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  1. Felix K. Ameka (2002). Cultural Scripting of Body Parts for Emotions: On "Jealousy" and Related Emotions in Ewe. Pragmatics and Cognition 10 (1):27-56.
    Different languages present a variety of ways of talking about emotional experience. Very commonly, feelings are described through the use of ¿body image constructions¿ in which they are associated with processes in, or states of, specific body parts. The emotions and the body parts that are thought to be their locus and the kind of activity associated with these body parts vary cross-culturally. This study focuses on the meaning of three ¿body image constructions¿ used to describe feelings similar to, but (...)
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  2. Nirit Bauminger, Liza Chomsky-Smolkin, Efrat Orbach-Caspi, Ditza Zachor & Rachel Levy-Shiff (2008). Jealousy and Emotional Responsiveness in Young Children with ASD. Cognition and Emotion 22 (4):595-619.
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  3. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev (1990). Envy and Jealousy. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):487 - 516.
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  4. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev & Ruhama Goussinsky (2008). In The Name of Love: Romantic Ideology and its Victims. OUP Oxford.
    We yearn to experience the idealized love depicted in so many novels, movies, poems, and popular songs. Ironically, it is the idealization of love that arms it with its destructive power. Popular media consistently remind us that love is all we need, but statistics concerning the rate of depression and suicides after divorce or romantic break up remind us what might happened if "all that we need" is taken away. This book is about our ideals of love, our experiences, of (...)
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  5. Aaron Ben-Ze’Ev (1990). Envy and Jealousy. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):487-516.
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  6. Mark Breitenberg (forthcoming). Anxious Masculinity: Sexual Jealousy in Early Modern England. Feminist Studies.
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  7. Robert P. Brenner (forthcoming). Love and Entitlement: Sartre and Beauvoir on the Nature of Jealousy. Hypatia.
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  8. David M. Buss & Martie Haselton (2005). The Evolution of Jealousy. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (11):506-507.
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  9. Yen-Hsin Chen & Kristján Kristjánsson (2011). Private Feelings, Public Expressions: Professional Jealousy and the Moral Practice of Teaching. Journal of Moral Education 40 (3):349-358.
    This paper explores the issue of personal factors that impinge upon education. More specifically, it addresses professional jealousy among teachers and how it affects the moral practice of teaching. Our focus is teachers? emotions in general and teachers? jealousies in particular, in the context of the ideal of the moral teacher. We identify and criticise three common dichotomies that tend to mar explorations of teachers? emotions. We illustrate issues of professional jealousy as revealed in an interview with a headteacher in (...)
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  10. Martin P. East & Fraser N. Watts (1999). Jealousy and Envy. In Tim Dalgleish & M. J. Powers (eds.), Handbook of Cognition and Emotion. Wiley. 569--588.
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  11. Judith A. Easton, Lucas D. Schipper & Todd K. Shackelford (2006). Why the Adaptationist Perspective Must Be Considered: The Example of Morbid Jealousy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):411-412.
    We describe delusional disorder–jealous type (“morbid jealousy”) with the adaptationist perspective used by Darwinian psychiatrists and evolutionary psychologists to explain the relatively common existence and continued prevalence of mental disorders. We then apply the “harmful dysfunction” analysis to morbid jealousy, including a discussion of this disorder as (1) an end on a continuum of normal jealousy or (2) a discrete entity. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  12. Judith A. Easton & Todd K. Shackelford (2009). Morbid Jealousy and Sex Differences in Partner-Directed Violence. Human Nature 20 (3):342-350.
    Previous research suggests that individuals diagnosed with morbid jealousy have jealousy mechanisms that are activated at lower thresholds than individuals with normal jealousy, but that these mechanisms produce behavior that is similar to individuals with normal jealousy. We extended previous research documenting these similarities by investigating sex differences in partner-directed violence committed by individuals diagnosed with morbid jealousy. The results support some of our predictions. For example, a greater percentage of men than women diagnosed with morbid jealousy used physical violence, (...)
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  13. Alicia M. Evans, Michael Traynor & Nel Glass (2014). An Exploration of Jealousy in Nursing: A Kleinian Analysis. Nursing Inquiry 21 (2):171-178.
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  14. Elaine Fantham (2005). Phthonos D. Konstan, N. K. Rutter (Edd.): Envy, Spite and Jealousy. The Rivalrous Emotions in Ancient Greece . (Edinburgh Leventis Studies 2.) Pp. Xiv + 305. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2003. Cased, £45. ISBN: 0-7846-1603-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):180-.
  15. Daniel M. Farrell (1980). Jealousy. Philosophical Review 89 (4):527-559.
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  16. Rachel Fredericks (2012). Troubling Others and Tormenting Ourselves: The Nature and Moral Significance of Jealousy. Dissertation, University of Washington
    Jealousy is an emotion that arises in diverse circumstances and is experienced in phenomenologically diverse ways. In part because of this diversity, evaluations of jealous subjects tend to be conflicting and ambiguous. Thus philosophers who are interested in the moral status of jealousy face a challenge: to explain how, despite the diversity of jealous subjects and experiences of jealousy, our moral evaluations of those subjects in light of those experiences might be unified. In this project, I confront and respond to (...)
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  17. David C. Geary, M. Catherine DeSoto, Mary K. Hoard, Melanie Skaggs Sheldon & M. Lynne Cooper (2001). Estrogens and Relationship Jealousy. Human Nature 12 (4):299-320.
    The relation between sex hormones and responses to partner infidelity was explored in two studies reported here. The first confirmed the standard sex difference in relationship jealousy, that males (n=133) are relatively more distressed by a partner’s sexual infidelity and females (n=159) by a partner’s emotional infidelity. The study also revealed that females using hormone-based birth control (n=61) tended more toward sexual jealousy than did other females, and reported more intense affective responses to partner infidelity (n=77). In study two, 47 (...)
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  18. Peter Goldie (2003). Review: Justifying Emotions: Pride and Jealousy. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (447):551-555.
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  19. David Hume, Of the Jealousy of Trade.
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  20. Kristjan Kristjansson (2001). Justifying Emotions: Pride and Jealousy. Routledge.
    Kristjan Kristjansson challenges this common view and argues that emotions are central to moral excellence and that both pride and jealousy are indeed ingredients of a well-rounded virtuous life.
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  21. Kristján Kristjánsson (1996). Why Persons Need Jealousy. The Personalist Forum 12 (2):163-181.
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  22. Hugh LaFollette, "Sex and Jealousy" By.
    Whenever two people have a close relationship, one or both of them may occasionally become jealous. Jealousy can occur in any type of relationship, although it is more frequent and typically more potent between lovers. Hence, I shall begin by discussing jealousy among lovers. Later I will show how that account is also applicable to other close personal relationships.
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  23. Roger E. Lamb (ed.) (1997). Love Analyzed. Westview Press.
    Philosophers have turned their attention in recent years to many previously unmined topics, among them love and friendship. In this collection of new essays in philosophical and moral psychology, philosophers turn their analytic tools to a topic perhaps most resistant to reasoned analysis: erotic love. Also included is one previously published paper by Martha Nussbaum.Among the problems discussed are the role that qualities of the beloved play in love, the so-called union theory of love, intentionality and autonomy in love, and (...)
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  24. Irene Mcmullin (2011). Love and Entitlement: Sartre and Beauvoir on the Nature of Jealousy. Hypatia 26 (1):102-122.
    This paper argues that an essential and often overlooked feature of jealousy is the sense that one is entitled to the affirmation provided by the love relationship. By turning to Sartre's and Beauvoir's analyses of love and its distortions, I will show how the public nature of identity can inhibit the possibility of genuine love. Since we must depend on the freedom of others to show us who we are, the uncertainty this introduces into one's sense of self can trigger (...)
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  25. Jennifer McWeeny (2012). The Feminist Phenomenology of Excess: Ontological Multiplicity, Auto-Jealousy, and Suicide in Beauvoir's L'Invitée. Continental Philosophy Review 45 (1):41-75.
    In this paper, I present a new reading of Simone de Beauvoir’s first major work, L’Invitée ( She Came to Stay ), in order to reveal the text as a vital place of origin for feminist phenomenological philosophy. My reading of L’Invitée departs from most scholarly interpretations of the text in three notable respects: (1) it is inclusive of the “two unpublished chapters” that were excised from the original manuscript at the publisher’s request, (2) it takes seriously Beauvoir’s claim that (...)
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  26. Alfred R. Mele (2006). Self-Deception and Delusions. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 2 (1):109-124.
    My central question in this paper is how delusional beliefs are related to self-deception. In section 1, I summarize my position on what self-deception is and how representative instances of it are to be explained. I turn to delusions in section 2, where I focus on the Capgras delusion, delusional jealousy (or the Othello syndrome), and the reverse Othello syndrome.
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  27. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2002). Jealousy, Shame, and the Rival. Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):143 - 150.
    This essay is a critique of the two chapters on jealousy in Jerome Neu's book A Tear is an Intellectual Thing. The rival — as anobject of both fear and hatred — is of central importance in romantic jealousy, but it is here argued that the role of the rival cannot be fully understood in Neu's account of jealousy and that shame (not noted by Neu) must be seen as central to the concept of jealousy if the role of the (...)
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  28. Jerome Neu (2002). Reply to My Critics. Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):159 - 171.
    In response to critical discussion of my book, A Tear Is an Intellectual Thing: The Meanings of Emotion, I clarify and develop various aspects of my analysis of jealousy in particular and affectivity in general. In relation to jealousy, I explore the nature of pathology, the role of fantasy and of the rival, and the place of examples and of evolutionary theory. In relation to affectivity, I emphasize the difference between distinguishing emotions from other psychological states and distinguishing among, within (...)
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  29. Jerome Neu (2000). A Tear is an Intellectual Thing: The Meanings of Emotion. Oxford University Press.
    Is jealousy eliminable? If so, at what cost? What are the connections between pride the sin and the pride insisted on by identity politics? How can one question an individual's understanding of their own happiness or override a society's account of its own rituals? What is wrong with incest? These and other questions about what sustains and threatens our identity are pursued using the resources of philosophy, psychoanalysis, and other disciplines. The discussion throughout is informed and motivated by the Spinozist (...)
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  30. Jerome Neu (1980). Jealous Thoughts. In A. O. Rorty (ed.), Explaining Emotions. Univ of California Pr. 425--463.
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  31. Luci Paul, Mark A. Foss & Mary Ann Baenninger (1996). Double Standards for Sexual Jealousy. Human Nature 7 (3):291-321.
    This work tests two conflicting views about double standards: whether they reflect evolved sex differences in behavior or a manipulative morality serving male interests. Two questionnaires on jealous reactions to mild (flirting) and serious (cheating) sexual transgressions were randomly assigned to 172 young women and men. One questionnaire assessed standards for appropriate behavior and perceptions of how young women and men usually react. The second asked people to report how they had reacted or, if naive, how they would react. The (...)
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  32. Luke Purshouse (2004). Jealousy in Relation to Envy. Erkenntnis 60 (2):179-205.
    The conceptions of jealousy used by philosophical writers are various, and, this paper suggests, largely inadequate. In particular, the difference between jealousy and envy has not yet been plausibly specified. This paper surveys some past analyses of this distinction and addresses problems with them, before proposing its own positive account of jealousy, developed from an idea of Leila Tov-Ruach(a.k.a. A. O. Rorty). Three conditions for being jealous are proposed and it is shownhow each of them helps to tell the emotion (...)
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  33. Colin Radford (1995). Fiction, Pity, Fear, and Jealousy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (1):71-75.
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  34. S. Richmond (2005). Kristjan Kristjansson, Justifying Emotions: Pride and Jealousy. European Journal of Philosophy 13 (1).
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  35. John Sabini & Maury Silver (2005). Ekman's Basic Emotions: Why Not Love and Jealousy? Cognition and Emotion 19 (5):693-712.
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  36. John Sabini & Maury Silver (2005). Gender and Jealousy: Stories of Infidelity. Cognition and Emotion 19 (5):713-727.
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  37. Ed Sanders (2014). Envy and Jealousy in Classical Athens: A Socio-Psychological Approach. Oup Usa.
    Envy and Jealousy in Classical Athens examines the sensation, expression, and literary representation of envy and jealousy in Classical Athens.
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  38. Lucas D. Schipper, Judith A. Easton & Todd K. Shackelford (2006). Morbid Jealousy as a Function of Fitness-Related Life-Cycle Dimensions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):630-630.
    We suggest that morbid jealousy falls on the extreme end of a jealousy continuum. Thus, many features associated with normal jealousy will be present in individuals diagnosed with morbid jealousy. We apply Boyer & Lienard's (B&L's) prediction one (P1; target article, sect. 7.1) to morbid jealousy, suggesting that fitness-related life-cycle dimensions predict sensitivity to cues, and frequency, intensity, and content of intrusive thoughts of partner infidelity. (Published Online February 8 2007).
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  39. Neven Sesardic (2003). Evolution of Human Jealousy a Just-so Story or a Just-so Criticism? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (4):427-443.
    To operationalize the methodological assessment of evolutionary psychology, three requirements are proposed that, if satisfied, would show that a hypothesis is not a just-so story: (1) theoretical entrenchment (i.e., that the hypothesis under consideration is a consequence of a more fundamental theory that is empirically well-confirmed across a very wide range of phenomena), (2) predictive success (i.e., that the hypothesis generates concrete predictions that make it testable and eventually to a certain extent corroborated), and (3) failure of rival explanations (i.e., (...)
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  40. Todd K. Shackelford, Martin Voracek, David P. Schmitt, David M. Buss, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford & Richard L. Michalski (2004). Romantic Jealousy in Early Adulthood and in Later Life. Human Nature 15 (3):283-300.
    Young men are more distressed by a partner’s sexual infidelity, whereas young women are more distressed by a partner’s emotional infidelity. The present research investigated (a) whether the sex difference in jealousy replicates in an older sample, and (b) whether younger people differ from older people in their selection of the more distressing infidelity scenario. We presented forced-choice dilemmas to 202 older people (mean age = 67 years) and to 234 younger people (mean age = 20 years). The sex difference (...)
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  41. Katherine Hanson Sobraske, James S. Boster & Steven J. Gaulin (2013). Mapping the Conceptual Space of Jealousy. Ethos 41 (3):249-270.
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  42. Robert C. Solomon (2007). True To Our Feelings: What Our Emotions Are Really Telling Us. Oxford University Press.
    We live our lives through our emotions, writes Robert Solomon, and it is our emotions that give our lives meaning. What interests or fascinates us, who we love, what angers us, what moves us, what bores us--all of this defines us, gives us character, constitutes who we are. In True to Our Feelings, Solomon illuminates the rich life of the emotions--why we don't really understand them, what they really are, and how they make us human and give meaning to life. (...)
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  43. Irene Switankowsky (2004). Justifying Emotions: Pride and Jealousy Kristján Kristjánsson Routledge Studies in Ethics and Moral Theory New York: Routledge, 2002, Xii + 257 Pp., $120.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 43 (02):404-.
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  44. G. Taylor (1975). Justifying the Emotions. Mind 84 (July):390-402.
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  45. Gabriele Taylor (1988). Envy and Jealousy: Emotions and Vices. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 13 (1):233-249.
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  46. Hubert Tellenbach (1974). On the Nature of Jealousy. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 4 (2):461-468.
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  47. Leila Tov-Ruach (1980). Jealousy, Attention and Loss. In A. O. Rorty (ed.), Explaining Emotions. Univ of California Pr. 465--488.
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  48. Michael J. Wreen (1989). Jealousy. Noûs 23 (5):635-652.
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