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  1. Francis Kofi Abiew (2010). Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: Redefining a Role for “Kind-Hearted Gunmen”. Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (2):93-109.
  2. Mireille Affa'A. Mindzie (2010). Intervention and Protection in African Crisis Situations: Evolution and Ethical Challenges. Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (2):174-193.
  3. Mireille Affa'A. Mindzie (2010). Intervention and Protection in African Crisis Situations: Evolution and Ethical Challenges. Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (2):174-193.
  4. Kwame Akonor (2010). Assessing the African Union's Right of Humanitarian Intervention. Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (2):157-173.
  5. Marcus Arvan (2009). In Defense of Discretionary Association Theories of Political Legitimacy: Reply to Buchanan. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy.
    Allen Buchanan has argued that a widely defended view of the nature of the state – the view that the state is a discretionary association for the mutual advantage of its members – must be rejected because it cannot adequately account for moral requirements of humanitarian intervention. This paper argues that Buchanan’s objection is unsuccessful,and moreover, that discretionary association theories can preserve an important distinction that Buchanan’s alternative approach to political legitimacy cannot: the distinction between “internal” legitimacy (a state’s ability (...)
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  6. Michael Baumgartner (2013). Rendering Interventionism and Non‐Reductive Physicalism Compatible. Dialectica 67 (1):1-27.
    In recent years, the debate on the problem of causal exclusion has seen an ‘interventionist turn’. Numerous non-reductive physicalists (e.g. Shapiro and Sober 2007) have argued that Woodward's (2003) interventionist theory of causation provides a means to empirically establish the existence of non-reducible mental-to-physical causation. By contrast, Baumgartner (2010) has presented an interventionist exclusion argument showing that interventionism is in fact incompatible with non-reductive physicalism. In response, a number of revised versions of interventionism have been suggested that are compatible with (...)
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  7. Endre Begby (forthcoming). A Role for Coercive Force in the Theory of Global Justice? In Thom Brooks (ed.), New Waves in Gobal Justice. Palgrave-MacMillan.
  8. Endre Begby (2010). Rawlsian Compromises in Peacebuilding? Response to Agafonow. Public Reason 2 (2):51-60.
    This paper responds to recent criticism from Alejandro Agafonow. In section I, I argue that the dilemma that Agafonow points to – while real – is in no way unique to liberal peacebuilding. Rather, it arises with respect to any foreign involvement in post-conflict reconstruction. I argue further that Agafonow’s proposal for handling this dilemma suffers from several shortcomings: first, it provides no sense of the magnitude and severity of the “oppressive practices” that peacebuilders should be willing to institutionalize. Second, (...)
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  9. Endre Begby & J. Peter Burgess (2009). Human Security and Liberal Peace. Public Reason 1 (1):91-104.
    This paper addresses a recent wave of criticisms of liberal peacebuilding operations. We decompose the critics’ argument into two steps, one which offers a diagnosis of what goes wrong when things go wrong in peacebuilding operations, and a second, which argues on the basis of the first step that there is some deep principled flaw in the very idea of liberal peacebuilding. We show that the criticism launched in the argument’s first step is valid and important, but that the second (...)
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  10. Charles R. Beitz (1980). Nonintervention and Communal Integrity. Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (4):385-391.
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  11. Michael Blake (2007). Toleration and Theocracy: How Liberal States Should Think About Religious States. Journal of International Affairs 61 (1):1-17.
  12. Thom Brooks (2011). Rethinking Remedial Responsibilities. Ethics and Global Politics 4 (3).
    How should we determine which nations have a responsibility to remedy suffering elsewhere? The problem is pressing because, following David Miller, ‘[it] is morally intolerable if (remediable) suffering and deprivation are allowed to continue . . . where they exist we are morally bound to hold somebody (some person or collective agent) responsible for relieving them’. Miller offers a connection theory of remedial responsibilities in response to this problem, a theory he has been developing over the last decade. This theory (...)
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  13. Allen Buchanan (2013). The Ethics of Revolution and Its Implications for the Ethics of Intervention. Philosophy and Public Affairs 41 (4):291-323.
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  14. Rory J. Conces (2001). Justifying Coercive and Non-Coercive Intervention: Strategic and Humanitarian Arguments. Acta Analytica 16 (27):133-52.
    The world's political and military leaders are under increasing pressure to intervene in the affairs of sovereign nations. Although the sovereignty of states and the corollary principle of nonintervention have been part of the foundation of international law, there is some latitude for states, as well as collective security organizations, to intervene in another state's domestic and foreign affairs, thus making sovereignty and the principle less than absolute. In this paper I first sketch a reasonable foundation for sovereignty of states (...)
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  15. Rory J. Conces (1998). Review of Richard Holbrooke, To End a War. [REVIEW] International Third World Studies Journal and Review 10:77-79.
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  16. David Fagelson (2003). Building Democracy And The Rule of Law. Polity 36 (1):139-151.
  17. Robert Fine (2007). Cosmopolitanism. New York.
    Preface : twenty theses on cosmopolitan social theory -- Taking the "ism" out of cosmopolitanism : the equivocations of the new cosmopolitanism -- Confronting reputations : Kant's cosmopolitanism and Hegel's critique -- Cosmopolitanism and political community : the equivocations of constitutional patriotism -- Cosmopolitanism and international law : from the law of peoples to the constitutionalisation of international law -- Cosmopolitanism and humanitarian military intervention : war, peace and human rights -- Cosmopolitanism and punishment : prosecuting crimes against humanity -- (...)
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  18. Maria JoãBo Ferreira & Pedro F. Marcelino (2011). Politics in Trauma Times: Of Subjectivity, War, and Humanitarian Intervention. Ethics and Global Politics 4 (2).
  19. Steven Lee (2011). The Who and the Why of Humanitarian Intervention. Criminal Justice Ethics 30 (3):302-308.
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  20. Matthew Lister (2012). There is No Human Right to Democracy. But May We Promote It Anyway? Stanford Journal of International Law 48 (2):257.
    The idea of “promoting democracy” is one that goes in and out of favor. With the advent of the so-called “Arab Spring”, the idea of promoting democracy abroad has come up for discussion once again. Yet an important recent line of thinking about human rights, starting with John Rawls’s book The Law of Peoples, has held that there is no human right to democracy, and that nondemocratic states that respect human rights should be “beyond reproach” in the realm of international (...)
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  21. Matthew J. Lister (2011). Are Institutions and Empiricism Enough? [REVIEW] Transnational Legal Theory 2 (1).
    Legal philosophers have given relatively little attention to international law in comparison to other topics, and philosophers working on international or global justice have not taken international law as a primary focus, either. Allen Buchanan's recent work is arguably the most important exception to these trends. For over a decade he has devoted significant time and philosophical skill to questions central to international law, and has tied these concerns to related issues of global justice more generally. In what follows I (...)
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  22. Matthew J. Lister (2008). Gang-Related Asylum Claims: An Overview and Prescription. University of Memphis Law Review 38 (4).
    Over the last several years asylum cases relating to activities of criminal gangs have greatly increased in frequency. Cases involving Central American gangs, the so-called maras, have attracted the most attention but similar cases have arisen out of South Eastern and Eastern Europe as well. Applicants in such cases face a number of difficulties as their cases do not fit into paradigm categories for asylum claims. These cases almost always involve non-state actors, for example, acting for reasons that are not, (...)
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  23. Mark Rigstad, Jus Ad Bellum After 9/11: A State of the Art Report. International Political Theory Beacon.
    An examination of the applicability of conventional and revisionist just war principles to the global war on terror.
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  24. Sagar Sanyal (2009). US Military and Covert Action and Global Justice. International Journal of applied philosophy 23 (2):213-234.
    US military intervention and covert action is a significant contributor to global injustice. Discussion of this contributor to global injustice is relatively common in social justice movements. Yet it has been ignored by the global justice literature in political philosophy. This paper aims to fill this gap by introducing the topic into the global justice debate. While the global justice debate has focused on inter-national and supra-national institutions, I argue that an adequate analysis of US military and covert action must (...)
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  25. Edward Song (2010). Subjectivist Cosmopolitanism and the Morality of Intervention. Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (2):137-151.
    While cosmopolitans are right to think that state sovereignty is derived from individuals, many cosmopolitan accounts can be too demanding in their expectations for illiberal regimes because they do not account for the attitudes of the persons with who will subject to the intervention. These ‘objectivist’ accounts suggest that sovereignty is wholly a matter of a state’s conformity to the objective demands of justice. In contrast, for ‘subjectivist’ accounts, the attitudes of citizens do matter. Subjectivist cosmopolitans do not deny the (...)
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  26. Lynn Stout, Cultivating Conscience & How Good Laws Make Good People (2010). James Pattison, Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. Viii 296. Adam D. Reich, Hidden Truth: Young Men Negotiating Lives In and Out of Juvenile Prison. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2010. Pp. Xviii 270. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (3):315.
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  27. Ericka Tucker (2012). Developing Normative Consensus: How the ‘International Scene’ Reshapes the Debate Over the Internal and External Criticism of Harmful Social Practices. Journal of East-West Thought 2 (1):107-121.
    Can we ever justly critique the norms and practices of another culture? When activists or policy-makers decide that one culture’s traditional practice is harmful and needs to be eradicated, does it matter whether they are members of that culture? Given the history of imperialism, many argue that any critique of another culture’s practices must be internal. Others argue that we can appeal to a universal standard of human wellbeing to determine whether or not a particular practice is legitimate or whether (...)
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  28. Bas van der Vossen (2014). The Morality of Humanitarian Intervention. In Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher H. Wellman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley Blackwell. 404-416.
  29. Bas van der Vossen (2013). The Ethics of Preventive War, Deen Chatterjee (Ed.). [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.