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  1. Philip Alperson (1984). On Musical Improvisation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (1):17-29.
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  2. Bruce Ellis Benson (2008). Stealing Licks : Recording and Identity in Jazz. In Mine Doğantan (ed.), Recorded Music: Philosophical and Critical Reflections. Middlesex University Press.
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  3. Bruce Ellis Benson (2003). The Improvisation of Musical Dialogue: A Phenomenology of Music. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is an important contribution to the philosophy of music. Whereas most books in this field focus on the creation and reproduction of music, Bruce Benson's concern is the phenomenology of music making as an activity. He offers the radical thesis that it is improvisation that is primary in the moment of music making. Succinct and lucid, the book brings together a wide range of musical examples from classical music, jazz, early music and other genres. It offers a rich (...)
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  4. Lee B. Brown (2008). Art From Start to Finish: Jazz, Painting, Writing, and Other Improvisations Edited by Becker, Howard S., Robert R. Faulkner, and Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (2):205–208.
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  5. Lee B. Brown (2002). Jazz: America's Classical Music? Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):157-172.
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  6. Lee B. Brown (2000). "Feeling My Way": Jazz Improvisation and its Vicissitudes-a Plea for Imperfection. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):113-123.
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  7. Lee B. Brown (1999). Postmodernist Jazz Theory: Afrocentrism, Old and New. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):235-246.
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  8. Lee B. Brown (1991). The Theory of Jazz Music "It Don't Mean a Thing...". Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (2):115-127.
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  9. James Buhler (2006). Frankfurt School Blues : Rethinking Adorno's Critique of Jazz. In Berthold Hoeckner (ed.), Apparitions: New Perspectives on Adorno and Twentieth Century Music. Routledge.
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  10. John M. Carvalho (2010). Repetition and Self-Realization in Jazz Improvisation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):285-290.
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  11. Ann Chinnery (2003). Aesthetics of Surrender: Levinas and the Disruption of Agency in Moral Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (1):5-17.
    Education has long been charged with the taskof forming and shaping subjectivity andidentity. However, the prevailing view ofeducation as a project of producing rationalautonomous subjects has been challenged bypostmodern and poststructuralist critiques ofsubstantial subjectivity. In a similar vein,Emmanuel Levinas inverts the traditionalconception of subjectivity, claiming that weare constituted as subjects only in respondingto the other. In other words, subjectivity isderivative of an existentially priorresponsibility to and for the other. Hisconception of ethical responsibility is thusalso a radical departure from the prevailingview (...)
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  12. Gregory Clark (2010). Rhetorical Experience and the National Jazz Museum in Harlem. In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press.
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  13. Tom Cochrane (2008). Expression and Extended Cognition. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):59-73.
    I argue for the possibility of an extremely intimate connection between the emotional content of the music and the emotional state of the person who produces that music. Under certain specified conditions, the music may not just influence, but also partially constitute the musician’s emotional state.
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  14. William Day (2000). Knowing as Instancing: Jazz Improvisation and Moral Perfectionism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):99-111.
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  15. Gerard Delanty (ed.) (2004). Theodor W. Adorno. Sage.
    Theodor W.Adorno was one of the towering intellectuals of the twentieth century. His contributions cover such a myriad of fields, including the sociology of culture, social theory, the philosophy of music, ethics, art and aesthetics, film, ideology, the critique of modernity and musical composition, that it is difficult to assimilate the sheer range and profundity of his achievement. His celebrated friendship with Walter Benjamin has produced some of the most moving and insightful correspondence on the origins and objects of the (...)
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  16. Theodore Gracyk (2002). Jazz After Jazz : Ken Burns and the Construction of Jazz History. Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):173-187.
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  17. Garry Hagberg (2002). On Representing Jazz: An Art Form in Need of Understanding. Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):188-198.
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  18. Garry L. Hagberg (2008). Jazz Improvisation and Ethical Interaction : A Sketch of the Connections. In Garry Hagberg (ed.), Art and Ethical Criticism. Blackwell Pub..
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  19. Berthold Hoeckner (ed.) (2006). Apparitions: New Perspectives on Adorno and Twentieth Century Music. Routledge.
    Apparitions takes a new look at the critical legacy of one of the 20th century's most important and influential thinkers about music, Theodor W. Adorno. Bringing together an international group of scholars, the book offers new historical and critical insights into Adorno's theories of music and how these theories, in turn, have affected the study of contemporary art music, popular music, and jazz. The essays review the impact of Philosophy of New Music a fter World War II, examine Adorno's struggle (...)
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  20. Neil P. Hurley (1969). Toward a Sociology of Jazz. Thought 44 (2):219-246.
    A lively and scholarly analysis of the history of jazz in its long voyage from a New Orleans barrel-house type of enterprise to global acceptance.
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  21. Gary Iseminger (2010). Sonicism and Jazz Improvisation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (3):297-299.
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  22. Andrew Kania (2011). All Play and No Work: An Ontology of Jazz. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):391-403.
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  23. Andrew Kania (2008). Works, Recordings, Performances : Classical, Rock, Jazz. In Mine Doğantan (ed.), Recorded Music: Philosophical and Critical Reflections. Middlesex University Press.
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  24. Robert Kraut (2007/2010). Artworld Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.
    Artworld Metaphysics turns a critical eye upon aspects of the artworld, and articulates some of the problems, principles, and norms implicit in the actual practices of artistic creation, interpretation, evaluation, and commodification. Aesthetic theory is treated as descriptive and explanatory, rather than normative: a theory that relates to artworld realities as a semantic theory relates to the fragments of natural language it seeks to describe. Robert Kraut examines emotional expression, correct interpretation and objectivity in the context of artworld practice, the (...)
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  25. Robert Kraut (2005). Why Does Jazz Matter to Aesthetic Theory? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):3–15.
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  26. Joseph D. Lewandowski (1996). Adorno on Jazz and Society. Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (5):103-121.
    In this essay I offer a philosophical-political reconstruction of Theodor Adorno's engagements with jazz. Rather than consider whether or not Adorno got jazz 'right', I give an account of how and why Adorno develops the criticisms that he does. I argue that in Adorno's analysis of jazz three interpenetrating claims emerge: (1) a rejection of jazz's sense of improvisation and spontaneity; (2) a demonstration of jazz's entwinement with the modern technologiza tion of everyday life; and (3) a critique of jazz's (...)
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  27. Judith Irene Lochhead & Joseph Henry Auner (eds.) (2002). Postmodern Music/Postmodern Thought. Routledge.
    What is postmodern music and how does it differ from earlier styles, including modernist music? What roles have electronic technologies and sound production played in defining postmodern music? Has postmodern music blurred the lines between high and popular music? Addressing these and other questions, this ground-breaking collection gathers together for the first time essays on postmodernism and music written primarily by musicologists, covering a wide range of musical styles including concert music, jazz, film music, and popular music. Topics include: the (...)
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  28. Michael Magee (2003). Ralph Ellison: Pragmatism, Jazz and the American Vernacular. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 39 (2):227 - 258.
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  29. Jody Patterson (2011). Jazz, Modernism, and Murals in New Deal New York. In Charlotte De Mille (ed.), Music and Modernism, C. 1849-1950. Cambridge Scholars Pub..
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  30. Paul E. Rinzler (2008). The Contradictions of Jazz. Scarecrow Press.
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  31. Clifton Sanders (2009). Democracy as Music, Music as Democracy. Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1/2):219-239.
    In this paper we argue that there are valuable consonances between democratic theory and music theory, and between democratization and musical performance and enjoyment. We suggest that this connection is not as trite as it may first appear, but that, since democracy is learned and practiced in a myriad ofways, music is one such place to learn democratic citizenship. The paper begins with a normative account of democratic theory that is present in two movements. The first, “foundations,” explicates the essential (...)
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  32. Stephen Frederick Schneck (1989). Habits of the Head: Tocqueville's America and Jazz. Political Theory 17 (4):638-662.
    Nothing conceivable is so petty, so insipid, so crowded with paltry interestsin one word, so anti-poeticas the life of a man in the United States. [Tocqueville];1Anyone who allows the growing respectability of mass culture to seduce him into equating a popular song with modem art because of a few false notes squeaked by a clarinet; anyone who mistakes a triad studded with "dirty notes" for atonality, has already capitulated to barbarism. Art which has degenerated to culture pays the price of (...)
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  33. Christopher Washburne (2004). Does Kenny G Play Bad Jazz? : A Case Study. In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge. 123.
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  34. Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.) (2004). Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge.
    Why are some popular musical forms and performers universally reviled by critics and ignored by scholars-despite enjoying large-scale popularity? How has the notion of what makes "good" or "bad" music changed over the years-and what does this tell us about the writers who have assigned these tags to different musical genres? Many composers that are today part of the classical "canon" were greeted initially by bad reviews. Similarly, jazz, country, and pop musics were all once rejected as "bad" by the (...)
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  35. Tony Whyton (2008). Acting on Impulse! : Recordings and the Reification of Jazz. In Mine Doğantan (ed.), Recorded Music: Philosophical and Critical Reflections. Middlesex University Press.
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  36. Robert W. Witkin (2000). Why Did Adorno "Hate" Jazz? Sociological Theory 18 (1):145-170.
    Adrono's jazz essays have attracted considerable notoriety not only for their negative and dismissive evaluation of jazz as music but for their outright dismissal of all the claims made on behalf of jazz by its exponents and admirers, even of claims concerning the black origins of jazz music. This paper offers a critical exposition of Adorno's views on jazz and outlines an alternative theory of the culture industry as the basis of a critique of Adorno's critical theory. Adorno's arguments are (...)
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  37. James O. Young & Carl Matheson (2000). The Metaphysics of Jazz. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):125-133.
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