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  1. Reiji Andō (2010). Basho to Musubi: Kindai Nihon Shisōshi. Kōdansha.
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  2. Shōeki Andō (1992). The Animal Court: A Political Fable From Old Japan. Weatherhill.
  3. Olivier Ansart (2012). The Happiness of the Wicked: How Tokugawa Thinkers Dealt with the Problem. Asian Philosophy 22 (2):161-175.
    Phenomena like the happiness of the wicked or the misfortune of the worthies were for Confucian thinkers, just as for Christian theologians, puzzles that their ?theories on fortune and misfortune?, just like Theodicies in the West, were trying, with some difficulty, to explain or rationalize. This article first surveys some standard explanations of the phenomena given by scholars of eighteenth-century Japan within the framework of the available monist, rationalist paradigms. Afterward, it turns to another type of representation of the world (...)
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  4. Olivier Ansart (2009). Making Sense of Sorai: How to Deal with the Contradictions in Ogy Sorai's Political Theory. Asian Philosophy 19 (1):11 – 30.
    To understand the political theory—and especially its alleged modernity—of Ogyumacr Sorai, one of the most important philosophers of Tokugawa Japan, we need to understand the pivotal role that heaven, gods and spirits play in this theory. This is no easy task. This article will start with an analysis of the reasons of this difficulty: the numerous tensions and contradictions found in Sorai's remarks on the subject. Refusing to ignore one side of the story, refusing (...)
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  5. Olivier Ansart (2006). Kaiho Seiry on 'What It is to Be a Human Being'. Asian Philosophy 16 (1):65 – 86.
    Kaiho Seiry (1755-1817) is probably the first Japanese thinker to proclaim the contractual nature of human relationships. I examine in this paper the view of human beings that led him to this conclusion. Giving up previous definitions of humans, Seiry focuses on the faculty of practical reason. While this leads him to recognize a hierarchy of humans, some having more humanity than others, it also allows him to develop the most modern understanding of social relationship available in his time. His (...)
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  6. Daisuke Araya (2008). Nishida Kitarō: Rekishi No Ronrigaku. Kōdansha.
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  7. Leonardo V. Arena (2008). Lo Spirito Del Giappone: La Filosofia Del Sol Levante Dalle Origini Ai Giorni Nostri. Bur.
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  8. Takuya Arima (2007). Kinsei Awa Kangaku Shi No Kenkyū Kogakusha Takahashi Sekisui. Chūgoku Shoten.
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  9. Yoko Arisaka, Beyond “East and West”: Nishida's Universalism and Postcolonial Critique.
    During the 1930s and 1940s, many Japanese intellectuals resisted Western cultural imperialism. This theoretical movement was unfortunately complicit with wartime nationalism. Kitaro Nishida, the founder of modern Japanese philosophy and the leading figure of the Kyoto School, has been the focus of a controversy as to whether his philosophy was inherently nationalist or not. Nishida’s defenders claim that his philosophical “universalism” was incompatible with the particularistic nationalism of Japan’s imperialist state. From the standpoint of postcolonial critique, I argue that this (...)
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  10. Tomomi Asakura (2011). On Buddhistic Ontology: A Comparative Study of Mou Zongsan and Kyoto School Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 61 (4):647-678.
    Mou Zongsan's notion of "Buddhistic ontology" is interpreted here in its fundamental difference from his own previous metaphysical scheme, in the light of the Kyoto School philosophers' similar attempts to resolve the Kantian antinomy of practical reason. This is an alternative both to the analysis provided by previous interpreters of Mou's Buddhistic philosophy, such as Hans-Rudolf Kantor and N. Serina Chan, and to the comparative studies of Mou's theories with Kyoto School philosophy by Ng Yu-kwan. Previous researchers considered Mou's Buddhist (...)
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  11. Hiroshi Asami (2009). Nishida Kitarō: Seimei to Shūkyō Ni Fukamariyuku Shisaku. Shunpūsha.
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  12. Makoto Asari (2008). Nihongo to Nihon Shisō: Motoori Norinaga, Nishida Kitarō, Mikami Akira, Karatani Kōjin. Fujiwara Shoten.
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  13. G. S. Axtell (1991). Comparative Dialectics: Nishida Kitarō's Logic of Place and Western Dialectical Thought. Philosophy East and West 41 (2):163-184.
    Philosophical anthropologist Mircea Eliade once said that "the union of opposites" is a basic category of archaic ontology and comparative world religions. In this paper I develop the theory of contrariety or opposition as a prime focus for East/West comparative philosophy. The paper considers especially Nishida Kitaro's later works and the complex phrase "zettai mujuntekijikodbitsu," variously translated by Schinzinger as "absolute contradictory self-identity," "the self-identity of absolute contradictories," or more simply as "oneness" or "unity" of opposites.
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  14. Jin Baek (2008). From the "Topos of Nothingness" to the "Space of Transparency": Kitarō Nishida's Notion of Shintai and Its Influence on Art and Architecture (Part 1). Philosophy East and West 58 (1):83 - 107.
    In his philosophy of nothingness, Kitarō Nishida illuminates the matrix of transformation of the world "from the Created to the Creating" (tsukuru mono kara tsukurareta mono e) through shintai, or the body. In this matrix, shintai enters into the stage of an action-sensation continuum and emerges as the immaculate iconic tool of nothingness to create new figures as extended self. This idea of shintai has resonance with the development of postwar art in Japan. The "Space of Transparency" put forth by (...)
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  15. Jin Baek (2008). From the "Topos of Nothingness" to the "Space of Transparency": Kitarō Nishida's Notion Of. Philosophy East and West 58 (1).
    : In his philosophy of nothingness, Kitar Nishida illuminates the matrix of transformation of the world ‘‘from the Created to the Creating’’ (tsukuru mono kara tsukurareta mono e) through shintai, or the body. In this matrix, shintai enters into the stage of an action-sensation continuum and emerges as the immaculate iconic tool of nothingness to create new figures as extended self. This idea of shintai has resonance with the development of postwar art in Japan. The ‘‘Space of Transparency’’ put forth (...)
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  16. Louis A. Barth (1980). Japanese Phenomenology. Edited by Yoshihiro Nitta and Hirotaka Tatematsu. The Modern Schoolman 57 (4):373-374.
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  17. Manu Bazzano (2006). Buddha is Dead: Nietzsche and the Dawn of European Zen. Sussex Academic Press.
    Drawing on Zen as well as on Nietzsche's thought and its ramifications in and for western culture, this book is a fervent call for a re-visioning of philosophy ...
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  18. Edward A. Beach (2008). The Postulate of Immortality in Kant: To What Extent is It Culturally Conditioned? Philosophy East and West 58 (4):pp. 492-523.
    Kant's noncognitive argument based on practical reason claims that moral considerations alone suffice to justify the idea of personal immortality as a postulate. Some recent objections are considered here that have charged him with overstepping his own distinction between phenomenon and noumenon. After examining the arguments, Kant is exonerated of having violated his own principles. More troubling, however, is the peculiarity involved in postulating an infinite progression toward a goal whose attainment, by hypothesis, would undermine the very foundations of morality (...)
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  19. Carl Becker (1991). Language and Logic in Modern Japan. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (4):441-473.
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  20. Steve Bein (2008). Self Power, Other Power, and Non-Dualism in Japanese Buddhism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:7-13.
    A traditional distinction is made in scholarship on Japanese Buddhism between two means for attaining enlightenment: jiriki 自力, or "self power," and tariki 他力, or "other power." Dōgen's Sōtō Zen is the paradigmatic example of a jiriki school: according to Dōgen, one attains enlightenment through strenuous zazen and rigorous ascetic practices. Shinran's Jōdo Shin Buddhism is the paradigmatic example of a tariki school: according to Shinran, human beings are incapable of self-salvation, but by chanting the nembutsu they can invoke the (...)
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  21. Oleg Benesch (2009). Wang Yangming and Bushidō: Japanese Nativization and its Influences in Modern China. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (3):439-454.
  22. Chongdao Bian (2008). Rong He Yu Gong Sheng: Dong Ya Shi Yu Zhong de Riben Zhe Xue. Ren Min Chu Ban She.
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  23. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2007). From Community to Time-Space Development: Comparing N. S. Trubetzkoy, Nishida Kitar, and Watsuji Tetsur. Asian Philosophy 17 (3):263 – 282.
    I introduce and compare Russian and Japanese notions of community and space. Some characteristic strains of thought that exist in both countries had similar points of departure, overcame similar problems and arrived at similar results. In general, in Japan and Russia, the nostalgia for the community has been strong because one felt that in society through modernization something of the particularity of one's culture had been lost. As a consequence, both in Japan and in Russia allusions to the German sociologist (...)
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  24. Garrett Zantow Bredeson (2008). On Dōgen and Derrida. Philosophy East and West 58 (1):60-82.
    : Are Derrida’s critique of presence and Dōgen’s emphasis on presence incompatible? I argue that they are not—and, in fact, that there is a deep connection between the projects of the two thinkers. In showing this I hope to combat some serious misconceptions about essential aspects of both Zen Buddhism and deconstruction.
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  25. Kevin Burns (2006). Eastern Philosophy: The Greatest Thinkers and Sages From Ancient to Modern Times. Enchanted Lion Books.
    A clear and engaging presentation of history's most influential Eastern thinkers Eastern Philosophy provides a detailed but accessible analysis of the work of nearly sixty thinkers from all of the major Eastern philosophical traditions, from the earliest times to the present day. Covering systems, schools, and individuals, Eastern Philosophy presents founder figures such as Zoroaster and Mohammed as well as modern thinkers such as Nishida Kitaro, perhaps the preeminent figure within modern Japanese philosophy. From Buddhism to Islam, Confucius to Gandhi, (...)
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  26. Susan L. Burns (2003). Before the Nation: Kokugaku and the Imagining of Community in Early Modern Japan. Duke University Press.
    Late Tokugawa society and the crisis of community -- Before the Kojikiden : the divine age narrative in Tokugawa Japan -- Motoori Norinaga : discovering Japan -- Ueda Akinari : history and community -- Fujitani Mitsue : the poetics off community -- Tachibana Moribe : cosmology and community -- National literature, intellectual history, and the new Kokugaku -- Conclusion : imagined Japan(s).
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  27. Richard Capobianco (2008). Martin Heidegger's Thinking and Japanese Philosophy and From Martin Heidegger's Reply in Appreciation. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):349-357.
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  28. Robert E. Carter (2012). More Essays on Japanese Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 62 (3):403-407.
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  29. Robert E. Carter (2012). Nishida Kitarō: Place and Dialectic: Two Essays by Nishida Kitarō Trans. By John W. M. Krummel and Shigenori Nagatomo. Introduction by John W. M. Krummel. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (1):67-70.
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  30. Robert E. Carter (2011). Essays on Japanese Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 61 (1):216-220.
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  31. Robert E. Carter (2009). God and Nothingness. Philosophy East and West 59 (1):pp. 1-21.
    The idea of nothingness has been viewed as neither a vital nor a positive element in Western philosophy or theology. With the exception of a handful of mystics, nothingness has been taken to refer to the negation of being, or to some theoretical void. By contrast, the Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitarō gave nothingness a central role in philosophy. The strategy of this essay is to use the German mystic Meister Eckhart as a more familiar thinker who did take nothingness seriously, (...)
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  32. Robert Edgar Carter (2013). The Kyoto School: An Introduction. State University of New York Press.
    This volume provides an introduction to the Kyoto School of Japanese philosophy.
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  33. Robert Edgar Carter (2004). Philosophers of Nothingness: An Essay on the Kyoto School (Review). Philosophy East and West 54 (2):273-276.
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  34. Robert Edgar Carter (1989). The Nothingness Beyond God: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Nishida Kitaro. Paragon House.
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  35. Diané Collinson, Dr Robert Wilkinson & Robert Wilkinson (1994). Thirty-Five Oriental Philosophers. Routledge.
    These are questions to which oriental thinkers have given a wide range of philosophical answers that are intellectually and imaginatively stimulating. Thirty-Five Oriental Philosophers is a succinctly informative introduction to the thought of thirty-five important figures in the Chinese, Indian, Arab, Japanese and Tibetan philosophical traditions. Thinkers covered include founders such as Zoroaster, Confucius, Buddha and Muhammed, as well as influential modern figures such as Gandhi, Mao Tse-Tung, Suzuki and Nishida. The book is divided into sections, in which an introduction (...)
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  36. Eric Cunningham (2007). Hallucinating the End of History: Nishida, Zen, and the Psychedelic Eschaton. Academica Press.
    The problem of Nishida Kitaro's historical philosophy and an introduction to the psychedelic paradigm -- The Zen nexus between Nishida Kitaro and modern psychedelic experience -- Experience and the self: the early phase of Nishida's thought (1911-1931) -- Nishida Kitaro's historical world (1931-1945) -- A psychedelic paradigm of history -- Hallucinating the end of history: reflections on myth, the eschaton and the problem of overcoming modernity.
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  37. Deane Curtin (1994). Dōgen, Deep Ecology, and the Ecological Self. Environmental Ethics 16 (2):195-213.
    A core project for deep ecologists is the reformulation of the concept of self. In searching for a more inclusive understanding of self, deep ecologists often look to Buddhist philosophy, and to the Japanese Buddhist philosopher Dōgen in particular, for inspiration. I argue that, while Dōgen does share a nondualist, nonanthropocentric framework with deep ecology, his phenomenology of the self is fundamentally at odds with the expanded Self found in the deep ecology literature. I suggest, though I do not fully (...)
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  38. Fred Dallmayr (1992). Nothingness and Śūnyatā: A Comparison of Heidegger and Nishitani. Philosophy East and West 42 (1):37-48.
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  39. Bret W. Davis, The Kyoto School. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  40. Bret W. Davis (2004). Zen After Zarathustra: The Problem of the Will in the Confrontation Between Nietzsche and Buddhism. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 28 (1):89-138.
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  41. Liu Diao (2008). Sanmuqing de Zhe Xue Yan Jiu =. She Hui Ke Xue Wen Xian Chu Ban She.
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  42. David Dilworth (1970). Nishida's Early Pantheistic Voluntarism. Philosophy East and West 20 (1):35-49.
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  43. David A. Dilworth, V. H. Viglielmo & Agustín Jacinto Zavala (eds.) (1998). Sourcebook for Modern Japanese Philosophy: Selected Documents. Greenwood Press.
    Nishida Kitarô -- Tanabe Hajime -- Kuki Shûzô -- Watsuji Tetsurô -- Miki Kiyoshi -- Tosaka Jun -- Nishitani Keiji.
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  44. Jun Endō (2008). Hirata Kokugaku to Kinsei Shakai. Perikansha.
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  45. Jacques Fason (2004). Zen Apologetics: Reflections on Wright'sPhilosophical Meditations on Zen Buddhism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):77-85.
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  46. Andrew Feenberg (1999). Experience and Culture: Nishida's Path "to the Things Themselves". Philosophy East and West 49 (1):28-44.
    The word "experience" refers to at least four different concepts: empirical experience, lived experience, experience as Bildung, and the domain of pure consciousness prior to the division of subject and object. All these concepts of experience are at work in the thought of Nishida Kitarō, where they take on a specific historical and political character in response to the situation of Japan in the world system.
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  47. Bronwyn Finnigan & Koji Tanaka (2010). Don't Think! Just Act! In Graham Priest & Damon Young (eds.), Philosophy and the Martial Arts. Open Court.
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  48. Victor Forte (2007). Did Dōgen Go to China? What He Wrote and When He Wrote It – by Steven Heine. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (4):637–640.
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  49. Jisō Forzani (2006). I Fiori Del Vuoto: Introduzione Alla Filosofia Giapponese. Bollati Boringhieri.
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  50. Toby Avard Foshay (1994). Denegation, Nonduality, and Language in Derrida and Dōgen. Philosophy East and West 44 (3):543-558.
1 — 50 / 373