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  1. S. C. A. (1973). John Dewey's Philosophy of Value. Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):385-385.
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  2. S. C. A. (1973). John Dewey's Philosophy of Value. Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):385-385.
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  3. George P. Adams (1934). Book Review:Philosophy and Civilization. John Dewey. [REVIEW] Ethics 44 (2):269-.
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  4. Scott F. Aikin (2012). John Dewey's Quest for Unity By Richard Gale. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (2):242-245.
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  5. Scott F. Aikin (2010). John Dewey's Quest for Unity: The Journey of a Promethean Mystic (Review). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (4):656-659.
    There is what should be called the Curious George Model of Analysis, wherein the internal conflicts of some protagonist or program are the most revealing and significant features of the story. Take George. He is a good little monkey, but he's curious. These are virtues of sorts, but George's curiosity drives him first to investigate a yellow hat, then to try to fly like the seagulls, to investigate the telephone, and finally to try holding a large bunch of balloons. In (...)
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  6. Scott F. Aikin (2010). John Dewey's Quest for Unity: The Journey of a Promethean Mystic By Richard Gale. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (4):656-659.
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  7. Scott F. Aikin & Michael P. Hodges (2006). Wittgenstein, Dewey, and the Possibility of Religion. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (1):1-19.
    John Dewey points out in A Common Faith (1934) that what stands in the way of religious belief for many is the apparent commitment of Western religious traditions to supernatural phenomena and questionable historical claims. We are to accept claims that in any other context we would find laughable. Are we to believe that water can be turned into wine without the benefit of the fermentation process? Are we to swallow the claim that there is such a phenomenon as the (...)
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  8. Lewis E. Akeley (1934). The Problematic Situation. Its Symbolization and Meanings. Journal of Philosophy 31 (25):673-681.
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  9. Thomas Alexander (2010). The Being of Nature: Dewey, Buchler, and the Prospect for an Eco-Ontology. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (4):544-569.
    American philosophy has been dominated by the theme of "Nature."1 From Edwards to Emerson to Dewey to Dennett, American thought has variously invoked Nature. But to articulate a philosophy of Nature is not thereby to espouse a form of "naturalism." In fact, philosophies undertaken in the name of "naturalism" seem to have a different temperament than those that begin with the thought of Nature as such. As a theme, "Nature" invites an expansive mood for reflection, while "naturalism" sounds constrictive and (...)
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  10. Thomas Alexander (2008). Comments on James Good, a Search for Unity in Diversity. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (4):pp. 563-568.
    While Good’s book forces us to recognize the caricatures of Hegel and idealism that have dominated Anglo-American thought, Dewey’s relationship with idealism in general and Hegel in particular remains complex. Good proposes that the main reason for Dewey’s rejection of idealism was World War I. I find this implausible. Good downplays the central influence of James on Dewey, first with the Principles and then with his radical empiricism. By his move to Columbia in 1905 and in his article of that (...)
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  11. Thomas Alexander (2002). The Aesthetics of Reality : The Development of Dewey's Ecological Theory of Experience. In F. Thomas Burke, D. Micah Hester & Robert B. Talisse (eds.), Dewey's Logical Theory: New Studies and Interpretations. Vanderbilt University Press. 3--26.
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  12. Thomas M. Alexander (2006). Dewey, Dualism, and Naturalism. In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Blackwell Pub..
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  13. Cristina Allemann-Ghionda (2000). Dewey in Postwar-Italy: The Case of Re-Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (1):53-67.
    After the end of the Second World War, Italy was thefirst Axis country (followed by Germany and Japan), toundergo a process of ``reeducation'' by the alliedtroops, focusing initially on the education system.Under the direction of American scholars and schoolinnovators, school syllabi and textbooks wererewritten in order to replace the ideologicalindoctrination exerted by the Fascist regime from 1923to 1943 with democratic ideas. This articlereconstructs different phases of the influence of JohnDewey's progressive education in Italy. This influencewas predominant in policy and experimental (...)
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  14. Eric Alliez & Jean-Claude Bonne (2009). Matisse with Dewey with Deleuze. In Eugene W. Holland, Daniel W. Smith & Charles J. Stivale (eds.), Gilles Deleuze: Image and Text. Continuum.
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  15. Andrew Altman (1982). John Dewey and Contemporary Normative Ethics. Metaphilosophy 13 (2):149–160.
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  16. Meter Amevans (1953). John Dewey as Aesthetician. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 12 (2):145-168.
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  17. Archibald I. Anderson (1960). Milestones of Educational Progress: Horace Mann, 1796?1859; John Dewey, 1859?1952. Educational Theory 10 (1):1-8.
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  18. Douglas R. Anderson (2006). Review: Frank M. Oppenheim, S.J. Reverence for the Relations of Life: Re-Imagining Pragmatism Via Josiah Royce's Interactions with Peirce, James, and Dewey. South Bend: University of Notre Dame Press, 2005. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):150-153.
  19. Douglas R. Anderson (2005). The Grace and the Severity of the Ideal: John Dewey and the Transcendent (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (3):280-283.
    In The Grace and the Severity of the Ideal, Victor Kestenbaum swims against the current of Dewey scholarship. He declares for and gives close articulation to the importance of transcendence in the philosophy of John Dewey. The guiding thread of the book is "the proposal that Dewey never outgrew his idealistic period. His philosophical achievement is not to be located in his naturalism but in the frontiers along which the natural and the transcendental touch" (137). Kestenbaum does not argue that (...)
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  20. Elizabeth Anderson, Dewey's Moral Philosophy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    John Dewey (1859-1952) lived from the Civil War to the Cold War, a period of extraordinary social, economic, demographic, political and technological change. During his lifetime the United States changed from a rural to an urban society, from an agricultural to an industrial economy, from a regional to a world power. It emancipated its slaves, but subjected them to white supremacy. It absorbed millions of immigrants from Europe and Asia, but faced wrenching conflicts between capital and labor as they were (...)
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  21. Erik Anderson (2001). Reading Dewey. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 29 (90):19-20.
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  22. W. Anderson (1930). On a Fragment From Dewey. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 8 (3):168 – 175.
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  23. John P. Anton (1965). John Dewey and Ancient Philosophies. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 25 (4):477-499.
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  24. Morey L. Appell (1988). John Dewey: Pattern for Adventuring. Morey L. Appell Human Relations Foundation.
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  25. Ruth Arndt (1929). John Dewey's Philosophy of Education. Pretoria, J. L. Van Schaik, Ltd..
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  26. Donald Arnstine (1997). Three on Dewey. Educational Theory 47 (4):513-525.
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  27. Dennis Attick & Deron Boyles (2010). Montessori, Dewey, and Capitalism: Educational Theory for a Free Market in Education. Education and Culture 26 (1):100-103.
    Jerry Kirkpatrick's Montessori, Dewey, and Capitalism: Educational Theory for a Free Market in Education presents a provocative synthesis of the educational philosophies of Maria Montessori and John Dewey with the economic philosophies of Ayn Rand and Ludwig Von Mises. At the center of Kirkpatrick's thesis is his belief that public education be subject to a free-market model. Kirkpatrick holds that students can thrive in an educational system free from all forms of coercion, something he believes can only be accomplished in (...)
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  28. RandalI E. Auxier (1990). Dewey on Religion and History. Southwest Philosophy Review 6 (1):45-58.
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  29. Randall E. Auxier (2002). Foucault, Dewey, and the History of the Present. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 16 (2):75-102.
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  30. Guy Axtell (2003). Review of Rosenbaum. [REVIEW] Contemporary Pragmatism:178-187.
    There are many books on the market about religion in American thought and history, but the idea for a collection of essays focused directly upon pragmatist reconstructions of religious belief and sentiment is overdue. Stuart Rosenbaum’s reader admirably fills this need, and is bound to bring fresh insights to students and advanced researchers alike.
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  31. Guy Axtell, Utilitarianism and Dewey's “Three Independent Factors in Morals”.
    The centennial of Dewey & Tuft’s Ethics (1908) provides a timely opportunity to reflect both on Dewey’s intellectual debt to utilitarian thought, and on his critique of it. In this paper I examine Dewey’s assessment of utilitarianism, but also his developing view of the good (ends; consequences), the right (rules; obligations) and the virtuous (approbations; standards) as “three independent factors in morals.” This doctrine (found most clearly in the 2nd edition of 1932) as I argue in the last sections, has (...)
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  32. George E. Axtelle (1963). H. Gordon Hullfish and the John Dewey Society. Educational Theory 13 (3):220-221.
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  33. C. E. Ayres (1930). Philosophy and Genius:Characters and Events John Dewey, Joseph Ratner. Ethics 40 (2):263-.
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  34. C. E. Ayres (1930). Book Review:The Quest for Certainty. John Dewey. [REVIEW] Ethics 40 (3):425-.
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  35. Robert Baird (1970). John Dewey's Two Meta-Ethical Views. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):58-65.
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  36. Charles M. Bakewell (1905). An Open Letter to Professor Dewey Concerning Immediate Empiricism. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 2 (19):520-522.
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  37. John Baldacchino (2008). 'The Power to Develop Dispositions': Revisiting John Dewey's Democratic Claims for Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (1):149-163.
    This article reviews John Dewey and Our Educational Prospect, A Critical Engagement with Dewey's Democracy and Education, edited and spearheaded by David T. Hansen, with contributions by Gert Biesta, Reba N. Page, Larry A. Hickman, Naoko Saito, Gary D. Fenstermacher, Herbert M. Kliebard, Sharon Fieman-Nemser and Elizabeth Minnich. This review will not only praise and evaluate the merits of this book, but will also attempt to frame this new study of Dewey within the challenges that continue to engage education in (...)
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  38. Edward G. Ballard (1955). An Estimate of Dewey's Art as Experience. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 4:5-18.
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  39. Albert G. A. Balz & John Dewey (1949). A Letter to Mr. Dewey Concerning John Dewey's Doctrine of Possibility, Published Together with His Reply. Journal of Philosophy 46 (11):313-342.
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  40. Nathaniel Barrett (2009). Review of Jessica Ching-Sze Wang, John Dewey in China: To Teach and to Learn. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (3):331-333.
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  41. Robert M. Barry (1961). John Dewey. The Modern Schoolman 38 (3):253-254.
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  42. L. A. Barth (1963). American Pragmatism: Peirce, James, and Dewey. The Modern Schoolman 40 (4):406-409.
  43. Scott Bartlett (2000). Habermas and Dewey on Democracy. Southwest Philosophy Review 17 (1):145-152.
  44. Magnus O. Bassey (2009). What Would John Dewey Say About the Educational Metamorphoses of Malcolm X? Education and Culture 25 (1):pp. 52-60.
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  45. John J. Battle (1951). The Metaphysical Presuppositions of the Philosophy of John Dewey. Fribourg.
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  46. Maurice Baum (1928). A Comparative Study of the Philosophies of William James and John Dewey. Thesis: University of Chicago.
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  47. Ernest E. Bayles (1971). Did Dewey Flub One? Educational Theory 21 (4):455-457.
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  48. Monroe C. Beardsley (1965). Intrinsic Value. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 26 (1):1-17.
    Many philosophers apparently still accept the proposition that there is such a thing as intrinsic value, i.e., that some part of the value of some things (objects, events, or states of affairs) is intrinsic value. John Dewey's attack seems not to have dislodged this proposition, for today it is seldom questioned. I propose to press the attack again, in terms that owe a great deal to Dewey, as I understand him.
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  49. R. W. Beardsmore (1992). John Dewey's Theory of Art, Experience and Nature. Idealistic Studies 22 (3):220-221.
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  50. James Behuniak (2010). John Dewey and the Virtue of Cook Ding's Dao. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):161-174.
    Certain discussions about “relativism” in the philosophy of Zhuangzi turn on the question of the morality of his dao 道. Some commentators, most notably Robert Eno, maintain that there is no ethical value whatsoever to Zhuangzi’s dao as presented in the Cook Ding episode and other “knack passages.” In this essay, it is argued that there is indeed a moral dimension to Cook Ding’s dao. One way to recognize it is to explore the similarity between that dao and John Dewey’s (...)
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