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  1. Anna Alexandrova (2009). The Invisible Hand in Economics: How Economists Explain Unintended Social Consequences , N. Emrah Aydinonat, Routledge, 2008, XVI + 258 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 25 (3):371-378.
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  2. Jonny Anomaly & Geoffrey Brennan (2014). Social Norms, The Invisible Hand, and the Law. University of Queensland Law Journal 33 (2).
  3. N. Emrah Aydinonat (2010). Is Spontaneous Order a Value-Free Descriptive Methodological Tool? Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (4):448-452.
  4. N. Emrah Aydinonat (2008). The Invisible Hand in Economics: How Economists Explain Unintended Social Consequences. Routledge.
    Introduction -- Unintended consequences -- The origin of money -- Segregation -- The invisible hand -- The origin of money reconsidered -- Models and representation -- Game theory and conventions -- Conclusion.
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  5. Christopher J. Berry, Maria Pia Paganelli & Craig Smith (eds.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of Adam Smith. Oxford University Press.
    Preface Introduction Christopher J. Berry: Adam Smith: Outline of Life, Times, and Legacy Part One: Adam Smith: Heritage and Contemporaries 1: Nicholas Phillipson: Adam Smith: A Biographer's Reflections 2: Leonidas Montes: Newtonianism and Adam Smith 3: Dennis C. Rasmussen: Adam Smith and Rousseau: Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment 4: Christopher J. Berry: Adam Smith and Early Modern Thought Part Two: Adam Smith on Language, Art and Culture 5: Catherine Labio: Adam Smith's Aesthetics 6: James Chandler: Adam Smith as Critic 7: Michael C. (...)
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  6. Geoffrey Brennan & Philip Pettit (1993). Hands Invisible and Intangible. Synthese 94 (2):191 - 225.
    The notion of a spontaneous social order, an order in human affairs which operates without the intervention of any directly ordering mind, has a natural fascination for social and political theorists. This paper provides a taxonomy under which there are two broadly contrasting sorts of spontaneous social order. One is the familiar invisible hand; the other is an arrangement that we describe as the intangible hand. The paper is designed to serve two main purposes. First, to provide a pure account (...)
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  7. Nicola Giocoli (2012). The Hesitant Hand. Taming Self-Interest in the History of Economic Ideas. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (4):451-457.
    Journal of Economic Methodology, Volume 19, Issue 4, Page 451-457, December 2012.
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  8. Scott Gordon (1985). The Soul of Modern Economic Man: Ideas of Self Interest, Thomas Hobbes to Adam Smith, Milton L. Myers, Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1983, 157 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 1 (01):139-.
  9. Daniel Hausman (2001). Explanation and diagnosis in economics. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 3:311-326.
  10. David L. Hull (1997). What's Wrong with Invisible-Hand Explanations? Philosophy of Science 64 (4):126.
    An invisible hand seems to play an important role in science. In this paper I set out the general structure of invisible-hand explanations, counter some objections that have been raised to them, and detail the role that they play in science. The most important issue is the character of the mechanisms that are supposed to bring about invisible-hand effects.
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  11. Aki Lehtinen (2009). Intentions in Invisible-Hand Accounts. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (4):409-416.
    N. Emrah Aydinonat's account of the invisible-hand is analysed. One of the conditions for unintended social consequences is it requires that individuals' intentions are exclusively directed at the individual level. This condition is weakened in order to accommodate cases in which individuals may also aim at consequences at the social level but the model clearly depicts the invisible hand. Lehtinen's model of counterbalancing strategic votes is proposed as an example that satisfies Aydinonat's conditions, if they are modified as suggested.
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  12. Robert J. Leonard (1993). The Invisible Hand, Economic Equilibrium in the History of Science, Bruna Ingrao and Giorgio Israel. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1991, 491 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 9 (01):178-.
  13. Thomas C. Leonard (2002). Reflection on Rules in Science: An Invisible-Hand Perspective. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (2):141-168.
    Can successful science accommodate a realistic view of scientific motivation? The Received View in theory of science has a theory of scientific success but no theory of scientific motivation. Critical Science Studies has a theory of scientific motivation but denies any prospect for (epistemologically meaningful) scientific success. Neither can answer the question because both regard the question as immaterial. Arguing from the premise that an adequate theory of science needs both a theory of scientific motivation, and a theory of scientific (...)
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  14. Alistair M. Macleod (2007). Invisible Hand Arguments: Milton Friedman and Adam Smith. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 5 (2):103-117.
    The version of the invisible hand argument in Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments differs in important respects from the version in The Wealth of Nations. Both are different, in turn, from the version invoked by Milton Friedman in Free to Choose. However, all three have a common structure. Attention to this structure can help sharpen our sense of their essential thrust by highlighting the questions (about the nature of economic motivation, the structure of markets, and conceptions of the public (...)
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  15. Charles Sayward (1989). Is Any Economic System Unjust? Southwest Philosophy Review 5 (2):17-23.
    The morality of an economic system characterized as an Adam Smith type system is compared with one characterized by central planning. A prima facie case is made that, while the latter has attributes that satisfy a necessary condition for having moral attributes, the former does not and, as a result, has no moral attributes. But then a deeper look at the situation reveals that the directed systems really do not satisfy the necessary condition either. Both the directed and undirected systems (...)
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  16. Scott Scheall, Hayek's Epistemic Theory of Industrial Fluctuations.
    F.A. Hayek essentially quit economic theory and gave up the phenomena of industrial fluctuations as an explicit object of theoretical investigation following the publication of his last work in technical economics, 1941’s The Pure Theory of Capital. Nonetheless, several of Hayek’s more methodologically-oriented writings bear important implications for economic phenomena, especially those of industrial fluctuations. Decisions (usually, for Hayek, of a political nature) taken on the basis of a “pretence” of knowledge impede the operation of the price system’s belief-coordinating function (...)
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  17. Adam Smith (1976 (1776)). An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (Ed. R.H. Campbell, A.S. Skinner, and W. B. Todd). Oxford University Press.
    D. D. Raphael and A. L. Macfie (1976) II An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, ed. R. H. Campbell and A. S. Skinner; textual editor W. B. Todd, 2 vols. (1976) III Essays on Philosophical Subjects, ed. W. P. D. Wightman  ...
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  18. Craig Smith (2006). Adam Smith's Political Philosophy: The Invisible Hand and Spontaneous Order. Routledge.
    When Adam Smith published his celebrated writings on economics and moral philosophy he famously referred to the operation of an invisible hand. Adam Smith's Political Philosophy makes visible the invisible hand by examining its significance in Smith's political philosophy and relating it to similar concepts used by other philosophers, revealing a distinctive approach to social theory that stresses the significance of the unintended consequences of human action. This book introduces greater conceptual clarity to the discussion of the invisible hand and (...)
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  19. Shannon Stimson (2004). From Invisible Hand to Moral Restraint: The Transformation of the Market Mechanism From Adam Smith to Thomas Robert Malthus. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 2 (1):22-47.
  20. Edna Ullmann-Margalit (1978). Invisible-Hand Explanations. Synthese 39 (2):263 - 291.
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  21. Jack Russell Weinstein, The Invisible Hand of Rationality: On the Intersection of Adam Smith and Alasdair MacIntyre.
    The connection between Adam Smith and Alasdair MacIntyre is not evident at first glance. In fact, those who know MacIntyre’s work might bristle at the association. MacIntyre is inherently anticapitalist. He believes that moral people ought to reject the modern state and large-scale corporations.1 He also rejects what he terms the enlightenment project, claiming not only that it failed but that it was doomed to do so.2 Furthermore, MacIntyre’s perspectivalism seems to run counter to any “impartial spectator” theory such (...)
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  22. Petri Ylikoski (1995). The Invisible Hand and Science. Science Studies 8 (2):32-43.