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Jean-Paul Sartre

Edited by Matthew Eshleman (University of North Carolina at Wilmington)
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  1. Mitchell Aboulafia (2010). Transcendence: On Self-Determination and Cosmopolitanism. Stanford University Press.
    Don't fence me in : Rorty and Sartre -- On freedom and action : Dewey and Sartre -- A (neo) American in Paris : Bourdieu and Mead -- Mead on cosmopolitanism, sympathy, and war -- W.E.B. Du Bois : double-consciousness, Jamesian sympathy, and the cosmopolitan -- Self-concept in the new sociology of ideas : reflections on Neil Gross's Richard Rorty : the making of an American philosopher -- Eros and self-determination -- What if Hegel's master and slave were women?
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  2. Mitchell Aboulafia (1986). Mead, Sartre: Self, Object, and Reflection. Philosophy and Social Criticism 11 (2):63-86.
    Sartre seeks both to overcome solipsism and clarify how the individual becomes an object—with a seemingly fixed char acter—through his account of The Look in Being and Nothingness. While his description of how The Look of the other transforms one into an object may at first appear to be confirmed by experience, the account proves to be inade quate as a refutation of solipsism and in showing exactly how one becomes an object. On the other hand, G.H. Mead has a (...)
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  3. Mitchell Aboulafia (1986). The Mediating Self: Mead, Sartre, and Self-Determination. Yale University Press.
  4. M. M. Agrawal (1991). Consciousness and the Integrated Being: Sartre and Krishnamurti. Indian Institute of Advanced Study and National Pub. House, New Delhi.
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  5. M. M. Agrawal (1988). Sartre on Pre-Reflective Consciousness. Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research (September-December) 121 (September-December):121-127.
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  6. Tofig Ahmadov (2008). Svasamvittih/Svasamvedana In the Light of Sartre's Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:55-61.
    Sartre posited a (nondual), nonreflexive, nonthetic, nonpositional awareness which makes all consciousness possible, and which underlies dualistic, thetic, positional consciousness of object. Though his description assumes dualistic, thetic, positional consciousness of object to be inherent in nondual, nonreflexive,nonthetic, nonpositional awareness and hence to be ineradicable, with some modifications it can explain the view of rdzogs-chen that the sems-sde series of teachings illustrate in nonphilosophical terms with the example of the primordial mirror in which both dualistic consciousness and its objects manifest (...)
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  7. George Allan (1979). Sartre's Constriction of the Marxist Dialectic. Review of Metaphysics 33 (1):87 - 108.
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  8. Matthew C. Ally (2012). Reading Catalano's Reading Sartre. Sartre Studies International 17 (2):81-88.
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  9. Matthew C. Ally (2011). Sartre's Integrative Method: Description, Dialectics, and Praxis. Sartre Studies International 16 (2):48-74.
    This essay revisits the question of Sartre's method with particular emphasis on the posthumously published Notebooks for an Ethics , Critique of Dialectical Reason ( Volume II ), and “Morale et histoire.” I argue that Sartre's method—an ever-evolving though never seamless blend of phenomenological description, dialectical analysis, and logical inference—is at once the seed and fruit of his mature ontology of praxis. Free organic praxis, what Sartre more than once calls “the human act,” is neither closed nor integral, but is (...)
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  10. Matthew C. Ally (2003). Sartre's Wagers - Humanism, Solidarity, Liberation. Sartre Studies International 9 (2):68-76.
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  11. Matthew C. Ally (2000). Normative Inertia, Historical Momentum and Moral Invention. Sartre Studies International 6 (1):105-115.
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  12. Van Meter Ames (1956). Mead and Sartre on Man. Journal of Philosophy 53 (6):205 - 219.
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  13. Van Meter Ames (1950). Fetishism in the Existentialism of Sartre. Journal of Philosophy 47 (14):407 - 411.
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  14. Meter Amevans (1956). Mead and Sartre on Man. Journal of Philosophy 53 (6):205-219.
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  15. Meter Amevans (1950). Fetishism in the Existentialism of Sartre. Journal of Philosophy 47 (14):407-411.
  16. Kenneth L. Anderson (1996). Sartre's Early Theory of Language. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 70 (4):485-505.
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  17. Thomas C. Anderson (1996). Sartre and Human Nature. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 70 (4):585-595.
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  18. Robert Z. Apostol (1974). Sartre. International Philosophical Quarterly 14 (1):129-131.
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  19. Richard E. Aquila (1977). Two Problems of Being and Nonbeing in Sartre's Being and Nothingness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (2):167-186.
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  20. David Archard (1980). Marxism and Existentialism: The Political Philosophy of Sartre and Merleau-Ponty. Blackstaff Press.
  21. David Archard, Marxism and Existentialism, the Political Philosophy of Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty.
  22. Raymond Aron (1975). History and the Dialectic of Violence: An Analysis of Sartre's Critique De La Raison Dialectique. Blackwell.
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  23. R. Aronson (1972). Interpreting Husserl and Heidegger: The Root of Sartre's Thought. Telos 1972 (13):47-67.
  24. Ronald Aronson (2011). Celebrating the Critique's Fiftieth Anniversary. Sartre Studies International 16 (2):1-16.
    When published, Sartre's Critique of Dialectical Reason appeared to be a major intellectual and political event, no less than a Kantian effort to found Marxism, with far-reaching theoretical and political consequences. Claude Levi-Strauss devoted a course to studying it, and debated Sartre's main points in The Savage Mind ; Andre Gorz devoted a major article to explaining its importance and key concepts in New Left Review . Many analysts of the May, 1968 events in Paris claimed that they were anticipated (...)
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  25. Ronald Aronson (2011). Living Without God: Reply to Comments. Sartre Studies International 16 (2):107-113.
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  26. Ronald Aronson (2005). Camus Versus Sartre: The Unresolved Conflict. Sartre Studies International 11 (s 1-2):302-310.
    By what incredible foresight did the most significant intellectual quarrel of the twentieth century anticipate the major issue of the twenty-first? When Camus and Sartre parted ways in 1952, the main question dividing them was political violence—specifically, that of communism. And as they continued to jibe at each other during the next decade, especially during the war in Algeria, one of the major issues between them became terrorism. The 1957 and 1964 Nobel Laureates were divided sharply over which violence most (...)
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  27. Ronald Aronson (2005). Sartre contre Camus : le conflit jamais résolu. Cités 22 (2):53.
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  28. Ronald Aronson (2004). Camus & Sartre: The Story of a Friendship and the Quarrel That Ended It. University of Chicago Press.
    Until now it has been impossible to read the full story of the relationship between Albert Camus and Jean-Paul Sartre. Their dramatic rupture at the height of the Cold War, like that conflict itself, demanded those caught in its wake to take sides rather than to appreciate its tragic complexity. Now, using newly available sources, Ronald Aronson offers the first book-length account of the twentieth century's most famous friendship and its end. Albert Camus and Jean-Paul Sartre first met in 1943, (...)
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  29. Ronald Aronson (2001). Sartre, Camus, and the Caliban Articles. Sartre Studies International 7 (2):1-7.
    In October and November, 1948, an exchange on democracy between Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus appeared in Jean Daniel's monthly Caliban. At first glance these articles confirm the prevailing sense that the 1952 split was inevitable. But reading the break back into the relationship presents it with a kind of necessity, corresponding to the law of "analysis after the event" described by Doris Lessing. Inasmuch as it resulted in a break, we are tempted to focus from the start on "the (...)
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  30. Ronald Aronson (2001). Sartre Versus Camus: Towards a Post-Cold War Evaluation. Radical Philosophy Review 4 (1/2):102-116.
    The author argues for a conjunction of Albert Camus’s “idealism” with Jean-Paul Sartre’s “dialectical realism” as a corrective to the limitation of each for the sake of a viable transformative politics.
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  31. Ronald Aronson (1998). Introduction. Sartre Studies International 4 (2):43-44.
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  32. Ronald Aronson (1993). Sartre's Political Theory. Radical Philosophy Review of Books 8 (8):25-29.
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  33. Ronald Aronson (1990). Sartre. Radical Philosophy Review of Books 1 (1):6-12.
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  34. Ronald Aronson (1987). Sartre on Stalin: A Discussion of Critique de la Raison Dialectique, II. Studies in East European Thought 33 (2):131-143.
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  35. Ronald Aronson (1987). Sartre's Second Critique. University of Chicago Press.
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  36. Ronald Aronson (1975). Sartre and the Radical Intellectuals Role. Science and Society 39 (4):436 - 449.
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  37. Ronald Aronson & Andrew Dobson (1997). Discussion of 'Sartre and Stalin'. Sartre Studies International 3 (1):16-21.
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  38. Ronald Aronson, Ronald E. Santoni & Robert Stone (2003). The New Orleans Session— March 2002. Sartre Studies International 9 (2):9-25.
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  39. Margaret Atack (1999). Sartre, May 68 and Literature. Sartre Studies International 5 (1):33-48.
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  40. Antony Aumann (2006). Sartre's View of Kierkegaard as Transhistorical Man. Journal of Philosophical Research 31:361-372.
    This paper illuminates the central arguments in Sartre's UNESCO address, 'The Singular Universal." The address begins by asking whether objective facts tell us everything there is to know about Kierkegaard. Sartre's answer is negative. The question then arises as to whether we can lay hold of Kierkegaard's "irreducible subjectivity" by seeing him as alive for us today, i.e., as transhistorical. Sartre's answer here is affirmative. However, a close inspection of this answer exposes a deeper level to the address. The struggle (...)
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  41. Mary Basil Bacon (1968). Sartre. By Maurice Cranston. The Modern Schoolman 45 (2):181-181.
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  42. Sorin Baiasu (2010). Kant and Sartre: Re-Discovering Critical Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction * Kant and Sartre * Methodology * PART I: KANT * Agency * Identity * Freedom * Autonomy * Normativity * Happiness and Virtue * Moral and Political Knowledge * Action-guiding Criteria * PART II: SARTRE AND KANT * Person * The 'I think' * Psychological Rationalism and Empiricism * Synthesis and Analysis * Freedom * Disposition and Project * Determinism and Arbitrariness * Causation and Projection * Morality *. Imperative and Value * Insensitiveness to (...)
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  43. Sorin Baiasu (2003). The Anxiety of Influence: Sartre's Search for an Ethics and Kant's Moral Theory. Sartre Studies International 9 (1):21-53.
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  44. Robert Baird (2007). The Responsible Self: An Interpretation of Jean-Paul Sartre. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 14 (1):144-152.
    Struggle with self identity is a life-Iong moral undertaking, an essential dimension of which is connecting one’s past and future in a way that preserves integrity and wholeness. The argument of this paper is that one reading of Sartre’s understanding of bad faith and authenticity can illuminate this project. More specifically, the essay provides an interpretation of Sartre’s claim that “I am not what I am and I am what Iam not” that avoids understanding the self as an ontological nothingness (...)
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  45. Thomas Baldwin (1996). Two Approaches to Sartre. European Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):81-92.
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  46. Thomas Baldwin (1979). The Original Choice in Sartre and Kant. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 80:31 - 44.
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  47. Johannes Balthasar (1989). Jean-Paul Sartre. Writer or Philosopher? Philosophy and History 22 (2):165-166.
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  48. Robyn A. Bantel (1981). The Experiences of Nausea and Adventure: An Analysis of the Opposition of Existence and Being in Sartre's Nausea. Research in Phenomenology 11 (1):25-40.
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  49. Robyn A. Bantel (1979). The Haunting Image of the Absolute in the Work of Sartre. Research in Phenomenology 9 (1):182-197.
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  50. Michael D. Barber (2001). Sartre, Phenomenology and the Subjective Approach to Race and Ethnicity in Black Orpheus. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (3):91-103.
    While Appiah and Soyinka criticize racial essentializing in Sartre and the Negritude poets, Sartre in Black Orpheus interprets the Negritudinists as employing a phenomenological, anamnestic retrieval of subjective experience. This retrieval uncovers two ethical attitudes: a less exploitative approach toward nature, and a conversion of slavery’s suffering into a stimulus for universal liberation. These attitudes spring from peasant cultural traditions and ethical responses to others’ race-based cruelty, rather than emanating from mystified ‘blackness’. Alfred Schutz’s because-motive analysis, a process of narrative (...)
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