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  1. Zbigniew Bańkowski, John H. Bryant & J. Gallagher (eds.) (1997). Ethics, Equity, and the Renewal of Who's Health-for-All Strategy: Proceedings of the Xxixth Cioms Conference, Geneva, Switzerland 12-14 March 1997. [REVIEW] Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (Cioms).
  2. Françoise Baylis & Carolyn McLeod (2007). The Stem Cell Debate Continues: The Buying and Selling of Eggs for Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):726-731.
    Now that stem cell scientists are clamouring for human eggs for cloning-based stem cell research, there is vigorous debate about the ethics of paying women for their eggs. Generally speaking, some claim that women should be paid a fair wage for their reproductive labour or tissues, while others argue against the further commodification of reproductive labour or tissues and worry about voluntariness among potential egg providers. Siding mainly with those who believe that women should be financially compensated for providing eggs (...)
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  3. Tom L. Beauchamp (2009). Principles of Biomedical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This edition represents a thorough-going revision of what has become a classic text in biomedical ethics. Major structural changes mark the revision. The authors have added a new concluding chapter on methods that, along with its companion chapter on moral theory, emphasizes convergence across theories, coherence in moral justification, and the common morality. They have simplified the opening chapter on moral norms which introduces the framework of prima facie moral principles and ways to specify and balance them. Together with the (...)
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  4. Tom L. Beauchamp (1994). Principles of Biomedical Ethics / Tom L. Beauchamp, James F. Childress. Oxford University Press.
    This is an extremely thorough revision of the leading textbook of bioethics. The authors have made many improvements in style, organization, argument and content. These changes reflect advances in the bioethics literature over the past five years. The most dramatic expansions of the text are in the comprehensiveness with which the authors treat different currents in ethical theory and the greater breadth and depth of their discussion of public policy and public health issues. In every chapter, readers will find new (...)
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  5. D. G. Brown (1972). Drugs and the Problem of Law Abuse. University of British Columbia Law Review 7 (1):1-16.
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  6. Emanuela Ceva (2011). Self-Legislation, Respect and the Reconciliation of Minority Claims. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (1):14-28.
    It is a widely supported claim that liberal democratic institutions should treat citizens with equal respect. I neither dispute nor champion this claim, but investigate how it could be fulfilled. I do this by asking, as a sort of litmus test, how liberal democratic institutions should treat with respect citizens holding minority convictions, and thereby dissenting from a deliberative output. The first step of my argument consists in clarifying the sense in which liberal democracies have a primary concern for the (...)
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  7. Albert R. Jonsen (1985). Organ Transplants and the Principle of Fairness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 13 (1):37-39.
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  8. J. Paul Kelleher (forthcoming). Beneficence, Justice, and Health Care. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal.
    This paper argues that societal duties of health promotion are underwritten (at least in large part) by a principle of beneficence. Further, this principle generates duties of justice that correlate with rights, not merely “imperfect” duties of charity or generosity. To support this argument, I draw on a useful distinction from bioethics and on a somewhat neglected approach to social obligation from political philosophy. The distinction is that between general and specific beneficence; and the approach from political philosophy has at (...)
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  9. Carl Knight (2014). Theories of Distributive Justice and Post-Apartheid South Africa. Politikon 41 (1):23-38.
    South Africa is a highly distributively unequal country, and its inequality continues to be largely along racial lines. Such circumstances call for assessment from the perspective of contemporary theories of distributive justice. Three such theories—Rawlsian justice, utilitarianism, and luck egalitarianism—are described and applied. Rawls' difference principle recommends that the worst off be made as well as they can be, a standard which South Africa clearly falls short of. Utilitarianism recommends the maximization of overall societal well-being, a goal which South Africa (...)
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  10. Kristja´N. Kristja´Nsson (2003). The Development of Justice Conceptions and the Unavoidability of the Normative. Journal of Moral Education 32 (2):183-194.
    This article spells out the way in which normative concerns unavoidably enter into the design and interpretation of empirical research on children's development of justice conceptions, with special emphasis on Damon's well-known stage theory of such development. Normative considerations provide assumptions not only about what counts as a conception of justice in the first place but also what counts as a better or a worse conception. Damon, for one, relies on the questionable normative premise that all distributive choices are choices (...)
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  11. Suzanne Lowell Krogh (1985). Encouraging Positive Justice Reasoning and Perspective‐Taking Skills: Two Educational Interventions. Journal of Moral Education 14 (2):102-110.
    Abstract There has been a need for developmentally appropriate methods of social/moral instruction in the primary grades, particularly methods that would require little teacher preparation or financial investment in materials. This study investigated the efficacy of two such methods: role?play and structured discussion. Subjects were 90 children from Grades One?Three who participated over an eight?week period. Interviews of positive justice reasoning and perspective?taking skills showed significant growth for both role?play and structured discussion subjects when compared to those in a control (...)
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  12. Ignacio Mastroleo (forthcoming). Introducción al problema de la continuidad del tratamiento beneficioso para los sujetos de investigación. In Jorge Alberto Álvarez Díaz (ed.), Ensayos sobre ética de la salud. Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Unidad Xochimilco.
    ¿Qué ocurre con la continuidad del tratamiento de los sujetos de investigación después de que realizan la última visita del ensayo en el que participan? En algunos casos, la falta de continuidad de atención de la salud apropiada podría poner en peligro la salud de estas personas. Por lo tanto, es probable que los sujetos de investigación que al terminar su participación en un ensayo todavía se encuentran enfermos, necesiten continuar con el tratamiento en estudio u otra atención de la (...)
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  13. Laura Purdy (1992). In Their Best Interest? The Case Against Equal Rights for Children. Cornell University Press.
    Proponents of children's liberation (CL) argue that there are no morally relevant differences between children and adults. Consequently, special protective laws that limit children's freedom are unjustified, and should be abolished. Protectionists reject the premise of this argument, and hence also the conclusion. Proponents of CL mostly fix upon the capacity for instrumental reasoning as the criterion that should separate autonomous from non-autonomous individuals. I argue that most children are substantially worse at instrumental reasoning than most adults, and although drawing (...)
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  14. Marcus Schultz-Bergin (2014). Making Better Sense of Animal Disenhancement: A Reply to Henschke. Nanoethics 8 (1):101-109.
    In "Making Sense of Animal Disenhancement" Adam Henschke provides a framework for fully understanding and evaluating animal disenhancement. His conclusion is that animal disenhancement is neither morally nor pragmatically justified. In this paper I argue that Henschke misapplies his own framework for understanding disenhancement, resulting in a stronger conclusion than is justified. In diagnosing his misstep, I argue that the resources he has provided us, combined with my refinements, result in two new avenues for inquiry: an application of concepts from (...)
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  15. Re'em Segev (2013). Making Sense of Discrimination. Ratio Juris (1):47-78.
    Discrimination is a central moral and legal concept. However, it is also a contested one. Particularly, accounts of the wrongness of discrimination often rely on controversial and particular assumptions. In this paper, I argue that a theory of discrimination that relies on premises that are general (rather than unique to the concept of discrimination) and widely accepted provides a plausible (exhaustive) account of the concept of wrongful discrimination. According to the combined theory, wrongful discrimination consists of allocating a benefit that (...)
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  16. Re'em Segev (2007). Lesser Evil and Responsibility: Comments on Jeff McMahan's Analysis of the Morality of War. Israel Law Review 40 (3):709-729.
    The main aim of Jeff McMahan's manuscript on the morality of war is to answer the question: why and accordingly when is it justified or permissible to kill people in war? However, McMahan argues that the same principles apply to individual actions and to war. McMahan rejects all doctrines of collective responsibility and liability. His claim is that every individual is liable for what he has done and not for the actions of others - even if both are part of (...)
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  17. Re'em Segev (2005). Well-Being and Fairness in the Distribution of Scarce Health Resources. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (3):231 – 260.
    Based on a general thesis regarding the proper resolution of interpersonal conflicts, this paper suggests a normative framework for the distribution of scarce health resources. The proposed thesis includes two basic ideas. First, individual well-being is the fundamental value. Second, interpersonal conflicts affecting well-being should be resolved in light of several conceptions of fairness, reflecting the independent value of persons and the moral significance of responsibility of individuals for the existence of interpersonal conflicts. These ideas are elaborated in several principles (...)
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  18. Cristian Timmermann (2013). Life Sciences, Intellectual Property Regimes and Global Justice. Dissertation, Wageningen University
    In this thesis we have examined the complex interaction between intellectual property rights, life sciences and global justice. Science and the innovations developed in its wake have an enormous effect on our daily lives, providing countless opportunities but also raising numerous problems of justice. The complexity of a problem however does not liberate society as a whole from moral responsibilities. Our intellectual property regimes clash at various points with human rights law and commonly held notions of justice.
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  19. Peter Gn West-Oram & Heather Widdows, Global Population and Global Justice: Equitable Distribution of Resources Among Countries. The Electronic Library of Science.
    Analysing the demands of global justice for the distribution of resources is a complex task and requires consideration of a broad range of issues. Of particular relevance is the effect that different distributions will have on global population growth and individual welfare. Since changes in the consumption and distribution of resources can have major effects on the welfare of the global population, and the rate at which it increases, it is important to establish meaningful principles to ensure a just distribution (...)
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  20. Scott Wisor (2011). Against Shallow Ponds: An Argument Against Singer's Approach to Global Poverty. Journal of Global Ethics 7 (1):19 - 32.
    For 40 years, Peter Singer has deployed the case of the child drowning in the shallow pond to argue for greater donations in foreign aid. The persistent use of the shallow pond example in theorizing about global poverty ignores morally salient features of the real world, and ignoring such morally salient features can have a variety of harmful implications for anti-poverty work. I argue that the shallow pond example should be abandoned, and defend this claim against possible objections.
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