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  1. Gender A. Performance (1994). An Interview with Judith Butler». Radical Philosophy 67.
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  2. Stephanie Adair (2011). Unity and Difference: A Critical Appraisal of Polarizing Gender Identities. Hypatia 27 (3):847 - 863.
    In The Phenomenology of Spirit, Hegel draws out the interdependency of unity and difference. In order to have a unity, there must be differences that compose it, as a unity unifies different elements. At the same time, in unifying these elements, they must not cease to be different from one another, as that would reduce the unity to a simple singularity.In this paper, I take up this interdependency of unity and difference, applying it to gender identities. I follow the psychoanalytically (...)
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  3. Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Sandra Lee Bartky, Susan Bordo, Rosi Braidotti, Susan J. Brison, Judith Butler, Drucilla L. Cornell, Deirdre E. Davis, Nancy Fraser, Evelynn M. Hammonds, Nancy J. Hirschmann, Eva Feder Kittay, Sharon Marcus, Marsha Marotta, Julien S. Murphy, Iris MarionYoung & Linda M. G. Zerilli (2002). Gender Struggles: Practical Approaches to Contemporary Feminism. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  4. Amy Allen (2005). “Dependency, Subordination, and Recognition: On Judith Butler's Theory of Subjection”. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):199-222.
    Judith Butler's recent work expands the Foucaultian notion of subjection to encompass an analysis of the ways in which subordinated individuals becomes passionately attached to, and thus come to be psychically invested in, their own subordination. I argue that Butler's psychoanalytically grounded account of subjection offers a compelling diagnosis of how and why an attachment to oppressive norms – of femininity, for example – can persist in the face of rational critique of those norms. However, I also argue that her (...)
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  5. Amy Allen (1998). Power Trouble: Performativity as Critical Theory. Constellations 5 (4):456-471.
    Although Judith Butler’s theory of the performativity of gender has been highly influential in feminist theory, queer theory, cultural studies, and some areas of philosophy, it has yet to receive its due from critical social theorists.1 This oversight is especially problematic given the crucial insights into the study of power – a central concept for critical social theory – that can be gleaned from Butler’s work. Her analysis is somewhat unique among discussions of power in its attempt to theorize simultaneously (...)
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  6. Sonya Andermahr (1997). A Glossary of Feminist Theory. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by St. Martin's Press.
    This glossary is both an introduction to the key words of feminist critical theories and a guide to their origins. Acknowledging the variety of contemporary feminist theories, the glossary includes entries on black, post-colonial, Italian, and French feminisms, and draws on a wide range of fields including semiotics, psychoanalysis, structuralism, poststructuralism, and deconstruction.
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  7. Evelyn Annuß (1998). Judith Butler: Exitable Speech/The Psychic Life of Power. Die Philosophin 21:84-90.
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  8. Evelyn Annuß (1998). Judith Butler: Haß Spricht. Zur Politik des Performativen The Psychic Life of Power. Theories in Subjection. Die Philosophin 9 (17):84-90.
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  9. Pierpaolo Antonello & Roberto Farneti (2009). Antigone's Claim: A Conversation With Judith Butler. Theory and Event 12 (1).
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  10. Anthony Appiah & Henry Louis Gates (eds.) (1995). Identities. University of Chicago Press.
    The study of identity crosses all disciplinary borders to address such issues as the multiple interactions of race, class, and gender in feminist, lesbian, and gay studies, postcolonialism and globalization, and the interrelation of nationalism and ethnicity in ethnic and area studies. Identities will help disrupt the cliche-ridden discourse of identity by exploring the formation of identities and problem of subjectivity. Leading scholars in literary criticism, anthropology, sociology, and philosophy explore such topics as "Gypsies" in the Western imagination, the mobilization (...)
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  11. Barbara Applebaum (2013). Vigilance as a Response to White Complicity. Educational Theory 63 (1):17-34.
    Calls for vigilance have been a recurrent theme in social justice education. Scholars making this call note that vigilance involves a continuous attentiveness, that it presumes some type of criticality, and that it is transformative. In this essay Barbara Applebaum expands upon some of these attributes and calls attention to three particular features of vigilance that, while they may be alluded to in the aforementioned discussions, are rarely made explicit. These three features are critique, staying in the anxiety of critique, (...)
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  12. Ellen Armour (2010). Blinding Me with (Queer) Science: Religion, Sexuality, and (Post?) Modernity. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):107-119.
    This essay brings to bear insights from continental philosophers Michel Foucault and Judith Butler on the science of (homo)sexuality and, more importantly, the desire to use such science to resolve contemporary conflicts over homosexuality’s acceptability. So-called queer science remains deeply beholden to modern notions of sex, gender, and sexuality, the author argues, a schematic that its premodern (Christian) roots further denaturalize. The philosophical insights drawn from this analysis are then applied to the controversy over homosexuality within global Christianity that often (...)
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  13. Alison Assiter (1996). Enlightened Women: Modernist Feminism in a Postmodern Age. Routledge.
    This is a bold and controversial feminist, philosophical critique of postmodernism. While providing a brief and accessible introduction to postmodernist feminist thought, Enlightened Women is also a unique defence of realism and enlightenment philosophy. The first half of the book covers an analysis of some of the most influential postmodernist theorists, such as Luce Irigaray and Judith Butler. In the second half Alison Assiter advocates a return to modernism in feminism. She argues, against the current orthodoxy, that there can be (...)
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  14. Isabel Balza (2013). Tras los monstruos de la biopolítica. Dilemata 12:27-46.
    In this paper I examine the figure of the monster, in both its negative and positive aspects, such as the notion of biopolitics. As a negative figure, the monster would represent the dehumanized subject produced by exclusion mechanisms operating in destructive version of biopolitics, resulting in thanatopolitics, and in this sense provokes horror and abjection. Here I will use the analyses of the anthropological machine (Agamben), the device of the person (Esposito) and indefinite detention (Butler). As a positive figure, the (...)
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  15. Anne Barron (2000). Feminism, Aestheticism and the Limits of Law. Feminist Legal Studies 8 (3):275-317.
    This article seeks to identify and address the normative void that resides at the heart of postmodernist-feminist theory, and to propose a philosophical framework – beyond postmodernism, but incorporating its central insights – for thinking through the normative questions with which feminists are inevitably confronted in their engagements with positive law. Two varieties of postmodernist-feminism are identified and critically analysed: the ‘corporeal feminism’ of Elizabeth Grosz and Judith Butler, which seeks to ground feminist critical practice in the irruptive capacities of (...)
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  16. P. Barsa (1999). Judith Butler the Theory of Performative Gender and the Dilemma of Contemporary Feminism. Filosoficky Casopis 47 (5):772-785.
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  17. Lauren Swayne Barthold (2014). True Identities: From Performativity to Festival. Hypatia 29 (4):808-823.
    Some feminists have criticized Judith Butler's theory of performativity for providing an insufficient account of agency. In this article I first defend her against such charges by appealing to two themes central to Hans-Georg Gadamer's hermeneutics. I compare her emphasis on the sociohistorical nature of agency with Gadamer's insistence on the historical nature of knowledge, and I examine the significance Butler assigns to repetition and note its affinities with Gadamer's conception of play. In the final part of the article I (...)
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  18. Christine Battersby (1998). The Phenomenal Woman: Feminist Metaphysics and the Patterns of Identity. Routledge.
    Christine Battersby rethinks questions of embodiment, essence, sameness and difference, self and "other", patriarchy and power. Using analyses of Kant, Adorno, Irigaray, Butler, Kierkegaard and Deleuze, she challenges those who argue that a feminist metaphysics is a a contradiction in terms. This book explores place for a metaphysics of fluidity in the current debates concerning postmodernism, feminism and identity politics.
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  19. Nancy Bauer (2007). The Second Feminism. Symposia on Gender, Race, and Philosophy.
  20. Jeffrey A. Bell, Vikki Bell, Judith Butler, Jeremy D. Fackenthal, Kirsten M. Gerdes, Sigridur Guðmarsdóttir, Catherine Keller, Matthew S. LoPresti, Astrid Lorange, Randy Ramal & Alan Van Wyk (2012). Butler on Whitehead: On the Occasion. Lexington Books.
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  21. V. Bell (2010). New Scenes of Vulnerability, Agency and Plurality: An Interview with Judith Butler. Theory, Culture and Society 27 (1):130-152.
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  22. V. Bell (2009). Book Review: Who Sings the Nation-State?: Judith Butler and Gayatri Spivak Calcutta, New York, Oxford: Seagull Books, 2007, Pp. 121. [REVIEW] Theory, Culture and Society 26 (5):151-156.
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  23. V. Bell (1999). On Speech, Race and Melancholia: An Interview with Judith Butler. Theory, Culture and Society 16 (2):163-174.
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  24. V. Bell (1999). Mimesis as Cultural Survival: Judith Butler and Anti-Semitism. Theory, Culture and Society 16 (2):133-161.
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  25. Vikki Bell (1999). Feminist Imagination: Genealogies in Feminist Theory. Sage.
    Reading feminist theory as a complex imaginative achievement, Feminist Imagination considers feminist commitment through the interrogation of its philosophical, political and affective connections with the past, and especially with the `race' trials of the twentieth century. The book looks at: the 'directionlessness' of contemporary feminist thought; the question of essentialism and embodiment; the racial tensions in the work of Simone de Beauvoir; the totalitarian character in Hannah Arendt; the 'mimetic Jew' and the concept of mimesis in the work of Judith (...)
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  26. Benita Benéitez (2006). Judith Butler: Lenguaje, Poder E Identidad. Síntesis, Madrid, 2004. Foro Interno. Anuario de Teoría Política 6:181-183.
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  27. Seyla Benhabib (2013). Ethics Without Normativity and Politics Without Historicity On Judith Butler's Parting Ways. Jewishness and the Critique of Zionism. Constellations 20 (1):150-163.
  28. Seyla Benhabib & Judith Butler (1995). Drucilla Cornell, and Nancy Fraser. In , Feminist Contentions: A Philosophical Exchange. Routledge.
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  29. Debra Bergoffen (2003). Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body. Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
    On February 22, 2001, three Bosnian Serb soldiers were found guilty of crimes against humanity. Their offense? Rape. This is the first time that rape has been prosecuted and condemned as a crime against humanity. Appealing to Jacques Derrida's democracy of the perhaps and Judith Butler's politics of performative contradiction, I see this judgment inaugurating a politics of the vulnerable body which challenges current understandings of evil, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.
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  30. Debra B. Bergoffen (2003). February 22, 2001: Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body. Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
    : On February 22, 2001, three Bosnian Serb soldiers were found guilty of crimes against humanity. Their offense? Rape. This is the first time that rape has been prosecuted and condemned as a crime against humanity. Appealing to Jacques Derrida's democracy of the perhaps and Judith Butler's politics of performative contradiction, I see this judgment inaugurating a politics of the vulnerable body which challenges current understandings of evil, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.
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  31. Debra B. Bergoffen (1996). Phallic Queerings: Queering the Phallus: Cixous, Irigaray, and Butler. Philosophy Today 40 (1):206-210.
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  32. Lorenzo Bernini & Olivia Guaraldo (eds.) (2009). Differenza E Relazione: L'Ontologia Dell'umano Nel Pensiero di Judith Butler E Adriana Cavarero: Con Un Dialogo Tra le Due Filosofe. Ombre Corte.
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  33. Georg W. Bertram & Robin Celikates (2013). Towards a Conflict Theory of Recognition: On the Constitution of Relations of Recognition in Conflict. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (3).
    In this paper, we develop an understanding of recognition in terms of individuals’ capacity for conflict. Our goal is to overcome various shortcomings that can be found in both the positive and negative conceptions of recognition. We start by analyzing paradigmatic instances of such conceptions—namely, those put forward by Axel Honneth and Judith Butler. We do so in order to show how both positions are inadequate in their elaborations of recognition in an analogous way: Both fail to make intelligible the (...)
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  34. Monika Bobako (2005). Seyla Benhabib versus Judith Butler: spór o podmiot i emancypację (wersja feministyczna). Principia.
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  35. Roland Boer (2011). Judith Butler, Jürgen Habermas, Charles Taylor and Cornell West, The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere. Radical Philosophy 170:51.
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  36. Tom Boland (2007). Critique as a Technique of Self: A Butlerian Analysis of Judith Butler's Prefaces. History of the Human Sciences 20 (3):105-122.
    This article considers `critique' as performative, being on the one hand a reiterative performance, that enacts the `critic' through the act of critique, and on the other hand reflecting the constitution of the subject. While this approach takes on the conceptual framework of Judith Butler's work, it differs by refusing critique — or its correlates; parody, subversion or similar — any special status. Like any other performance critique is taken here as a cultural practice, as a Foucauldian `technique of self', (...)
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  37. Jonathan Bollen (2007). Dressing Up and Growing Up : Rehearsals on the Threshold of Intelligibility. In Judith Butler & Bronwyn Davies (eds.), Judith Butler in Conversation: Analyzing the Texts and Talk of Everyday Life. Routledge.
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  38. Barbara Bolt (2004). Art Beyond Representation: The Performative Power of the Image. I.B. Tauris.
    Refuting the assumption that art is a representational practice, Bolt's striking argument engages with the work of Heidegger, Deleuze and Guattari, C.S.Peirce and Judith Butler to argue for a performative relationship between art and artist. Drawing on themes as diverse as the work of Cezanne and of Francis Bacon, the transubstantiation of the Catholic sacrament and Wilde's novel The Picture of Dorian Gray , she challenges the metaphor of light as enlightenment, reconceiving this revealing light as the blinding glare of (...)
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  39. Janet Borgerson (2005). Judith Butler: On Organizing Subjectivities. Sociological Review 53:63-79.
    In this essay, I evoke and explore Butler's potential contribution, providing a broad framework for her work, and, at the same time, focusing on specific concepts from her writings - performativity, iteration, and foreclosure - that have profound implications for researchers. Furthermore, pointing out philosophers working in the phenomenological tradition in which Butler trained, including influential precursors, colleagues, and contemporaries, establishes how issues raised in various fields can be recognized and comprehended in relation to Butler's work more generally. Butler's work (...)
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  40. Geoff Boucher (2006). The Politics of Performativity: A Critique of Judith Butler. Parrhesia 1:112-141.
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  41. Geoff Boucher (2005). One Hand Clapping: The Phoneme and the Nothing. Filozofski Vestnik 2 (2):83-93.
    In Écrits, Lacan proposes an "unthinkable list" of objects (a) that includes "the phoneme, the gaze, the voice – the nothing". While the gaze and the voice have received extensive critical commentary, the phoneme and the nothing have gone practically unnoticed. I propose to theoretically construct the object (a) by means of an explication of Lacan’s enigmatic allusion to the phoneme and the nothing. I contend that the phoneme is the "ur-form" of the object (a), whose ontological status is nothing. (...)
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  42. Geoff Boucher (2004). Judith Butler's Postmodern Existentialism : A Critical Analysis. Philosophy Today 48 (4):355-369.
    Bucher ascertains that Butler's description of the temporalized process of structuration, which seeks to avoid recourse to political voluntarism, or the sovereign intentionality of the autonomous individual, yields powerful insights into social identity. He asserts further that Butler's description of the dominant heterosexual culture in terms of melancholia, and her insights into the structures of repetition and difference that make up the social conventions that produce cultural norms, represent important resources in thinking about contemporary cultural conflicts.
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  43. Goeff Boucher (2004). Judith Butler's Postmodern Existentialism: A Critical Analysis. Philosophy Today 48 (4):355-369.
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  44. Tracy Bowell, Gary Kemp, Harry Brighouse, Judith Butler & Gender Trouble Feminism (2006). First Page Preview. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (4).
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  45. Malcolm Bowie (2005). Introduction to Judith Butler. In Nicholas Bamforth (ed.), Sex Rights: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 2002. Oup Oxford. 44.
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  46. Anita Brady (2011). Understanding Judith Butler. Sage.
    Subjectivity, identity and desire -- Gender -- Queer -- Symbolic violence -- Ethics.
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  47. Christopher Brooke (2009). Reviews Reification: A New Look at an Old Idea by Axel Honneth, with Judith Butler, Raymond Geuss and Jonathan Lear Edited by Martin Jay Oxford University Press, 2008, 184 Pp., £16.99. [REVIEW] Philosophy 84 (3):441-445.
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  48. Louise Brossard (2005). Trois Perspectives Lesbiennes Féministes Articulant le Sexe, la Sexualité Et les Rapports Sociaux de Sexe: Rich, Wittig, Butler. Institut de Recherches Et d'Études Féministes.
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  49. Adriano Bugliani & Davide Sparti (2007). Critica della violenza etica di Judith Butler. Iride 20 (1):187-194.
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  50. Elvira Burgos Díaz (2002). Judith Butlers Rezeption Im Spanischen Feministischen Denken. Die Philosophin 13 (26):43-56.
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