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Jürgen Habermas

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  1. Farid Abdel-Nour (2004). Farewell to Justification: Habermas, Human Rights, and Universalist Morality. Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (1):73-96.
    In his recent work, Jürgen Habermas signals the abandonment of his earlier claims to justify human rights and universalist morality. This paper explains the above shift, arguing that it is the inescapable result of his attempts in recent years to accommodate pluralism. The paper demonstrates how Habermas’s universal pragmatic justification of modern normative standards was inextricably tied to his consensus theory of validity. He was compelled by the structure of that argument to count on the current or future availability of (...)
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  2. Arash Abizadeh (2007). On the Philosophy/Rhetoric Binaries: Or, is Habermasian Discourse Motivationally Impotent? Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (4):445-472.
    The susceptibility of Habermas' socio-political theory (and notion of constitutional patriotism) to the charge of motivational impotence can be traced to a problem in the way in which he conceives of discursive practical reason. By implicitly constructing the notion of discursive rationality in contrast to, and in abstraction from, the rhetorical and affective components of language use, Habermas' notion of discursive practical reason ends up reiterating the same binaries — between reason and passion, abstract and concrete, universal and particular — (...)
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  3. Arash Abizadeh (2005). In Defence of the Universalization Principle in Discourse Ethics. Philosophical Forum 36 (2):193–211.
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  4. Mitchell Aboulafia, Myra Orbach Bookman & Cathy Kemp (eds.) (2002). Habermas and Pragmatism. Routledge.
    Jürgen Habermas is one of the most important thinkers of this century. His work has been highly influential not only in philosophy, but particularly in the fields of politics, sociology and law. This is the first collection that explores the connections between his body of work and North America's biggest philosophical movement, pragmatism. Habermas and Pragmatism investigates the influences of pragmatism on Habermas' thought in a collection of stellar essays with contributions by Habermas himself, leading representatives of pragmatism, as well (...)
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  5. Carlo Invernizzi Accetti (2010). Can Democracy Emancipate Itself From Political Theology? Habermas and Lefort on the Permanence of the Theologico-Political. Constellations 17 (2):254-270.
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  6. N. Adams (2003). Review Articles : Recent Books in English by Jurgen Habermas: On the Pragmatics of Communication, Edited by Maeve Cooke. Cambridge: Polity, 1998. 454 Pp. Pb. ISBN 0-74563-047-2. The Inclusion of the Other: Studies in Political Theory, Edited by C. Cronin and P. De Grieff. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1998. 300 Pp. Pb. ISBN 0-26258-186-8. The Postnational Constellation: Political Essays, Trans. And Edited by M. Pensky. Cambridge: Polity, 2001. 190 Pp. Pb. ISBN 0-74562- 352-2. The Liberating Power of Symbols: Philosophical Essays, Trans. P. Dews. Cambridge: Polity, 2001. 130 Pp. Pb. ISBN 0-74562-552-5. Religion and Rationality: Essays on Reason, God, and Modernity, Edited by E. Mendieta. Cambridge: Polity, 2002.176 Pp. Pb. ISBN 0-74562- 487-. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 16 (1):72-79.
  7. Nicholas Adams (2006). Habermas and Theology. Cambridge University Press.
    How can the world's religious traditions debate within the public sphere? In this book Nicholas Adams shows the importance of Habermas' approaches to this question. The full range of Habermas' work is considered, with detailed commentary on the more difficult texts. Adams energetically rebuts some of Habermas' arguments, particularly those which postulate the irrationality or stability of religious thought. Members of different religious traditions need to understand their own ethical positions as part of a process of development involving ongoing disagreements, (...)
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  8. Ben Agger (1979). Work and Authority in Marcuse and Habermas. Human Studies 2 (1):191 - 208.
    I have argued that Marcuse's notions of the merger of work and play and of the possibility of nondominating organizational rationality and authority fly in the face of the mainstream Weberian tradition which venerates the labor-leisure dualism and the bureaucratic coordination of labor. I have further argued that this Weberian current is reappropriated by Jürgen Habermas in his own recent work on the epistemological foundations of social science. The counterpoint between Marcuse and Habermas reveals a split within modern critical theory. (...)
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  9. Rolf Ahlers (1975). How Critical is Critical Theory?: Reflections on Jurgen Habermas. Philosophy and Social Criticism 3 (2):119-136.
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  10. I. Ahn (2009). Decolonization of the Lifeworld by Reconstructing the System: A Critical Dialogue Between Jurgen Habermas and Reinhold Niebuhr. Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (3):290-313.
    For all Habermas's remarkable contribution to moral theory, his discourse ethics has left behind some debatable points. In particular, `delinguistified media' such as money and power have been excluded from the domain of moral discourse. The exclusion of money and power from the domain of moral discourse has also motivated Habermas to develop an idea of `colonization of lifeworld by system' by giving us the impression that the delinguistified media are the main culprit of colonizing the lifeworld. In this article, (...)
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  11. Jan Ajzner (1994). Some Problems of Rationality, Understanding, and Universalistic Ethics in the Context of Habermas's Theory of Communicative Action. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 24 (4):466-484.
    The arguments presented in this discussion point to some problems in the theory of communicative action considered as a starting point for a sociological theory with both normative and explanatory aspirations. It is argued that Habermas's notion of consensus is not sufficiently developed to constitute a foundation of the ethics of public debates; that both social action and communicative action are grounded in social actors' references to the same three worlds, which makes the coordination of actions by means of understanding (...)
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  12. Lars Albinus (2013). Can Science Cope with More Than One World? A Cross-Reading of Habermas, Popper, and Searle. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 44 (1):3-20.
    The purpose of this article is to critically assess the ‘three-world theory’ as it is presented—with some slight but decisive differences—by Jürgen Habermas and Karl Popper. This theory presents the philosophy of science with a conceptual and material problem, insofar as it claims that science has no single access to all aspects of the world. Although I will try to demonstrate advantages of Popper’s idea of ‘the third world’ of ideas, the shortcomings of his ontological stance become visible from the (...)
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  13. Robert Alexy (1994). Basic Rights and Democracy in Jurgen Habermas's Procedural Paradigm of the Law. Ratio Juris 7 (2):227-238.
  14. Amy Allen (2012). The Unforced Force of the Better Argument: Reason and Power in Habermas' Political Theory. Constellations 19 (3):353-368.
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  15. Amy Allen (2009). Discourse, Power, and Subjectivation: The Foucault/Habermas Debate Reconsidered. Philosophical Forum 40 (1):1-28.
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  16. Amy R. Allen (2007). Systematically Distorted Subjectivity?: Habermas and the Critique of Power. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (5):641-650.
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  17. Peter Amato (2001). Habermas's “Other” Legitimation Crisis: Critical-Philosophical Dimensions. Radical Philosophy Review 4 (1/2):205-228.
    A kind of political complacency has become a common complaint of Habermasian philosophy. At odds with some earlier stances, according to which he had claimed to represent the best critical hopes of a Marxist tradition that he regarded as exhausted, Habermas has come to defend the legitimacy of liberal democratic institutions and forms ofpolitical expression. No longer the last Marxist, but a hesitant post-Marxist, Habermas is today arguably the foremost intellectual spokesperson for a presently existing democracy which bears as much (...)
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  18. Joel Anderson (2005). Jurgen Habermas, The Future of Human Nature, Translated by Hella Beister, Max Pensky, and William Rehg:The Future of Human Nature. Ethics 115 (4):816-821.
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  19. Samantha Ashenden (2014). On Violence in Habermas's Philosophy of Language. European Journal of Political Theory 13 (4):427-452.
    Habermas does not rule out the possibility of violence in language. In fact his account explicitly licenses a broad conception of violence as ‘systematically distorted communication’. Yet he does rule out the possibility that language simultaneously imposes as it discloses. That is, his argument precludes the possibility of recognizing that there is an antinomy at the heart of language and philosophical reason. This occlusion of the simultaneously world-disclosing and world-imposing character of language feeds and sustains Habermas’s legal and political arguments, (...)
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  20. Samantha Ashenden (1998). Pluralism Within the Limits of Reason Alone? Habermas and the Discursive Negotiation of Consensus. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 1 (3):117-136.
  21. Samantha Ashenden & David Owen (eds.) (1999). Foucault Contra Habermas: Recasting the Dialogue Between Genealogy and Critical Theory. Sage.
    Foucault contra Habermas is an incisive examination of, and a comprehensive introduction to, the debate between Foucault and Habermas over the meaning of enlightenment and modernity. It reprises the key issues in the argument between critical theory and genealogy and is organised around three complementary themes: defining the context of the debate; examining the theoretical and conceptual tools used; and discussing the implications for politics and criticism. In a detailed reply to Habermas' Philosophical Discourse of Modernity, this volume explains the (...)
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  22. Catherine Audard (2011). Rawls and Habermas on the Place of Religion in the Political Domain. In James Gordon Finlayson & Fabian Freyenhagen (eds.), Habermas and Rawls: Disputing the Political. Rouledge.
  23. Jacques Aumètre (1988). Habermas et Althusser : critique de l'idéologie scientiste et critique de l'humanisme idéologique. Philosophiques 15 (1):141-167.
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  24. Randall E. Auxier (1992). Hanks on Habermas and Democratic Communication. Southwest Philosophy Review 8 (2):97-100.
  25. Babette E. Babich (ed.) (2004). Habermas, Nietzsche, and Critical Theory. Humanity Books.
  26. Amy R. Baehr (1996). Toward a New Feminist Liberalism: Okin, Rawls, and Habermas. Hypatia 11 (1):49 - 66.
    While Okin's feminist appropriation of Rawls's theory of justice requires that principles of justice be applied directly to the family, Rawls seems to require only that the family be minimally just. Rawls's recent proposal dulls the critical edge of liberalism by capitulating too much to those holding sexist doctrines. Okin's proposal, however, is insufficiently flexible. An alternative account of the relation of the political and the nonpolitical is offered by Jürgen Habermas.
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  27. Terence Ball (1985). Book Review:Marxism and Totality: The Adventures of a Concept From Lukacs to Habermas. Martin Jay. [REVIEW] Ethics 96 (1):200-.
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  28. Aristides Baltas (1993). Book Review:Moral Consciousness and Communicative Action Jurgen Habermas, Christian Lenhardt, Shierry Weber Nicholsen. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 60 (3):521-.
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  29. Y. Bar-Hillel (1973). On Habermas' Hermeneutic Philosophy of Language. Synthese 26 (1):1 - 12.
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  30. Michael D. Barber (2004). A Moment of Unconditional Validity? Schutz and the Habermas/Rorty Debate. Human Studies 27 (1):51-67.
    Richard Rorty challenges Jurgen Habermas's belief that validity-claims raised within context-bound discussions contain a moment of universality validity. Rorty argues that immersion within contingent languages prohibits any neutral, context-independent ground, that one cannot predict the defense of one's assertions before any audience, and that philosophy can no more escape its contextual limitations than strategic counterparts. Alfred Schutz's phenomenological account of motivation, the reciprocity of perspectives, and the theoretical province of meaning can articulate Habermas's intuitions.Since any claim can be analyzed from (...)
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  31. Ricardo Barbosa (2003). Habermas and the Specificity of the Aesthetic. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 7 (1):87-98.
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  32. Michael W. Barclay (1994). J. Wallulis, The Hermeneutics of Life History: Personal Achievement and History in Gadamer, Habermas, and Erikson. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 1990, 158 Pp., $29.95 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 25 (1):131-135.
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  33. Scott Bartlett (2000). Habermas and Dewey on Democracy. Southwest Philosophy Review 17 (1):145-152.
  34. Bashir Bashir (2012). Reconciling Historical Injustices: Deliberative Democracy and the Politics of Reconciliation. [REVIEW] Res Publica 18 (2):127-143.
    Deliberative democracy is often celebrated and endorsed because of its promise to include, empower, and emancipate otherwise oppressed and excluded social groups through securing their voice and granting them impact in reasoned public deliberation. This article explores the ability of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy to accommodate the demands of historically excluded social groups in democratic plural societies. It argues that the inclusive, transformative, and empowering potential of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy falters when confronted with particular types of historical (...)
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  35. Andrea Baumeister (2011). The Use of “Public Reason” by Religious and Secular Citizens: Limitations of Habermas' Conception of the Role of Religion in the Public Realm. Constellations 18 (2):222-243.
  36. Hugh Baxter (2011). Habermas: The Discourse Theory of Law and Democracy. Stanford Law Books.
    Basic concepts in Habermas's theory of communicative action -- Habermas's "reconstruction" of modern law -- Discourse theory and the theory and practice of adjudication -- System, lifeworld, and Habermas's "communication theory of society" -- After between facts and norms : religion in the public square, multiculturalism, and the "postnational constellation".
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  37. Kenneth Baynes (2004). Habermas's 'Kantian Pragmatism'. In Fred Leland Rush (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Critical Theory. Cambridge University Press. 194--219.
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  38. Kenneth Baynes (2004). The Transcendental Turn: Habermas's “Kantian Pragmatism”. In Fred Leland Rush (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Critical Theory. Cambridge University Press. 194--218.
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  39. Kenneth Baynes (2002). Freedom and Recognition in Hegel and Habermas. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (1):1-17.
    Contrary to some popular interpretations, I argue that Hegel and Habermas share many basic assumptions in their respective accounts of freedom. In particular, both respond to weaknesses in Kant's idea of freedom as acting from (certain kinds of) reasons by explicating this idea with reference to specific social practices or 'forms of recognition' that in turn express suppositions and expectations that actors adopt with respect to one another. I illustrate this common strategy in each and suggest that it may offer (...)
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  40. Ansgar Beckermann (1972). Die realistischen Voraussetzungen der Konsenstheorie von J. Habermas. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 3 (1):63-80.
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  41. Jeffrey K. Beemer (2006). Breaching the Theoretical Divide: Reassessing the Ordinary and Everyday in Habermas and Garfinkel. Sociological Theory 24 (1):81 - 104.
    This article argues that Habermas and Garfinkel present complementary perspectives on the dynamics of ordinary language and the ways in which communication is configured and prefigured in interactive settings. Together they provide a basis for thinking about action and its environments not simply in terms of the in situ or formal conditions in isolation from one another, but as extensions of an integrated dependency between the local (indexical) contexts in which interactions occur and the rational (pretheoretical) presuppositions that make such (...)
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  42. A. Belsey (1995). JM Bernstein. Recovering Ethical Life: Jurgen Habermas and the Future of Critical Theory. Journal of Applied Philosophy 12:301-301.
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  43. Seyla Benhabib (2012). Habermas: An Intellectual Biography by Matthew G. Specter. Constellations 18 (4):589-595.
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  44. J. C. Berendzen (2008). Institutional Design and Public Space: Hegel, Architecture, and Democracy. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (2):291–307.
    Habermas's conception of deliberative democracy could be fruitfully supplemented with a discussion of the "institutional design" of civil society; for example the architecture of public spaces should be considered. This paper argues that Hegel's discussion of architecture in his 'Aesthetics' can speak to this issue. For Hegel, architecture culminates in the gothic cathedral, because of how it fosters reflection on the part of the worshiper. This discussion suggests the possibility that architecture could foster a similar kind of intersubjective reflection. To (...)
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  45. Robert Bernasconi (1991). Habermas and Arendt on the Philosopher's “Error”: Tracking the Diabolical in Heidegger. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 14 (2/1):3-24.
  46. J. M. Bernstein (1995). Recovering Ethical Life: Jürgen Habermas and the Future of Critical Theory. Routledge.
    Jurgen Habermas' construction of a critical social theory of society grounded in communicative reason is one of the very few real philosophical inventions of recent times that demands and repays extended engagement. In this elaborate and sympathetic study which places Habermas' project in the context of critical theory as a whole past and future, J. M. Bernstein argues that despite its undoubted achievements, it contributes to the very problems of ethical dislocation and meaninglessness it aims to diagnose and remedy. Bernstein (...)
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  47. Richard J. Bernstein (2010). Naturalism, Secularism, and Religion: Habermas's Via Media. Constellations 17 (1):155-166.
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  48. Richard J. Bernstein (1988). Fred Dallmayr's Critique of Habermas. Political Theory 16 (4):580-593.
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  49. Richard J. Bernstein (ed.) (1985). Habermas and Modernity. Mit Press.
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  50. André Berten (1989). Habermas, l'éthique et la politique. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 87 (1):74-96.
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