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  1. K. A. (1982). J. L. Austin. Review of Metaphysics 35 (4):872-873.
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  2. S. C. A. (1974). Essays on Austin. Review of Metaphysics 28 (1):118-119.
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  3. John E. Atwell (1966). Austin on Incorrigibility. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 27 (December):261-266.
  4. J. Austin (1946). Other Minds. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 20:148-87.
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  5. J. L. Austin (1979). Philosophical Papers. Oxford University Press.
    The late J.L. Austin's influence on contemporary philosophy was substantial during his lifetime, and has grown greatly since his death in 1960. This third edition of Philosophical Papers, the first edition of which was published in 1961, includes all of Austin's published papers (except "Performatif-Constatif") as well as a new essay entitled "The Line and the Cave in Plato's Republic", which has been reconstructed from Austin's notes.
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  6. J. L. Austin (1975). How to Do Things with Words. Clarendon Press.
    For this second edition, the editors have returned to Austin's original lecture notes, amending the printed text where it seemed necessary.
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  7. J. L. Austin (1966). Three Ways of Spilling Ink. Philosophical Review 75 (4):427-440.
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  8. J. L. Austin (1964). A Plea for Excuses. In V. C. Chappell (ed.), Ordinary Language: Essays in Philosophical Method. Dover Publications. 1--30.
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  9. J. L. Austin (1964). Sense And Sensibilia; Reconstructed From The Manuscript Notes By G J Warnock. Oxford University Press.
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  10. J. L. Austin (1962). Sense and Sensibilia. Oxford University Press.
    This book is the one to put into the hands of those who have been over-impressed by Austin's critics....[Warnock's] brilliant editing puts everybody who is concerned with philosophical problems in his debt.
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  11. J. L. Austin (1946). Other minds, part II. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 148:148-187.
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  12. James Austin (1978). Systemic Causation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 9 (2):83-97.
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  13. James W. Austin (1976). Denoting Phrases and Definite Descriptions. Southern Journal of Philosophy 14 (4):393-399.
    Russell's theory of descriptions has recently come under attack as being trivial and circular--Specifically, That it predicates uniqueness of definite descriptions only after identifying those descriptions as phrases analysable via the uniqueness criterion in the first place. It is shown that this criticism is quite off target. The confusion results largely from failure to distinguish the class of denoting phrases from its sub-Set, Definite descriptions. A few reminders are issued in hopes of facilitating the study and teaching of the theory (...)
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  14. John Austin (1966). Law as the Sovereign's Command. In Martin P. Golding (ed.), The Nature of Law. New York, Random House.
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  15. John Austin (1954). The Province of Jurisprudence Determined and the Uses of the Study of Jurisprudence. London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson.
    This edition comprises the full text of Austin's The Province of Jurisprudence Determined, a classic work of moral, political, and legal philosophy, and Austin ...
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  16. Review author[S.]: J. L. Austin (1952). Critical Notice. Mind 61 (243):395-404.
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  17. A. J. Ayer (1967). Has Austin Refuted the Sense-Datum Theory? Synthese 17 (June):117-140.
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  18. M. R. Ayers (1966). Austin on `Could' and `Could Have'. Philosophical Quarterly 16 (63):113-120.
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  19. Isaiah Berlin (ed.) (1973). Essays on J. L. Austin. Oxford,Clarendon Press.
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  20. W. Berriman (1973). Saying and Meaning: A Main Theme in J. L. Austin's Philosophy. By Mats Furberg. Oxford: Basil Blackwell; Toronto: Copp Clark. 1971. Pp. 299. $14.25. [REVIEW] Dialogue 12 (01):159-161.
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  21. Stephen H. Bickham (1975). What is at Issue in the Ayer-Austin Dispute About Sense-Data. Midwestern Journal of Philosophy 1:1-8.
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  22. Brian Bix, John Austin. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  23. William S. Boardman, Austin and the Inferential Account of Perception.
    O SET THE STAGE for the discussion[1], I will rehearse and clarify a well-known dispute between A. J. Ayer and J. L. Austin concerning whether perceptual judgments are inferences. Both in his Sense and Sensibilia[2] and in his "Other Minds,"[3] Austin carefully distinguishes recognizing that p from inferring that p. For the purpose of comparing his position to Ayer's, we might put his basic claim in this way: given the way words such as "recognize" and "infer" are used outside philosophical (...)
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  24. Norman J. P. Brown (1962). Philosophical Papers. By J. L. Austin. Edited by J. O. Urmson and G. J. Warnock. Oxford University Press, 1961, Pp. 242.$ 5.25. [REVIEW] Dialogue 1 (02):205-207.
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  25. Herbert Burhenn (1980). J. L. Austin and the Analysis of Ritual. Philosophical Investigations 3 (3):39-50.
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  26. Stanley Cavell (2000). Beginning to Read Barbara Cassin. Hypatia 15 (4):99-101.
  27. Stanley Cavell (1995). Philosophical Passages: Wittgenstein, Emerson, Austin, Derrida. Blackwell.
    Introduction Cavell's Voices and Derrida's Grammatology The stature of Stanley Cavell is increasingly considered unique among living American philosophers ...
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  28. Stanley Cavell (1965). Austin at Criticism. Philosophical Review 74 (2):204-219.
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  29. T. S. Champlin (1990). J. L. Austin By G. L. Warnock London and New York: Routledge, 1989, I + 165 Pp., £30.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 65 (254):526-.
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  30. E. C. Clark (1883/1980). Practical Jurisprudence: A Comment on Austin. F.B. Rothman.
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  31. J. C. D'Alessio (1972). Austin on Nowell-Smith's Conditional Analyses of `Could Have' and `Can'. Mind 81 (322):260-264.
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  32. M. de Gaynesford (2011). How Not To Do Things With Words: J. L. Austin on Poetry. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (1):31-49.
    If philosophy and poetry are to illuminate each other, we should first understand their tendencies to mutual antipathy. Examining (and, where possible, correcting) mutual misapprehension is part of this task. J. L. Austin's remarks on poetry offer one such point of entry: they are often cited by poets and critics as an example of philosophy's blindness to poetry (I). These remarks are complex and their purpose obscure—more so than those who take exception to them usually allow or admit (II). But (...)
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  33. John A. Dinneen (1972). What Austin Does with Words. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 32 (4):514-523.
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  34. Gerald Doppelt (1979). The Austin-Malcolm Argument for the Incorrigibility of Perceptual Reports. Dialectica 33 (1):59-75.
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  35. Austin Duncan-Jones, C. D. Broad, William Kneale, Martha Kneale, L. J. Russell, D. J. Allan, S. Körner, Percy Black, J. O. Urmson, Stephen Toulmin, J. J. C. Smart, Antony Flew, R. C. Cross, George E. Hughes, John Holloway, D. Daiches Raphael, J. P. Corbett, E. A. Gellner, G. P. Henderson, W. von Leyden, P. L. Heath, Margaret Macdonald, B. Mayo, P. H. Nowell-Smith, J. N. Findlay & A. M. MacIver (1950). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 59 (235):389-431.
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  36. K. T. Fann (1969). Symposium on J. L. Austin. New York, Humanities P..
    J. L. Austin (1911-1960) exercised in Post-war Oxford an intellectual authority similar to that of Wittgenstein in Cambridge. Although he completed no books of his own and published only seven papers, Austin became through lectures and talks one of the acknowledged leaders in what is called ‘Oxford philosophy’ or ‘ordinary language philosophy’. Few would dispute that among analytic philosophers Austin stands out as a great and original philosophical genius. Three volumes of his writing, published after his death, have become classics (...)
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  37. Roderick Firth (1964). Austin and the Argument From Illusion. Philosophical Review 73 (July):372-382.
    Firth argues that austin's criticisms of the argument from illusion do not destroy the argument. We can reformulate it in two ways so that it succeeds as a method of ostensibly defining terms denoting the sensory constituent of perceptual experience. One way maintains the act-Object distinction of the cartesian tradition and the other uses the language of "looks." (staff).
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  38. Eugen Fischer (2014). Verbal Fallacies and Philosophical Intuitions: The Continuing Relevance of Ordinary Language Analysis. In Brian Garvey (ed.), Austin on Language. Palgrave Macmillan. 124-140.
    The paper builds on a methodological idea from experimental philosophy and on findings from psycholinguistics, to develop and defend ordinary language analysis (OLA) as practiced in J.L. Austin’s Sense and Sensibilia. That attack on sense-datum theories of perception focuses on the argument from illusion. Through a case-study on this paradoxical argument, the present paper argues for a form of OLA which is psychologically informed, seeks to expose epistemic, rather than semantic, defects in paradoxical arguments, and is immune to the main (...)
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  39. Eugen Fischer (2005). Austin on Sense-Data: Ordinary Language Analysis as 'Therapy'. Grazer Philosophische Studien 70 (1):67-99.
    The construction and analysis of arguments supposedly are a philosopher's main business, the demonstration of truth or refutation of falsehood his principal aim. In Sense and Sensibilia, J.L. Austin does something entirely different: He discusses the sense-datum doctrine of perception, with the aim not of refuting it but of 'dissolving' the 'philosophical worry' it induces in its champions. To this end, he 'exposes' their 'concealed motives', without addressing their stated reasons. The paper explains where and why this at first sight (...)
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  40. Mats Furberg (1971). Saying and Meaning: A Main Theme in J. L. Austin's Philosophy. Oxford,Blackwell.
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  41. Richard T. Garner (1968). Utterances and Acts in the Philosophy of J. L. Austin. Noûs 2 (3):209-227.
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  42. Richard T. Garner (1968). Austin on Entailment. Philosophical Quarterly 18 (72):216-224.
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  43. Bryant G. Garth & Austin Sarat (eds.) (1998). How Does Law Matter? American Bar Foundation.
    The essays in this collection show how law is relevant in both an "instrumental" and a "constitutive" sense, as a tool to accomplish particular purposes and as ...
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  44. Bryant G. Garth & Austin Sarat (eds.) (1998). Justice and Power in Sociolegal Studies. American Bar Foundation.
  45. D. Gerber (1969). A Note on Woody on Dewey on Austin. Ethics 79 (4):303-308.
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  46. Simon Glendinning (2000). Inheriting 'Philosophy': The Case of Austin and Derrida Revisited. Ratio 13 (4):307–331.
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  47. Keith Graham (1981). A Note on Reading Austin. Synthese 46 (1):143 - 147.
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  48. Keith Graham (1977). J. L. Austin: A Critique of Ordinary Language Philosophy. Harvester Press.
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  49. Stuart Hampshire (1965). J. L. Austin and Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy 62 (19):511-513.
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  50. Nat Hansen (2014). Review of When Words Are Called For: A Defense of Ordinary Language Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):179-181.
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