meant to exclude her, Cooper's narrative methods are politically tactical and epistemologically significant. Cooper inserts subjectivity into objective analysis and underscores knowledge as located and embodied. By speaking from spaces of exclusion, Cooper fully articulates the promise of intersectional approaches to liberation.
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  45. Vivian M. May (2004). Thinking From the Margins, Acting at the Intersections: Anna Julia Cooper's A Voice From the South. Hypatia 19 (2):74 - 91.
    Anna Julia Cooper's 1892 A Voice from the South is a hybrid text that speaks provocatively to contemporary feminist philosophy. Negotiating exclusionary categories of being and knowing and writing herself into intellectual traditions meant to exclude her, Cooper's narrative methods are politically tactical and epistemologically significant. Cooper inserts subjectivity into objective analysis and underscores knowledge as located and embodied. By speaking from spaces of exclusion, Cooper fully articulates the promise of intersectional approaches to liberation.
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  46. Jennifer McWeeny (2011). The Reversibility of Teacher and Student: Teaching/Learning Intersectionality and Activism Amidst the LGBTQ Protest. American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues 10 (2):5-12.
  47. Ladelle McWhorter (2004). Sex, Race, and Biopower: A Foucauldian Genealogy. Hypatia 19 (3):38-62.
    : For many years feminists have asserted an "intersection" between sex and race. This paper, drawing heavily on the work of Michel Foucault, offers a genealogical account of the two concepts showing how they developed together and in relation to similar political forces in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Thus it attempts to give a concrete meaning to the claim that sex and race are intersecting phenomena.
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  48. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2000). Intersectional Identity and the Authentic Self? Opposites Attract. In Catriona Mackenzie & Natalie Stoljar (eds.), relational autonomy. oxford university press.
  49. Gail M. Presbey (1990). Racism and Sexism. Radical Philosophy Review of Books 2 (2):29-32.
  50. Prins, Baukje, Narrative Accounts of Origins: A Blind Spot in the Intersectional Approach?
    This paper uses a study of the life story narratives of former classmates of Dutch and Moluccan descent to argue that the constructionist approach to intersectionality, with its account of identity as a narrative construction rather than a practice of naming, offers better tools for answering questions concerning intersectional identity formation than a more systemic intersectional approach. The case study also highlights the importance of the quest for origins in narratives. It demonstrates that theories of intersectionality are unjustified in subsuming (...)
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