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  1. Alexander Bennett (2009). Bushi No Etosu to Sono Ayumi: Bushidō No Shakai Shisōshiteki Kōsatsu. Shibunkaku Shuppan.
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  2. Wanda A. Bieda (1978). Sekimon Shingaku. Dept. Of Japanese, University of Queensland.
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  3. Gerhard Bierwirth (2005). Bushidō: Der Weg des Kriegers Ist Ambivalent: Ein Essay. Iudicium.
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  4. Catharina Blomberg (1994). The Heart of the Warrior: Origins and Religious Background of the Samurai System in Feudal Japan. Japan Library.
    Traces the development of the samurai, both in the way they regarded themselves and their role in society.
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  5. W. A. Borody (2013). The Japanese Roboticist Masahiro Mori’s Buddhist Inspired Concept of “The Uncanny Valley". Journal of Evolution and Technology 23 (1):31-44.
    In 1970, the Japanese roboticist and practicing Buddhist Masahiro Mori wrote a short essay entitled “On the Uncanny Valley” for the journal Energy . Since the publication of this two-page essay, Mori’s concept of the Uncanny Valley has become part and parcel of the discourse within the fields of humanoid robotics engineering, the film industry, culture studies, and philosophy, most notably the philosophy of transhumanism. In this paper, the concept of the Uncanny Valley is discussed in terms of the contemporary (...)
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  6. Thomas F. Cleary (ed.) (2008). Training the Samurai Mind: A Bushido Sourcebook. Distributed in the United States by Random House, Inc..
    Honor, fearlessness, calm, decisive action, strategic thinking, and martial prowess have been the hallmarks of the Japanese samurai culture through the ages. Their ethos is known as bushido, or the way of the warrior-knight. Here is an insider’s view of the samurai—their moral and psychological development, the ethical standards they strive to uphold, their training in both martial arts and strategy, and the enormous role that the traditions of Shintoism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism had in influencing their ideals. Thomas Cleary (...)
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  7. Yūzan Daidōji (2007). Daidōji Yūzan's Code of the Samurai: A Contemporary Dual-Language Edition of the Budō Shoshinshū. Ulysses.
    For almost 700 years shoguns ruled Japan. These "gentleman warriors" developed a dedicated system of honor and strict guidlelines of behavior that Taira Shigesuke first brought together in his 16th century book—Bushido Shoshinshu. Present to a modern audience in clear, easy-to-read English, this new translation captures the majesty of the higher principles as well as the usefulness of the daily advice. From principles such as "a samurai should keep foremost in his mind the fact that he must die" to rules (...)
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  8. Yūzan Daidōji (1999). Code of the Samurai: A Modern Translation of the Bushidō Shoshinshū. Tuttle Pub..
    The Code of the Samurai is a four-hundred-year-old explication of the rules and expectations embodied in Bushido, the Japanese way of the warrior. Bushido has played a major role in shaping the behavior of modern Japanese government, corporations, society.
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  9. Yūzan Daidōji (1941/1995). The Code of the Samurai. C.E. Tuttle.
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  10. Susumu Furuta (1975). Ningen Shikan Gaisetsu.
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  11. Yutaka Hibino (1928/1979). Nippon Shindo Ron: Or, the National Ideals of the Japanese People. Hyperion Press.
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  12. Chikurō Hiroike (2002). Towards Supreme Morality: An Attempt to Establish the New Science of Moralogy. Institute of Moralogy.
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  13. Sazō Idemitsu (1972). Dotoku of Japan Differs Fundamentally From Western Morals. Office of the Founder's Staff, Idemitsu Kosan Co..
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  14. Jun Imai & Shinkō Yamamoto (eds.) (2006). Sekimon Shingaku No Shisō. Perikansha.
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  15. Nobumichi Iwasa & Haruo Kitagawa (eds.) (2011). Hiroike Chikurō No Shisō to Gyōseki: Morarojī E No Sekai No Hyōka: 2009-Nen Moraru Saiensu Kokusai Kaigi Hōkoku = Second International Conference on Moral Science: Ethical Theory and Moral Practice: Evaluating Chikuro Hiroikeʼs Work in Moralogy. [REVIEW] Hatsubai Hiroike Gakuen Jigyōbu.
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  16. Kakumyō Kanno (2004). Bushidō No Gyakushū. Kōdansha.
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  17. L. B. Karelova (2007). Uchenie Isidy Baĭgana o Postizhenii "Serdt͡sa" I Stanovlenie Trudovoĭ Ėtiki V I͡aponii: Besedy Gorozhanina I Seli͡aina, Rassuzhdenii͡a o Berezhlivom Upravlenii Domom: Issledovanii͡a, Perevod I Kommentarii. "Vostochnai͡a Literatura" Ran.
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  18. L. B. Karelova (2007). U Istokov I͡aponskoĭ Trudovoĭ Ėtiki: Istorii͡a V Portretakh.
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  19. Kazuhiko Kasaya (2005). Bushidō to Nihon-Gata Nōryoku Shugi. Shinchōsha.
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  20. Teiji Kenjō (2009). Kindai Hōtoku Shisō to Nihon Shakai. Perikansha.
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  21. Rihito Kimura (1996). Death and Dying in Japan. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (4):374-378.
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  22. Yūkō Kitakage (2011). Bushidō No Bigaku. Bensei Shuppan.
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  23. Hideo Koga & Stacey B. Day (eds.) (1993). Hagakure, Spirit of Bushido =. Kyūshū Daigaku Shuppankai.
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  24. Tetsuya Kōno (2011). Dōtoku o Toinaosu: Riberarizumu to Kyōiku No Yukue. Chikuma Shobō.
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  25. Kunizō Koyama & Kōhei Yoshida (eds.) (2007). Nakae Tōju Shingakuha Zenshū. Kenbun Shuppan.
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  26. William R. LaFleur (2008). Enhancement and Desire: Japanese Qualms About Where Biotechnology is Taking Us. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (1):65-72.
    Japan's Buddhists view bodily enhancement neither negatively in terms of sin nor positively as repairing the world. They prefer prudence, however, due to the fact that human desires will be enflamed by proffered new biotechnologies and ironically increase psychosocial dissatisfaction. In spite of great pressures for bodily enhancements within in East Asian societies, bioethicists issue strong cautions.
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  27. Teng-hui Lee (2004). Wu Shi Dao Jie Ti: Zuo Ren de Gen Ben. Qian Wei Chu Ban She.
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  28. Yukio Mishima (1977/1983). The Way of the Samurai: Yukio Mishima on Hagakure in Modern Life. Putnam.
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  29. Masako Miyagawa (2010). Nihon No Seishin Bunka =. Bungeisha.
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  30. Masako Miyagawa (2008). Nihon No Seishin Bunka: Bushidō. Kaisei Shuppan.
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  31. Masahiro Morioka (2013). How a Japanese Philosopher Encountered Bioethics. In Frank Rövekamp & Friederike Bosse (eds.), Ethics in Science and Society: German and Japanese Views. IUDICIUM Verlag GmbH 27-41.
    In this essay I will illustrate how a Japanese philosopher reacted to a newly imported discipline, “bioethics,” in the 1980s and then tried to create an alternative way of looking at “life” in the field of philosophy. This essay might serve as an interesting case study in which a contemporary “western” way of thinking succeeded in capturing, but finally failed to persuade, a then-young Japanese researcher’s mind.
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  32. Masahiro Morioka (2013). A Phenomenological Study of “Herbivore Men”. The Review of Life Studies 4:1-20.
    From 2008 to 2009, “herbivore men (sôshoku danshi or sôshoku-kei danshi in Japanese)” became a trendy, widely used term in Japanese. It flourished in all sorts of media, including TV, the Internet, newspapers and magazines, and could even occasionally be heard in everyday conversation. As it became more popular its original meaning was diversified, and people began to use it with a variety of different nuances. In December of 2009 it made the top ten list of nominees for the “Buzzword (...)
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  33. Masahiro Morioka (2012). The Concept of Life in Contemporary Japan. The Review of Life Studies 2:23-62.
    The objective of this paper is to contribute to the international discussions on life and scientific technology by examining the images and concepts of life in contemporary Japan. In English the word Inochi can be rendered as "life". However, the nuances of the Japanese term differ in certain cases, and therefore I have chosen to use the term much as is. I first discuss the linguistic meanings of the word, and then consider several important features of the images of inochi (...)
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  34. Masahiro Morioka (2006). The Ethics of Human Cloning and the Sprout of Human Life. In Heiner Roetz (ed.), Cross-Cultural Issues in Bioethics: The Example of Human Cloning. Rodopi 1-16.
    Abstract -/- In 1998, the Council for Science and Technology established the Bioethics Committee and asked its members to examine the ethical and legal aspects of human cloning. The Committee concluded in 1999 that human cloning should be prohibited, and, based on the report, the government presented a bill for the regulation of human cloning in 2000. After a debate in the Diet, the original bill was slightly modified and issued on December 6, 2000. In this paper, I take a (...)
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  35. Masahiro Morioka (2004). Current Debate on the Ethical Issues of Brain Death. Proceedings of International Congress on Ethical Issues in Brain Death and Organ Transplantation:57-59.
    The philosophy of our proposal are as follows: (1) Various ideas of life and death, including that of objecting to brain death as human death, should be guaranteed. We would like to maintain the idea of pluralism of human death; and (2) We should respect a child’s view of life and death. We should provide him/her with an opportunity to think and express their own ideas about life and death.
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  36. Masahiro Morioka (1989). Brain Death as a Form of Human Relationships: Brain Dead Person Chapter. Hozokan.
    This book shifted the Japanese debate on brain death from "brain-centered analysis" to "human relationship oriented analysis." I defined that brain death means a form of human relationships between a comatose patient and the people surrounding him/her in the ICU. I paid special attention to the emotional aspect and the inner reality of the family members of a brain dead person, because sometimes the family members at the bedside, touching the warm body of the patient, express the feeling that the (...)
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  37. Yūzaburō Motohashi (1985). Nihonjin No Rinrikan Ni Tsuite. Nihon Shigaku Kyōiku Kenkyūjo.
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  38. Nobuhisa Namimatsu (2010). Hōtoku Shisō to Kindai Kyōto. Shōwadō.
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  39. Slobodan Nenin (2005). Duh Samuraja: Bušido Kodeks. Stylos.
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  40. Sontoku Ninomiya (1937/1970). Sage Ninomiya's Evening Talks. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.
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  41. Yasuhiro Ninomiya (2008). Nikki Shokan Shihōsho Chosaku Kara Mita Ninomiya Kinjirō No Jinsei to Shisō. Hatsubaijo Hiroike Gakuen Jigyōbu.
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  42. Inazō Nitobe (1906/2004). Bushido: Samurai Ethics and the Soul of Japan. Dover Publications.
    At the turn of the 20th century, when Japan was evolving from an isolated feudal society into a modern nation, a Japanese educator wrote this book to introduce the rest of the world to his society's traditional values. Author Inazo Nitobe defines bushido, the way of the warrior, as the source of the virtues most admired by his people. In this eloquent work, he takes an eclectic and far-reaching approach, drawing examples from indigenous traditions--Buddhism, Shintoism, Confucianism, and the centuries-old philosophies (...)
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  43. Inazō Nitobe (1905/2005). Bushido: The Spirit of the Samurai. Shambhala.
    First published in 1900, Bushido is the work of a Japanese scholar and educator--and a Quaker--writing in English for a Western audience to explain the virtues most admired by the Japanese: rectitude, courage, benevolence, politeness, sincerity, honor, loyalty, and self-control. The author's approach is twofold. First, he delves into Japan's ancient traditions of Buddhism, Shintoism, and Confucianism, and the moral guidelines handed down over hundreds of years by Japan's samurai and sages. Then, he compares and contrasts Japanese tradition with Western (...)
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  44. Sakuun Ogasawara (2007). Shoka Hyōjō: Sengoku Bushi No "Bushidō". Shin Jinbutsu Ōraisha.
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  45. Saeki, Ariyoshi & [From Old Catalog] (1942). Bushidō Zensho. 17-18 I.E..
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  46. Takamori Saigō & Tadayoshi Shimazu (eds.) (2011). Satsuma Bushidō. Nihon Keizai Shinbun Shuppansha Nikkei Jigyō Shuppan Sentā.
    Dai 1-bu. Nanshū-ō ikun -- dai 2-bu. Jisshin-kō Iroha uta -- part I. The instructions of Saigō Nanshū -- part II. The Iroha verses of Shimazu Jisshinkō.
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  47. Hiroaki Sato (1995). Legends of the Samurai. Overlook Press.
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  48. Sumiko Sekiguchi (2007). Kokumin Dōtoku to Jendā: Fukuzawa Yukichi, Inoue Tetsujirō, Watsuji Tetsurō. Tōkyō Daigaku Shuppankai.
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  49. Takeshi Takagi (1984). A Comparison of Bushi-Do & Chivalry, 1914. Tm International Academy.
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  50. Fumihiro Takahashi (2012). Kindai Nihon No Rinri Shisō: Shujū Dōtoku to Kokka. Shibunkaku Shuppan.
    Dai 1-bu. Kindai no tachiage : chishikijintachi -- dai 2-bu. Kindai no katarinaoshi : Watsuji Tetsurō -- dai 3-bu. Nishimura Shigeki bunken kaidai.
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