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  1. Masao Abe (1995). The Problem of “Inverse Correspondence” in the Philosophy of Nishida. International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (4):419-436.
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  2. Masao Abe (1992). “Inverse Correspondence” in the Philosophy of Nishida. International Philosophical Quarterly 32 (3):325-344.
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  3. Masao Abe (1988). Nishida's Philosophy of “Place”. International Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):355-371.
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  4. Masao Abe & James L. Fredericks (1999). The Problem of Inverse Correspondence in the Philosophy of Nishida: Comparing Nishida with Tanabe. International Philosophical Quarterly 39 (153):59-76.
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  5. Victoria Floyer Acland (1992). A British View of the Japanese Book Scene. Logos 3 (4):192-195.
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  6. Takao Aeba (1985). Keiken to Choetsu Nihon "Kindai" No Shiko. Ozawa Shoten.
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  7. Kelly Louise Rexzy P. Agra (2013). An Inquiry Into the Historical Development of Philosophy in Japan. Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 17 (2):27-59.
    What is Japanese philosophy? This paper will address this question, not by giving a survey of the works of Japanese philosophers or a definition of the subject matter of Japanese philosophy, but by attempting to present how it emerged as a distinct philosophical tradition—by sketching the controversies that gave rise to its formation; the social, intellectual, and historical factors that paved the way to its development; and the revolution of thought which finally gave it the title “Japanese philosophy.” I will (...)
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  8. Ryåomin Akizuki (1996). Zettaimu to Basho Suzuki Zengaku to Nishida Tetsugaku.
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  9. Barbara Ambros & Duncan Williams (2001). Local Religion in Tokugawa History: Editors' Introduction. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 28 (3/4):209-225.
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  10. Rea Amit (2012). On the Structure of Contemporary Japanese Aesthetics. Philosophy East and West 62 (2):174-185.
    The jargon of Japanese art criticism has always had an abundance of unique terms, categories, and concepts. This is not only true when discussing traditional Japan, since there are just as many new terms today as there were in the past. Some of the new terms have developed or evolved from old ones, while others have appeared with no seeming connection to any traditional tendency. Yet, only a few of these terms can be considered for the meta-level discussion of Aesthetics, (...)
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  11. Hideo Ando (1969). Meiji Ishin No Genryu. Kinokuniya.
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  12. Reiji Andō (2010). Basho to Musubi: Kindai Nihon Shisōshi. Kōdansha.
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  13. Shōeki Andō (1992). The Animal Court: A Political Fable From Old Japan. Weatherhill.
  14. Shoeki Ando & Ando Shoeki Kenkyukai (1983). Ando Shoeki Zenshu. Nosan Gyoson Bunka Kyokai.
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  15. Shoeki Ando & Masahiko Miyake (1981). Ando Shoeki Zenshu.
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  16. Shoeki Ando & Tatsuya Naramoto (1966). Todo Shinden. Iwanami Shoten.
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  17. Takatsura Ando (1966). Kagakusha to Tetsugakusha No Taiwa. Risosha.
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  18. Anesaki (1906). Professor Carpenter on Japanese Buddhism. Hibbert Journal 5:184.
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  19. M. Anesaki (1905). How Christianity Appeals To A Japanese Buddhist. Hibbert Journal 4 (1):1-3.
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  20. Rachel A. Ankeny, M. L. S. Bette Anton, Ana Borovecki, Alister Browne, Debora Diniz, Elisa J. Gordon, Matti Häyry & Steve Heilig (2004). Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Professor at the School of Public Health, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:215-217.
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  21. Rachel A. Ankeny, M. L. S. Bette Anton, Alister Browne, Nuket Buken, Murat Civaner, Arthur R. Derse, Brent Dickson, Dan Eastwood, Todd Gilmer & Michael L. Gross (2003). Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing at the University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Professor at the School of Public Health, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12:229-231.
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  22. Olivier Ansart (2012). The Happiness of the Wicked: How Tokugawa Thinkers Dealt with the Problem. Asian Philosophy 22 (2):161-175.
    Phenomena like the happiness of the wicked or the misfortune of the worthies were for Confucian thinkers, just as for Christian theologians, puzzles that their ?theories on fortune and misfortune?, just like Theodicies in the West, were trying, with some difficulty, to explain or rationalize. This article first surveys some standard explanations of the phenomena given by scholars of eighteenth-century Japan within the framework of the available monist, rationalist paradigms. Afterward, it turns to another type of representation of the world (...)
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  23. Olivier Ansart (2009). Making Sense of Sorai: How to Deal with the Contradictions in Ogy Sorai's Political Theory. Asian Philosophy 19 (1):11 – 30.
    To understand the political theory—and especially its alleged modernity—of Ogyumacr Sorai, one of the most important philosophers of Tokugawa Japan, we need to understand the pivotal role that heaven, gods and spirits play in this theory. This is no easy task. This article will start with an analysis of the reasons of this difficulty: the numerous tensions and contradictions found in Sorai's remarks on the subject. Refusing to ignore one side of the story, refusing (...)
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  24. Olivier Ansart (2006). Kaiho Seiry on 'What It is to Be a Human Being'. Asian Philosophy 16 (1):65 – 86.
    Kaiho Seiry (1755-1817) is probably the first Japanese thinker to proclaim the contractual nature of human relationships. I examine in this paper the view of human beings that led him to this conclusion. Giving up previous definitions of humans, Seiry focuses on the faculty of practical reason. While this leads him to recognize a hierarchy of humans, some having more humanity than others, it also allows him to develop the most modern understanding of social relationship available in his time. His (...)
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  25. Ryåosuke åohashi (2004). Kyåoto Gakuha No Shisåo Shuju No Zåo to Shisåo No Potensharu.
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  26. Ryåosuke åohashi (1998). Hi No Genshåoron Josetsu Nihon Tetsugaku No Roku Tåeze Yori. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  27. Hitoshi åokuwa (1989). Nihon Kinsei No Shisåo to Bukkyåo.
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  28. Jun®Ichi Åono (1998). Shi to Shi to Jitsuzon Nihon Bungei Shisåoshi Kenkyåu. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  29. Seikyåu åota (1989). Chåugoku Shåochåo Shigaku to Shite No Shin®Insetsu No Hatten, Kokugaku Kåoki No Haikei to Shite No Kinsei Nihon Jugaku.
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  30. Masaru åotani & Toshikazu åoya (1992). Kyerukegåoru to Nihon No Bukkyåo, Tetsugaku.
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  31. Daisuke Araya (2008). Nishida Kitarō: Rekishi No Ronrigaku. Kōdansha.
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  32. Leonardo V. Arena (2008). Lo Spirito Del Giappone: La Filosofia Del Sol Levante Dalle Origini Ai Giorni Nostri. Bur.
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  33. Takuya Arima (2007). Kinsei Awa Kangaku Shi No Kenkyū Kogakusha Takahashi Sekisui. Chūgoku Shoten.
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  34. Yoko Arisaka, Beyond “East and West”: Nishida's Universalism and Postcolonial Critique.
    During the 1930s and 1940s, many Japanese intellectuals resisted Western cultural imperialism. This theoretical movement was unfortunately complicit with wartime nationalism. Kitaro Nishida, the founder of modern Japanese philosophy and the leading figure of the Kyoto School, has been the focus of a controversy as to whether his philosophy was inherently nationalist or not. Nishida’s defenders claim that his philosophical “universalism” was incompatible with the particularistic nationalism of Japan’s imperialist state. From the standpoint of postcolonial critique, I argue that this (...)
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  35. Yoko Arisaka (2014). Modern Japanese Philosophy: Historical Contexts and Cultural Implications. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:3-25.
    The paper provides an overview of the rise of Japanese philosophy during the period of rapid modernization in Japan after the Meiji Restoration (beginning in the 1860s). It also examines the controversy surrounding Japanese philosophy towards the end of the Pacific War (1945), and its renewal in the contemporary context. The post-Meiji thinkers engaged themselves with the questions of universality and particularity; the former represented science, medicine, technology, and philosophy (understood as ) and the latter, the Japanese non-Western tradition. Within (...)
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  36. Yoko Arisaka (1996). Space and History: Philosophy and Imperialism in Nishida and Watsuji. Dissertation, University of California, Riverside
    This dissertation analyzes the philosophical theories and politics of Kitaro Nishida , the founder of modern Japanese philosophy, and Tetsuro Watsuji , the second most famous philosopher in Japan. Both Nishida and Watsuji develop a "spatialized" conception of history to contrast with a temporal model which had the effect of situating Europe as the most advanced form of modern culture. According to their view, the representation of world history should take into account the contemporaneous developments of all cultures. ;Positioning themselves (...)
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  37. Yoko Arisaka (1990). Experiential Ontology. International Philosophical Quarterly 30 (2):173-205.
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  38. Johann P. Arnason (1987). The Modern Constellation and the Japanese Enigma PART I 1. Western Projections and Japanese Responses. Thesis Eleven 17 (1):4-39.
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  39. Shigenori Asai & Kazuo Sekiguchi (1995). Ningen No Rinen to Seiji Tetsugaku Tetsugaku, Rinrigaku, Kyoiku Genri, Dotoku Kyoiku No Kenkyu, Seiji Shisoshi to Ronshu. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  40. Shigenori Asai, Akira Takashima & Takashi Saitåo (1993). Jinrin to Aichi Rinrigaku, Tetsugaku, Ronrigaku, Kyåoikugaku Tåo Ronshåu. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  41. Tomomi Asakura (2015). Theory of Personhood in Nishida Kitarō and Mou Zongsan: Reflections on Critical Buddhism's View of the Kyoto School. Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 12 (1):41-63.
    This paper attempts to interpret the theory of personhood in the works of Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945) in a way that refutes a certain type of Nishida interpretation that Critical Buddhism offers. According to this type of interpretation, the logic of basho is a modern version of the Qixinlun system. Based on this interpretation, Critical Buddhism denounces Kyoto School philosophy as "topical Buddhism." This paper shows how Nishida himself consciously differentiates his philosophy from the idealistic and monistic system with which the (...)
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  42. Tomomi Asakura (2014). 'Higashiajia ni tetsugaku wa nai' noka: Kyoto gakuha to Shinjuka (The Problem of East Asian Philosophy: the Kyoto School and New Confucianism). Iwanami Shoten.
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  43. Tomomi Asakura (2014). Philosophy of Doctrinal Classification: Kōyama Iwao and Mou Zongsan. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):453-468.
    Doctrinal classification or the panjiao 判教 system of Chinese Buddhism has been rediscovered and renewed in modern East Asian philosophy since both the Kyoto School and New Confucianism clarified the philosophical meaning of this intellectual tradition. The theoretical relation between these two modern reconsiderations, however, has not yet been studied. I analyze the theory of panjiao in Kōyama Iwao 高山岩男 and Mou Zongsan 牟宗三 so as to identify and extract, despite their apparent irrelevance, the same type of philosophical argument concerning (...)
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  44. Tomomi Asakura (2013). On the Principle of Comparative East Asian Philosophy: Nishida Kitarō and Mou Zongsan. National Central University Journal of Humanities 54:1-25.
    Recent research both on the Kyoto School and on the contemporary New Confucians suggests significant similarities between these two modern East Asian philosophies. Still missing is, however, an explanation of the shared philosophical ideas that serve as the foundation for comparative studies. For this reason, I analyze the basic theories of the two distinctly East Asian philosophies of Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945) and Mou Zongsan (1909-95) so as to identify and extract the same type of argument. This is an alternative to (...)
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  45. Tomomi Asakura (2011). On Buddhistic Ontology: A Comparative Study of Mou Zongsan and Kyoto School Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 61 (4):647-678.
    Mou Zongsan's notion of "Buddhistic ontology" is interpreted here in its fundamental difference from his own previous metaphysical scheme, in the light of the Kyoto School philosophers' similar attempts to resolve the Kantian antinomy of practical reason. This is an alternative both to the analysis provided by previous interpreters of Mou's Buddhistic philosophy, such as Hans-Rudolf Kantor and N. Serina Chan, and to the comparative studies of Mou's theories with Kyoto School philosophy by Ng Yu-kwan. Previous researchers considered Mou's Buddhist (...)
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  46. Hiroshi Asami (2009). Nishida Kitarō: Seimei to Shūkyō Ni Fukamariyuku Shisaku. Shunpūsha.
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  47. Hiroshi Asami (2000). Nishida Kitaråo to Kirisutokyåo No Taiwa. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  48. Makoto Asari (2008). Nihongo to Nihon Shisō: Motoori Norinaga, Nishida Kitarō, Mikami Akira, Karatani Kōjin. Fujiwara Shoten.
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  49. Horo Atsuhiko (1993). Review Of: Himi Kiyoshi, Tanabe Tetsugaku Kenkyū: Shūkyōtetsugaku No Kanten Kara. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 20 (2-3):249-252.
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  50. G. S. Axtell (1991). Comparative Dialectics: Nishida Kitarō's Logic of Place and Western Dialectical Thought. Philosophy East and West 41 (2):163-184.
    Philosophical anthropologist Mircea Eliade once said that "the union of opposites" is a basic category of archaic ontology and comparative world religions. In this paper I develop the theory of contrariety or opposition as a prime focus for East/West comparative philosophy. The paper considers especially Nishida Kitaro's later works and the complex phrase "zettai mujuntekijikodbitsu," variously translated by Schinzinger as "absolute contradictory self-identity," "the self-identity of absolute contradictories," or more simply as "oneness" or "unity" of opposites.
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