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  1. Masao Abe (1995). The Problem of “Inverse Correspondence” in the Philosophy of Nishida. International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (4):419-436.
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  2. Masao Abe (1992). “Inverse Correspondence” in the Philosophy of Nishida. International Philosophical Quarterly 32 (3):325-344.
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  3. Masao Abe (1988). Nishida's Philosophy of “Place”. International Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):355-371.
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  4. Masao Abe & James L. Fredericks (1999). The Problem of Inverse Correspondence in the Philosophy of Nishida: Comparing Nishida with Tanabe. International Philosophical Quarterly 39 (153):59-76.
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  5. Victoria Floyer Acland (1992). A British View of the Japanese Book Scene. Logos 3 (4):192-195.
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  6. Kelly Louise Rexzy P. Agra (2013). An Inquiry Into the Historical Development of Philosophy in Japan. Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 17 (2):27-59.
    What is Japanese philosophy? This paper will address this question, not by giving a survey of the works of Japanese philosophers or a definition of the subject matter of Japanese philosophy, but by attempting to present how it emerged as a distinct philosophical tradition—by sketching the controversies that gave rise to its formation; the social, intellectual, and historical factors that paved the way to its development; and the revolution of thought which finally gave it the title “Japanese philosophy.” I will (...)
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  7. Barbara Ambros & Duncan Williams (2001). Local Religion in Tokugawa History: Editors' Introduction. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 28 (3/4):209-225.
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  8. Rea Amit (2012). On the Structure of Contemporary Japanese Aesthetics. Philosophy East and West 62 (2):174-185.
    The jargon of Japanese art criticism has always had an abundance of unique terms, categories, and concepts. This is not only true when discussing traditional Japan, since there are just as many new terms today as there were in the past. Some of the new terms have developed or evolved from old ones, while others have appeared with no seeming connection to any traditional tendency. Yet, only a few of these terms can be considered for the meta-level discussion of Aesthetics, (...)
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  9. Reiji Andō (2010). Basho to Musubi: Kindai Nihon Shisōshi. Kōdansha.
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  10. Shōeki Andō (1992). The Animal Court: A Political Fable From Old Japan. Weatherhill.
  11. M. Anesaki (1905). How Christianity Appeals To A Japanese Buddhist. Hibbert Journal 4 (1):1-3.
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  12. Rachel A. Ankeny, M. L. S. Bette Anton, Ana Borovecki, Alister Browne, Debora Diniz, Elisa J. Gordon, Matti Häyry & Steve Heilig (2004). Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Professor at the School of Public Health, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13:215-217.
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  13. Rachel A. Ankeny, M. L. S. Bette Anton, Alister Browne, Nuket Buken, Murat Civaner, Arthur R. Derse, Brent Dickson, Dan Eastwood, Todd Gilmer & Michael L. Gross (2003). Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the School of Health Science and Nursing at the University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, and Professor at the School of Public Health, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12:229-231.
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  14. Olivier Ansart (2012). The Happiness of the Wicked: How Tokugawa Thinkers Dealt with the Problem. Asian Philosophy 22 (2):161-175.
    Phenomena like the happiness of the wicked or the misfortune of the worthies were for Confucian thinkers, just as for Christian theologians, puzzles that their ?theories on fortune and misfortune?, just like Theodicies in the West, were trying, with some difficulty, to explain or rationalize. This article first surveys some standard explanations of the phenomena given by scholars of eighteenth-century Japan within the framework of the available monist, rationalist paradigms. Afterward, it turns to another type of representation of the world (...)
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  15. Olivier Ansart (2009). Making Sense of Sorai: How to Deal with the Contradictions in Ogy Sorai's Political Theory. Asian Philosophy 19 (1):11 – 30.
    To understand the political theory—and especially its alleged modernity—of Ogyumacr Sorai, one of the most important philosophers of Tokugawa Japan, we need to understand the pivotal role that heaven, gods and spirits play in this theory. This is no easy task. This article will start with an analysis of the reasons of this difficulty: the numerous tensions and contradictions found in Sorai's remarks on the subject. Refusing to ignore one side of the story, refusing (...)
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  16. Olivier Ansart (2006). Kaiho Seiry on 'What It is to Be a Human Being'. Asian Philosophy 16 (1):65 – 86.
    Kaiho Seiry (1755-1817) is probably the first Japanese thinker to proclaim the contractual nature of human relationships. I examine in this paper the view of human beings that led him to this conclusion. Giving up previous definitions of humans, Seiry focuses on the faculty of practical reason. While this leads him to recognize a hierarchy of humans, some having more humanity than others, it also allows him to develop the most modern understanding of social relationship available in his time. His (...)
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  17. Daisuke Araya (2008). Nishida Kitarō: Rekishi No Ronrigaku. Kōdansha.
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  18. Leonardo V. Arena (2008). Lo Spirito Del Giappone: La Filosofia Del Sol Levante Dalle Origini Ai Giorni Nostri. Bur.
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  19. Takuya Arima (2007). Kinsei Awa Kangaku Shi No Kenkyū Kogakusha Takahashi Sekisui. Chūgoku Shoten.
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  20. Yoko Arisaka, Beyond “East and West”: Nishida's Universalism and Postcolonial Critique.
    During the 1930s and 1940s, many Japanese intellectuals resisted Western cultural imperialism. This theoretical movement was unfortunately complicit with wartime nationalism. Kitaro Nishida, the founder of modern Japanese philosophy and the leading figure of the Kyoto School, has been the focus of a controversy as to whether his philosophy was inherently nationalist or not. Nishida’s defenders claim that his philosophical “universalism” was incompatible with the particularistic nationalism of Japan’s imperialist state. From the standpoint of postcolonial critique, I argue that this (...)
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  21. Yoko Arisaka (2014). Modern Japanese Philosophy: Historical Contexts and Cultural Implications. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:3-25.
    The paper provides an overview of the rise of Japanese philosophy during the period of rapid modernization in Japan after the Meiji Restoration (beginning in the 1860s). It also examines the controversy surrounding Japanese philosophy towards the end of the Pacific War (1945), and its renewal in the contemporary context. The post-Meiji thinkers engaged themselves with the questions of universality and particularity; the former represented science, medicine, technology, and philosophy (understood as ) and the latter, the Japanese non-Western tradition. Within (...)
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  22. Yoko Arisaka (1996). Space and History: Philosophy and Imperialism in Nishida and Watsuji. Dissertation, University of California, Riverside
    This dissertation analyzes the philosophical theories and politics of Kitaro Nishida , the founder of modern Japanese philosophy, and Tetsuro Watsuji , the second most famous philosopher in Japan. Both Nishida and Watsuji develop a "spatialized" conception of history to contrast with a temporal model which had the effect of situating Europe as the most advanced form of modern culture. According to their view, the representation of world history should take into account the contemporaneous developments of all cultures. ;Positioning themselves (...)
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  23. Johann P. Arnason (1987). The Modern Constellation and the Japanese Enigma PART I 1. Western Projections and Japanese Responses. Thesis Eleven 17 (1):4-39.
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  24. Tomomi Asakura (2011). On Buddhistic Ontology: A Comparative Study of Mou Zongsan and Kyoto School Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 61 (4):647-678.
    Mou Zongsan's notion of "Buddhistic ontology" is interpreted here in its fundamental difference from his own previous metaphysical scheme, in the light of the Kyoto School philosophers' similar attempts to resolve the Kantian antinomy of practical reason. This is an alternative both to the analysis provided by previous interpreters of Mou's Buddhistic philosophy, such as Hans-Rudolf Kantor and N. Serina Chan, and to the comparative studies of Mou's theories with Kyoto School philosophy by Ng Yu-kwan. Previous researchers considered Mou's Buddhist (...)
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  25. Hiroshi Asami (2009). Nishida Kitarō: Seimei to Shūkyō Ni Fukamariyuku Shisaku. Shunpūsha.
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  26. Makoto Asari (2008). Nihongo to Nihon Shisō: Motoori Norinaga, Nishida Kitarō, Mikami Akira, Karatani Kōjin. Fujiwara Shoten.
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  27. G. S. Axtell (1991). Comparative Dialectics: Nishida Kitarō's Logic of Place and Western Dialectical Thought. Philosophy East and West 41 (2):163-184.
    Philosophical anthropologist Mircea Eliade once said that "the union of opposites" is a basic category of archaic ontology and comparative world religions. In this paper I develop the theory of contrariety or opposition as a prime focus for East/West comparative philosophy. The paper considers especially Nishida Kitaro's later works and the complex phrase "zettai mujuntekijikodbitsu," variously translated by Schinzinger as "absolute contradictory self-identity," "the self-identity of absolute contradictories," or more simply as "oneness" or "unity" of opposites.
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  28. R. J. B. (1966). Shinto. Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):817-817.
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  29. Jin Baek (2008). From the "Topos of Nothingness" to the "Space of Transparency": Kitarō Nishida's Notion of Shintai and Its Influence on Art and Architecture (Part 1). Philosophy East and West 58 (1):83 - 107.
    In his philosophy of nothingness, Kitarō Nishida illuminates the matrix of transformation of the world "from the Created to the Creating" (tsukuru mono kara tsukurareta mono e) through shintai, or the body. In this matrix, shintai enters into the stage of an action-sensation continuum and emerges as the immaculate iconic tool of nothingness to create new figures as extended self. This idea of shintai has resonance with the development of postwar art in Japan. The "Space of Transparency" put forth by (...)
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  30. Jin Baek (2008). From the "Topos of Nothingness" to the "Space of Transparency": Kitarō Nishida's Notion Of. Philosophy East and West 58 (1).
    : In his philosophy of nothingness, Kitar Nishida illuminates the matrix of transformation of the world ‘‘from the Created to the Creating’’ (tsukuru mono kara tsukurareta mono e) through shintai, or the body. In this matrix, shintai enters into the stage of an action-sensation continuum and emerges as the immaculate iconic tool of nothingness to create new figures as extended self. This idea of shintai has resonance with the development of postwar art in Japan. The ‘‘Space of Transparency’’ put forth (...)
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  31. Jin Baek (2004). Empty Cross: Nothingness and the Church of Light. Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
    This dissertation contextualizes the emergence of the Church of Light by Tadao Ando within the Japanese religio-philosophical tradition of nothingness. The idea of nothingness was revived during the first half of the twentieth-century by Kitaro Nishida with two cultural ramifications in the post-war period: a series of dialogues on the points of convergence and divergence between nothingness and the God of Christianity, and an architectural art movement called Monoha, or l'Ecole de Choses. Under the concept of "structuring emptiness," Monoha attempted (...)
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  32. Louis A. Barth (1980). Japanese Phenomenology. Edited by Yoshihiro Nitta and Hirotaka Tatematsu. Modern Schoolman 57 (4):373-374.
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  33. Manu Bazzano (2006). Buddha is Dead: Nietzsche and the Dawn of European Zen. Sussex Academic Press.
    Drawing on Zen as well as on Nietzsche's thought and its ramifications in and for western culture, this book is a fervent call for a re-visioning of philosophy ...
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  34. Edward A. Beach (2008). The Postulate of Immortality in Kant: To What Extent is It Culturally Conditioned? Philosophy East and West 58 (4):pp. 492-523.
    Kant's noncognitive argument based on practical reason claims that moral considerations alone suffice to justify the idea of personal immortality as a postulate. Some recent objections are considered here that have charged him with overstepping his own distinction between phenomenon and noumenon. After examining the arguments, Kant is exonerated of having violated his own principles. More troubling, however, is the peculiarity involved in postulating an infinite progression toward a goal whose attainment, by hypothesis, would undermine the very foundations of morality (...)
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  35. Carl Becker (forthcoming). Japanese Pure Land Buddhism in Christian America. Buddhist-Christian Studies.
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  36. Carl Becker (1991). Language and Logic in Modern Japan. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (4):441-473.
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  37. Steve Bein (2008). Self Power, Other Power, and Non-Dualism in Japanese Buddhism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:7-13.
    A traditional distinction is made in scholarship on Japanese Buddhism between two means for attaining enlightenment: jiriki 自力, or "self power," and tariki 他力, or "other power." Dōgen's Sōtō Zen is the paradigmatic example of a jiriki school: according to Dōgen, one attains enlightenment through strenuous zazen and rigorous ascetic practices. Shinran's Jōdo Shin Buddhism is the paradigmatic example of a tariki school: according to Shinran, human beings are incapable of self-salvation, but by chanting the nembutsu they can invoke the (...)
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  38. Oleg Benesch (2009). Wang Yangming and Bushidō: Japanese Nativization and its Influences in Modern China. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (3):439-454.
  39. Bernard Bernier (2006). National Communion: Watsuji Tetsuro's Conception of Ethics, Power, and the Japanese Imperial State. Philosophy East and West 56 (1):84-105.
    : Watsuji Tetsurō defined ethics as being generated by a double negation: the individual's negation of the community and the self-negation of the individual who returns to the community. Thus, ethics for him is based on the individual's sacrifice for the collectivity. This position results in the conception of the community as an absolute. I contend that there is a congruence between Watsuji's conception of ethics as self-sacrifice and the way he perceived the Japanese political system. To him, the imperial (...)
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  40. M. L. S. Bette Anton, DeWitt C. Baldwin Jr, Catherine Belling, Patricia Benner, Alister Browne, Devra S. Cohen & Jack Coulehan (2003). David M. Adams, Ph. D., is Professor of Philosophy at California State Poly-Technic University, Pomona. Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the School of Public Health at Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12:1-3.
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  41. Chongdao Bian (2008). Rong He Yu Gong Sheng: Dong Ya Shi Yu Zhong de Riben Zhe Xue. Ren Min Chu Ban She.
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  42. H. Gene Blocker & Christopher L. Starling (2001). Japanese Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    An overview of Japanese philosophy from the seventh century to the present.
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  43. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2007). From Community to Time-Space Development: Comparing N. S. Trubetzkoy, Nishida Kitar, and Watsuji Tetsur. Asian Philosophy 17 (3):263 – 282.
    I introduce and compare Russian and Japanese notions of community and space. Some characteristic strains of thought that exist in both countries had similar points of departure, overcame similar problems and arrived at similar results. In general, in Japan and Russia, the nostalgia for the community has been strong because one felt that in society through modernization something of the particularity of one's culture had been lost. As a consequence, both in Japan and in Russia allusions to the German sociologist (...)
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  44. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (ed.) (2004). Place and Dream: Japan and the Virtual. Rodopi.
    This is a book about space. On a first level, it reflects traditional Japanese ideas of space against various “items” of Western culture. Among these items are Bakhtin's “dialogicity”, Wittgenstein’s Lebensform, and “virtual space” or “globalized” space as representatives of the latest development of an “alienated”, modern spatial experience. Some of the Western concepts of space appear as negative counter examples to“basho-like”, Japanese places; others turn out to be compatible with the Japanese idea of space.On a second level, the book (...)
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  45. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2003). Nishida and Wittgenstein: From 'Pure Experience' to Lebensform or New Perspectives for a Philosophy of Intercultural Communication. Asian Philosophy 13 (1):53 – 70.
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  46. James W. Boyd & Ron G. Williams (2005). Japanese Shinto: An Interpretation of a Priestly Perspective. Philosophy East and West 55 (1):33-63.
    : This is an interpretation of the experiential/religious meaning of Japanese Shrine Shintō as taught us primarily by the priests at Tsubaki Grand Shrine, Suzuka, Mie Prefecture. As a heuristic device, we suggest lines of comparison between the thought and practice of the Tsubaki priests and two Western thinkers: the Jewish philosopher Martin Buber and the French philosopher Georges Bataille. This in turn allows the construction of three interpretive categories that we believe illuminate both the Shintō worldview and Shintō ritual (...)
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  47. Jan Van Bragt (1995). Kyoto Philosophy—Intrinsically Nationalistic? In James W. Heisig & John C. Maraldo (eds.), Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, & the Question of Nationalism. University of Hawai'i Press.
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  48. Garrett Zantow Bredeson (2008). On Dōgen and Derrida. Philosophy East and West 58 (1):60-82.
    : Are Derrida’s critique of presence and Dōgen’s emphasis on presence incompatible? I argue that they are not—and, in fact, that there is a deep connection between the projects of the two thinkers. In showing this I hope to combat some serious misconceptions about essential aspects of both Zen Buddhism and deconstruction.
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  49. Anne Page Brooks (1981). Review of Mizukokuyo and Japanese Buddhism. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 8:119-147.
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  50. Lydia Brüll (1988). Kitaro Nishida Bibliography. International Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):373-381.
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