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  1. L. M. A. De (1971). L'Idée d'Expérience Dans la Philosophie de John Dewey. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 24 (3):539-540.
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  2. F. G. A. (1965). John Dewey and the World View. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 18 (3):597-597.
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  3. S. C. A. (1973). John Dewey's Philosophy of Value. Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):385-385.
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  4. S. C. A. (1973). John Dewey's Philosophy of Value. Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):385-385.
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  5. S. C. A. (1973). John Dewey’s Philosophy of Value. Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):385-385.
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  6. George E. Abaunza, Making Artists of Us All: The Evolution of an Educational Aesthetic.
    The history of philosophy is replete with attempts at invoking rationality as a means of directing and even subduing human desire and emotion. Understood as that which moves human beings to action, desire and emotion come to be associated with human freedom and rationality as a means of curbing that freedom. Plato, for instance, takes for granted a separation between thought and action that drives a wedge between our rational ability to exercise self-discipline and the free expression of desire and (...)
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  7. Metwally Ahmed Abou-Omar (1984). The Relevance of John Dewey's Problem Solving Method for Adult Education.
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  8. Mitchell Aboulafia (1992). The Ideal of Democracy, on John Dewey and American Democracy. [REVIEW] American Quarterly 44 (2).
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  9. George P. Adams (1934). Book Review:Philosophy and Civilization. John Dewey. [REVIEW] Ethics 44 (2):269-.
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  10. George P. Adams (1926). Book Review: John Dewey, Experience and Nature. [REVIEW] Ethics 36 (2):201-.
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  11. J. W. L. Adams & Paul K. Crosser (1956). The Nihilism of John Dewey. Philosophical Quarterly 6 (24):276.
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  12. Felix Adler, Edward Scribner Ames, Albert G. A. Balz, Harold Chapman Brown & Edwin A. Burtt (1929). Essays in Honor of John Dewey on the Occasion of His Seventieth Birthday October 20, 1929. Holt.
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  13. Ronald Guy Aichele (1971). John Dewey's 'Democracy and Education': From a Logical Point of View. Dissertation, University of Missouri - Columbia
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  14. Scott F. Aikin (2012). John Dewey's Quest for Unity By Richard Gale. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (2):242-245.
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  15. Scott F. Aikin (2012). John Dewey's Quest for Unity (Review). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (2):242-245.
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  16. Scott F. Aikin (2010). John Dewey's Quest for Unity: The Journey of a Promethean Mystic (Review). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (4):656-659.
    There is what should be called the Curious George Model of Analysis, wherein the internal conflicts of some protagonist or program are the most revealing and significant features of the story. Take George. He is a good little monkey, but he's curious. These are virtues of sorts, but George's curiosity drives him first to investigate a yellow hat, then to try to fly like the seagulls, to investigate the telephone, and finally to try holding a large bunch of balloons. In (...)
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  17. Scott F. Aikin (2010). John Dewey's Quest for Unity: The Journey of a Promethean Mystic By Richard Gale. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (4):656-659.
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  18. Scott F. Aikin & Michael P. Hodges (2006). Wittgenstein, Dewey, and the Possibility of Religion. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (1):1-19.
    John Dewey points out in A Common Faith (1934) that what stands in the way of religious belief for many is the apparent commitment of Western religious traditions to supernatural phenomena and questionable historical claims. We are to accept claims that in any other context we would find laughable. Are we to believe that water can be turned into wine without the benefit of the fermentation process? Are we to swallow the claim that there is such a phenomenon as the (...)
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  19. Gregory Aisemberg (2014). Dewey's Naturalistic Mysticism of Meaning: Finite Transcendence. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 28 (2):130-153.
    In describing the mystical as a swift and progressive obliteration of empirical individuality and its history, of sensation, of time and space, and of the world’s multiplicity of forms, the otherworldly mystic grossly distorts the experience by interpretive tropes that uproot it from its animal soil of impulse and habit, of human perspective, and attribute its genesis to the intermediation of supernatural factors in order to account for its simplest rudiments. What is presupposed in otherworldly interpretations is that sense experience (...)
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  20. Lewis E. Akeley (1934). The Problematic Situation. Its Symbolization and Meanings. Journal of Philosophy 31 (25):673-681.
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  21. V. N. Akulinin & O. V. Samylov (1994). Filosofskoe Obshchestvo Pri S.-Peterburgskom Universitete 1897-1923. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  22. Virgil C. Aldrich (1944). John Dewey's Use of Language. Journal of Philosophy 41 (10):261-271.
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  23. H. B. Alexander (1919). Dewey's Lectures in Japan. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (13):358.
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  24. Thomas Alexander (2010). The Being of Nature: Dewey, Buchler, and the Prospect for an Eco-Ontology. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (4):544-569.
    American philosophy has been dominated by the theme of "Nature."1 From Edwards to Emerson to Dewey to Dennett, American thought has variously invoked Nature. But to articulate a philosophy of Nature is not thereby to espouse a form of "naturalism." In fact, philosophies undertaken in the name of "naturalism" seem to have a different temperament than those that begin with the thought of Nature as such. As a theme, "Nature" invites an expansive mood for reflection, while "naturalism" sounds constrictive and (...)
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  25. Thomas Alexander (2008). Comments on James Good, a Search for Unity in Diversity. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (4):pp. 563-568.
    While Good’s book forces us to recognize the caricatures of Hegel and idealism that have dominated Anglo-American thought, Dewey’s relationship with idealism in general and Hegel in particular remains complex. Good proposes that the main reason for Dewey’s rejection of idealism was World War I. I find this implausible. Good downplays the central influence of James on Dewey, first with the Principles and then with his radical empiricism. By his move to Columbia in 1905 and in his article of that (...)
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  26. Thomas Alexander (2002). The Aesthetics of Reality : The Development of Dewey's Ecological Theory of Experience. In F. Thomas Burke, D. Micah Hester & Robert B. Talisse (eds.), Dewey's Logical Theory: New Studies and Interpretations. Vanderbilt University Press 3--26.
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  27. Thomas Alexander (1980). Richard Rorty And Dewey's Metaphysics Of Experience. Southwest Philosophical Studies 5.
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  28. Thomas Alexander (1979). The Pepper Croce Thesis And Dewey's "iDEALIST" Aesthetics. Southwest Philosophical Studies 4.
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  29. Thomas M. Alexander (2013). John Dewey's Uncommon Faith. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (2):347-362.
    Dewey’s A Common Faith has been variously interpreted, both in terms of its relation to Dewey’s corpus and internally in terms of its leading ideas. I argue for its crucial relevance in understanding Dewey and undertake an analysis of the key idea of “religious experience” as an “attitude of existence.” This distinguishes religious experience from other types of qualitative experience and shows the unique place this concept has for Dewey.
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  30. Thomas M. Alexander (2006). Dewey, Dualism, and Naturalism. In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Blackwell Pub.
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  31. Thomas M. Alexander (1993). John Dewey and American Democracy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (1):150-152.
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  32. Thomas M. Alexander (1987). John Dewey's Theory of Art, Experience, and Nature: The Horizons of Feeling. State University of New York Press.
    Thomas Alexander shows that the primary, guiding concern of Dewey's philosophy is his theory of aesthetic experience.
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  33. Thomas Milton Alexander (1984). John Dewey's Theory of Aesthetic Meaning. Dissertation, Emory University
    Dewey's mature philosophy places aesthetics in a central role. Dewey's own aesthetic theory has been charged by Stephen Pepper, Benedetto Croce, and others as being an inconsistent intrusion of idealism into Dewey's naturalistic instrumentalism. "The Pepper-Croce Thesis" focuses in particular on Dewey's concept of aesthetic meaning, which seems at once to maintain that meaning, which is relational and mediatory, can also be qualitative and immediate. Art, for Dewey, is expressive and communicative of meaning. Instead of dismissing Dewey's views as contradictory, (...)
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  34. George Allan (2004). Whitehead and Dewey: Religion in the Making of Education. In Janusz A. Polanowski & Donald W. Sherburne (eds.), Whitehead's Philosophy: Points of Connection. State University of New York Press 41.
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  35. Cristina Allemann-Ghionda (2000). Dewey in Postwar-Italy: The Case of Re-Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (1):53-67.
    After the end of the Second World War, Italy was thefirst Axis country (followed by Germany and Japan), toundergo a process of ``reeducation'' by the alliedtroops, focusing initially on the education system.Under the direction of American scholars and schoolinnovators, school syllabi and textbooks wererewritten in order to replace the ideologicalindoctrination exerted by the Fascist regime from 1923to 1943 with democratic ideas. This articlereconstructs different phases of the influence of JohnDewey's progressive education in Italy. This influencewas predominant in policy and experimental (...)
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  36. Eric Alliez & Jean-Claude Bonne (2009). Matisse with Dewey with Deleuze. In Eugene W. Holland, Daniel W. Smith & Charles J. Stivale (eds.), Gilles Deleuze: Image and Text. Continuum
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  37. Andrew Altman (1982). John Dewey and Contemporary Normative Ethics. Metaphilosophy 13 (2):149–160.
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  38. Meter Amevans (1953). John Dewey as Aesthetician. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 12 (2):145-168.
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  39. Archibald I. Anderson (1960). Milestones of Educational Progress: Horace Mann, 1796?1859; John Dewey, 1859?1952. Educational Theory 10 (1):1-8.
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  40. Douglas R. Anderson (2006). Review: Frank M. Oppenheim, S.J. Reverence for the Relations of Life: Re-Imagining Pragmatism Via Josiah Royce's Interactions with Peirce, James, and Dewey. South Bend: University of Notre Dame Press, 2005. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):150-153.
  41. Douglas R. Anderson (2005). The Grace and the Severity of the Ideal: John Dewey and the Transcendent (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (3):280-283.
    In The Grace and the Severity of the Ideal, Victor Kestenbaum swims against the current of Dewey scholarship. He declares for and gives close articulation to the importance of transcendence in the philosophy of John Dewey. The guiding thread of the book is "the proposal that Dewey never outgrew his idealistic period. His philosophical achievement is not to be located in his naturalism but in the frontiers along which the natural and the transcendental touch" (137). Kestenbaum does not argue that (...)
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  42. Elizabeth Anderson, Dewey's Moral Philosophy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    John Dewey (1859-1952) lived from the Civil War to the Cold War, a period of extraordinary social, economic, demographic, political and technological change. During his lifetime the United States changed from a rural to an urban society, from an agricultural to an industrial economy, from a regional to a world power. It emancipated its slaves, but subjected them to white supremacy. It absorbed millions of immigrants from Europe and Asia, but faced wrenching conflicts between capital and labor as they were (...)
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  43. Emerald Balboa Anderson (1966). Semantic Problems in Dewey's Logic. Dissertation, Syracuse University
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  44. Erik Anderson (2001). Reading Dewey. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 29 (90):19-20.
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  45. Frederick M. Anderson (1967). Dewey's Experiment with Greek Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 7 (1):86-100.
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  46. W. Anderson (1930). On a Fragment From Dewey. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 8 (3):168 – 175.
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  47. Hillary Angelo (2013). Bird in Hand: How Experience Makes Nature. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 42 (4):351-368.
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  48. John P. Anton (1965). John Dewey and Ancient Philosophies. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 25 (4):477-499.
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  49. Morey L. Appell (1988). John Dewey: Pattern for Adventuring. Morey L. Appell Human Relations Foundation.
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  50. Paul Milo Armetta (1975). Epistemological and Axiological Aspects of Communication: As Seen in the Works of G.H. Mead, John Dewey, Hugh Duncan, Emile Durkheim and Karl Popper. [REVIEW] Dissertation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
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1 — 50 / 2023