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  1. Jair Minoro Abe (1992). A obra de Newton C.A. Da Costa em Logica. Theoria 7 (1/2/3):347-386.
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  2. Vicente Aboites (2002). Some Remarks About Newton's Demonstrations in Optics: Newton's Missing Experiment. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (3):455-458.
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  3. A. D' Abro (1950). The Evolution of Scientific Thought From Newton to Einstein. [New York]Dover Publications.
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  4. John Aidun (1982). Aristotelian Force as Newtonian Power. Philosophy of Science 49 (2):228-235.
    Aristotle's rule of proportions of the factors of motion, presented in VII 5 of the Physics, characterizes Aristotelian force. Observing that the locomotion to which Aristotle applied the Rule is the motion produced by manual labor, I develop an interpretation of the factors of motion that reveals that Aristotelian force is Newtonian power. An alternate interpretation of the Rule by Toulmin and Goodfield implicitly identifies Aristotelian force with Newtonian force. In order to account for the absence of an acceleration in (...)
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  5. Timo Airaksinen (2010). Berkeley and Newton on Gravity in Siris. In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
  6. James L. Anderson (1990). Newton's First Two Laws Are Not Definitions. American Journal of Physics 58 (12):1192--5.
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  7. Peter R. Anstey (2004). The Methodological Origins of Newton's Queries. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):247-269.
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  8. Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo (forthcoming). Early Modern Experimental Philosophy. In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell.
    In the mid-seventeenth century a movement of self-styled experimental philosophers emerged in Britain. Originating in the discipline of natural philosophy amongst Fellows of the fledgling Royal Society of London, it soon spread to medicine and by the eighteenth century had impacted moral and political philosophy and even aesthetics. Early modern experimental philosophers gave epistemic priority to observation and experiment over theorising and speculation. They decried the use of hypotheses and system-building without recourse to experiment and, in some quarters, developed a (...)
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  9. Richard Arthur, Leery Bedfellows: Newton and Leibniz on the Status of Infinitesimals.
    Newton and Leibniz had profound disagreements concerning metaphysics and the relationship of mathematics to natural philosophy, as well as deeply opposed attitudes towards analysis. Nevertheless, or so I shall argue, despite these deeply held and distracting differences in their background assumptions and metaphysical views, there was a considerable consilience in their positions on the status of infinitesimals. In this paper I compare the foundation Newton provides in his Method Of First and Ultimate Ratios (sketched at some time between 1671 and (...)
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  10. Richard Arthur (1994). Space and Relativity in Newton and Leibniz. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (1):219-240.
    In this paper I challenge the usual interpretations of Newton's and Leibniz's views on the nature of space and the relativity of motion. Newton's ‘relative space’ is not a reference frame; and Leibniz did not regard space as defined with respect to actual enduring bodies. Newton did not subscribe to the relativity of intertial motions; whereas Leibniz believed no body to be at rest, and Newton's absolute motion to be a useful fiction. A more accurate rendering of the opposition between (...)
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  11. Richard T. W. Arthur (1995). Newton's Fluxions and Equably Flowing Time. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (2):323-351.
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  12. Brian S. Baigrie (1987). Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion, Before and After Newton's Principia: An Essay on the Transformation of Scientific Problems. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (2):177-208.
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  13. William M. Baum & Suzanne H. Mitchell (2000). Newton and Darwin: Can This Marriage Be Saved? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):91-92.
    The insights described by Nevin & Grace may be summarized without reference to the Newtonian concepts they suggest. The metaphor to Newtonian mechanics seems dubious in three ways: (1) extensions seem to lead to paradoxes; (2) many well-known phenomena are ignored; (3) the Newtonian concepts seem difficult to reconcile with the larger framework of evolutionary theory.
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  14. Ori Belkind (2013). Leibniz and Newton on Space. Foundations of Science 18 (3):467-497.
    This paper reexamines the historical debate between Leibniz and Newton on the nature of space. According to the traditional reading, Leibniz (in his correspondence with Clarke) produced metaphysical arguments (relying on the Principle of Sufficient Reason and the Principle of Identity of Indiscernibles) in favor of a relational account of space. Newton, according to the traditional account, refuted the metaphysical arguments with the help of an empirical argument based on the bucket experiment. The paper claims that Leibniz’s and Newton’s arguments (...)
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  15. Martin Bell (1997). Hume and Causal Power: The Influences of Malebranche and Newton. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (1):67 – 86.
  16. Delphine Bellis (2013). Review of Carlo Borghero Les Cartésiens Face À Newton. [REVIEW] Hopos 3 (2).
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  17. D. Bertoloni Meli (1991). Public Claims, Private Worries: Newton's Principia and Leibniz's Theory of Planetary Motion. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (3):415-449.
  18. A. E. Best (1968). Theories of Light From Descartes to Newton. By A. I. Sabra. (Oldbourne, 1967. Pp. 363. Price 70s.). Philosophy 43 (165):291-.
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  19. Akeel Bilgrami (2010). Gandhi, Newton, and the Enlightenment. In Aakash Singh & Silika Mohapatra (eds.), Indian Political Thought: A Reader. Routledge.
  20. Katherine A. Brading & Dana Jalobeanu, All Alone in the Universe: Individuals in Descartes and Newton.
    In this paper we argue that the primary issue in Descartes’ Principles of Philosophy, Part II, articles 1-40, is the problem of individuating bodies. We demonstrate that Descartes departs from the traditional quest for a principle of individuation, moving to a different strategy with the more modest aim of constructing bodies adequate to the needs of his cosmology. In doing this he meets with a series of difficulties, and this is precisely the challenge that Newton took up. We show that (...)
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  21. Stuart C. Brown (ed.) (1996). British Philosophy and the Age of Enlightenment. Routledge.
    European philosophy from the late seventeenth century through most of the eighteenth is broadly conceived as the "Enlightenment," a period of empricist reaction to the great seventeeth century Rationalists. This volume begins with Herbert of Cherbury and the Cambridge Platonists and with Newton and the early English Enlightenment. Locke is a key figure, as a result of his importance both in the development of British and Irish philosophy and because of his seminal influence in the Enlightenment as a whole. British (...)
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  22. James E. Broyles (1981). Talk About Space: Wittgenstein and Newton. Philosophical Investigations 4 (4):45-55.
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  23. Henry R. Burke (1936). Sir Isaac Newton's Formal Conception of Scientific Method. New Scholasticism 10 (2):93-115.
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  24. E. A. Burtt (1943). Method and Metaphysics in Sir Isaac Newton. Philosophy of Science 10 (2):57-66.
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  25. Verônica Calazans (2013). A negação do vazio por parte de Descartes: as críticas de Newton e Voltaire. Doispontos 9 (3).
    As críticas de Newton e Voltaire endereçadas à negação do vazio por parte de Descartes compartilham uma estrutura básica: ambos parecem concordar que tal tese cartesiana conduz a implicações indesejáveis tanto no campo da mecânica, quanto no que diz respeito à teologia. Entretanto, embora Newton admita as implicações teológicas da negação do vazio, elas não constituem o fim último de sua crítica, o que parece ocorrer na crítica de Voltaire. Ao contrário, os argumentos newtonianos para assumir o vazioencontram na mecânica (...)
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  26. Robert Callergård (1999). The Hypothesis of Ether and Reid's Interpretation of Newton's First Rule of Philosophizing. Synthese 120 (1):19-26.
    My object is to question a recurrent claim made to the point that Thomas Reid (1710–1796) was hostile to ether theories and that this hostility had its source in his distinctive interpretation of the first of Newton's regulæ philosophandi. Against this view I will argue that Reid did not have any quarrel at all with unobservable or theoretical entities as such, and that his objections against actual theories concerning ether were scientific rather than philosophical, even when based on Newton's first (...)
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  27. Martin Carrier (1986). Newton's Ideas on the Structure of Matter and Their Impact on Eighteenth-Century Chemistry: Some Historical and Methodological Remarks. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 1 (1):85 – 105.
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  28. Alejandro Cassini (2005). Newton and Leibniz on Non-Substantival Space. Theoria 20 (1):25-43.
    The aim of this paper is to analyze Leibniz and Newton’s conception of space, and to point out where their agreements and disagreements lie with respect to its mode of existence. I shall offer a definite characterization of Leibniz and Newton’s conceptions of space. I will show that, according to their own concepts of substance, both Newtonian and Leibnizian spaces are not substantiva!. The reason of that consists in the fact that space is not capable of action. Moreover, there is (...)
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  29. Alejandro Cassini (2005). Newton and Leibniz on Non-Substantival Space. Theoria 20 (1):25-43.
    The aim of this paper is to analyze Leibniz and Newton’s conception of space, and to point out where their agreements and disagreements lie with respect to its mode of existence. I shall offer a definite characterization of Leibniz and Newton’s conceptions of space. I will show that, according to their own concepts of substance, both Newtonian and Leibnizian spaces are not substantiva!. The reason of that consists in the fact that space is not capable of action. Moreover, there is (...)
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  30. Ernst Cassirer (1943). Newton and Leibniz. Philosophical Review 52 (4):366-391.
  31. John Casti, Anders Karlqvist & Giorgio Israel (1995). Newton to Aristotle, Toward a Theory of Models For Living Systems. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 17 (1):173.
  32. Hiram Caton (1986). Die Philosophie der Neuzeit 2. Von Newton Bis Rousseau. Journal of the History of Philosophy 24 (4):561-562.
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  33. Pravas Jivan Chaudhury (1962). Newton and Hypothesis. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (3):344-353.
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  34. Silvio Seno Chibeni (2013). As posições de Newton, Locke e Berkeley sobre a natureza da gravitação. Scientiae Studia 11 (4):811-839.
    Ao defender, nos Princípios matemáticos de filosofia natural, a existência de uma força de gravitação universal, Newton desencadeou uma onda de dúvidas e objeções filosóficas. Suas próprias declarações sobre a natureza da gravitação não são facilmente interpretáveis como formando um conjunto consistente de opiniões. Por um lado, logo após fornecer as três definições de "quantidades de forças centrípetas" (Defs. 6-8), Newton observa que está tratando tais forças "matematicamente", sem se pronunciar sobre sua realidade física. Mas, por outro lado, no Escólio (...)
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  35. Samuel Clarke (1956). The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence: Together with Extracts From Newton's Principia and Opticks. Barnes & Noble.
    This book presents extracts from Leibniz's letters to Newtonian scientist Samuel Clarke.
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  36. I. Bernard Cohen (1964). “Quantum in Se Est”: Newton, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes & Lucretius. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 38:36-46.
  37. I. Bernard Cohen & George E. Smith (eds.) (2002). The Cambridge Companion to Newton. Cambridge University Press.
    In this volume a team of distinguished contributors examine all the main aspects of Newton s thought, including not only his approach to space, time, mechanics, ...
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  38. Malcolm A. R. Colledge (1979). K. S. Painter: The Water Newton Early Christian Silver. Pp. 48; 11 Text Figures, 16 Plates. London: British Museum Publications, 1977. Paper, £1·50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 29 (01):186-.
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  39. Patrick J. Connolly (forthcoming). Space Before God? A Problem in Newton's Metaphysics. Philosophy:1-24.
    My goal in this paper is to elucidate a problematic feature of Newton's metaphysics of absolute space. Specifically, I argue that Newton's theory has the untenable consequence that God depends on space for His existence and is therefore not an independent entity. I argue for this conclusion in stages. First, I show that Newton believed that space was an entity and that God and space were ontologically distinct entities. Part of this involves arguing that Newton denies that space is a (...)
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  40. Patrick J. Connolly (2014). Newton and God's Sensorium. Intellectual History Review 24 (2):185-201.
    In the Queries to the Latin version of the Opticks Newton claims that space is God’s sensorium. Although these passages are well-known, few commentators have offered interpretations of what Newton might have meant by these cryptic remarks. As is well known, Leibniz was quick to pounce on these passages as evidence that Newton held untenable or nonsensical views in metaphysics and theology. Subsequent commentators have largely agreed. This paper has two goals. The first is to offer a clear interpretation of (...)
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  41. J. M. Cook (1976). Brian Dicks: Rhodes. Pp. 200; 26 Text Figs., 16 Plates. Newton Abbot, David & Charles, 1974. Cloth, £3·75. The Classical Review 26 (02):288-.
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  42. Angela Coventry (2005). A Re-Examination of Hume’s Debt to Newton. Ensaios Sobre Hume.
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  43. A. D'Abro (1927). The Evolution of Scientific Thought From Newton to Einstein. New York, Boni & Liveright.
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  44. Georges de Bothezat (1936). Back to Newton. London [Etc.]G. E. Stechert.
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  45. Rudolf De Smet & Karin Verelst (2001). Newton's Scholium Generale: The Platonic and Stoic Legacy — Philo, Justus Lipsius and the Cambridge Platonists. History of Science 39 (123):30.
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  46. Tamás Demeter (forthcoming). Post-Mechanical Explanation in the Natural and Moral Sciences: The Language of Nature and Human Nature in David Hume and William Cullen. Jahrbuch für Europäische Wissenschaftskultur.
    It is common wisdom in intellectual history that eighteenth-century science of man evolved under the aegis of Newton. It is also frequently suggested that David Hume, one of the most influential practitioners of this kind of inquiry, aspired to be the Newton of the moral sciences. Usually this goes hand in hand with a more or less explicit reading of Hume’s theory of human nature as written in an idiom of particulate inert matter and active forces acting on it, i.e. (...)
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  47. Tamás Demeter & Gábor Á Zemplén (2010). Being Charitable to Scientific Controversies: On the Demonstrativity of Newton's Experimentum Crucis. The Monist 93 (4):640-656.
    Current philosophical reflections on science have departed from mainstream history of science with respect to both methodology and conclusions. The article investigates how different approaches to reconstructing commitments can explain these differences and facilitate a mutual understanding and communication of these two perspectives on science. Translating the differences into problems pertaining to principles of charity, the paper offers a platform for clarification and resolution of the differences between the two perspectives. The outlined contextual approach occupies a middle ground between mainstream (...)
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  48. Liam P. Dempsey (2014). Newtonian Idealism: Matter, Perception, and the Divine Will. Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (1):86-112.
    This paper investigates Isaac Newton's rather unique account of God's relation to matter. According to this account, corpuscles depend on a substantially omnipresent God endowing quantities of objective space with the qualities of shape, solidity, the unfaltering tendency to move in accord with certain laws, and—significantly—the power to interact with created minds. I argue that there are important similarities and differences between Newton's account of matter and Berkeley's idealism. And while the role played by the divine will might at first (...)
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  49. Liam P. Dempsey (2011). 'A Compound Wholly Mortal' : Locke and Newton on the Metaphysics of (Personal) Immortality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):241-264.
    In this paper I consider a cluster of positions which depart from the immortalist and dualist anthropologies of Rene Descartes and Henry More. In particular, I argue that John Locke and Isaac Newton are attracted to a monistic mind-body metaphysics, which while resisting neat characterization, occupies a conceptual space distinct from the dualism of the immortalists, on the one hand, and thoroughgoing materialism of Thomas Hobbes, on the other. They propound a sort of property monism: mind and body are distinct, (...)
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  50. Liam P. Dempsey (2006). Written in the Flesh: Isaac Newton on the Mind–Body Relation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (3):420-441.
    Isaac Newton’s views on the mind–body relation are of interest not only because of their somewhat unique departure from popular early modern conceptions of mind and its relation to body, but also because of their connections with other aspects of Newton’s thought. In this paper I argue that (1) Newton accepted an interesting sort of mind–body monism, one which defies neat categorization, but which clearly departs from Cartesian substance dualism, and (2) Newton took the power by which we move our (...)
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