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  1. Ian Adams (1990). Kant, Pestalozzi and the Role of Ideology in Educational Thought. Journal of Philosophy of Education 24 (2):257–269.
  2. Henry E. Allison (2001). Ethics, Evil, and Anthropology in Kant: Remarks on Allen Wood's "Kant's Ethical Thought". [REVIEW] Ethics 111 (3):594-613.
  3. Henry E. Allison (2001). Ethics, Evil, and Anthropology in Kant: Remarks on Allen Wood's. Ethics 111 (3):594-613.
  4. Karl Alphéus (1968). Was Ist der Mensch? (Nach Kant Und Heidegger). Kant-Studien 59 (1-4):187-198.
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  5. Matthew C. Altman (2010). Kant on Sex and Marriage: The Implications for the Same-Sex Marriage Debate. Kant-Studien 101 (3):309-330.
    When examined critically, Kant's views on sex and marriage give us the tools to defend same-sex marriage on moral grounds. The sexual objectification of one's partner can only be overcome when two people take responsibility for one another's overall well-being, and this commitment is enforced through legal coercion. Kant's views on the unnaturalness of homosexuality do not stand up to scrutiny, and he cannot (as he often tries to) restrict the purpose of sex to procreation. Kant himself rules out marriage (...)
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  6. Karl Ameriks (1999). Review: Vorlesungen Über Anthropologie. Vol. XXV (Division 4, Vorlesungen, Vol. 2) of Kants Gesammelte Schriften. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (2):370-372.
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  7. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2010). Kant, Radical Evil, and Crimes Against Humanity. In Sharon Anderson-Gold & Pablo Muchnik (eds.), Kant's Anatomy of Evil. Cambridge University Press.
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  8. Sharon Anderson-Gold (1994). Kant's Ethical Anthropology and the Critical Foundations of the Philosophy of History. History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (4):405 - 419.
  9. Meg Armstrong (1996). "The Effects of Blackness": Gender, Race, and the Sublime in Aesthetic Theories of Burke and Kant. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (3):213-236.
  10. Camille Atkinson (2007). Kant on Human Nature and Radical Evil. Philosophy and Theology 19 (1/2):215-224.
    Are human beings essentially good or evil? Immanuel Kant responds, “[H]e [man] is as much the one as the other, partly good, partly bad.” Given this, I’d like to explore the following: What does Kant mean by human nature and how is it possible to be both good and evil? What is “original sin” and does it place limits on free will? In what respect might Kant’s views be significant for non-believers? More specifically, is Kant saying that human beings need (...)
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  11. Dennis Vanden Auweele (2010). Atheism, Radical Evil, and Kant. Philosophy and Theology 22 (1/2):155-176.
    This paper investigates the link between (radical) evil and the existence of God. Arguing with contemporary atheist thinkers, such as Richard Dawkins and Victor Stenger, I hold that one can take the existence of evil as a sign of the existence of God rather than its opposite. The work of Immanuel Kant, especially his thought on evil, is a fertile source to enliven this intuition. Kant implicitly seems to argue that because man is unable to overcome evil by himself, there (...)
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  12. Sidney Axinn (1981). Ambivalence: Kant's View of Human Nature. Kant-Studien 72 (1-4):169-174.
  13. Lewis White Beck (1988). The Extraterrestrial Life Debate. 1750-1900. The Idea of a Plurality of Worlds From Kant to Lowell. Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (2):324-326.
  14. Jeffrey Bernstein (1997). Imagination and Lunacy in Kant's First Critique and Anthropology. Idealistic Studies 27 (3):143-154.
  15. Heiner Bielefeldt (2006). Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):229-232.
  16. Reinhard Brandt (2000). Anthropologie in pragmatischer Hinsicht. Kant-Studien 91 (s1):76-77.
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  17. Daniel Breazeale (2001). Fichte's Conception of Philosophy as a "Pragmatic History of the Human Mind" and the Contributions of Kant, Platner, and Maimon. Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (4):685-703.
  18. N. Brender (2001). Kant's Conception of Moral Character: The "Critical" Link of Morality, Anthropology, and Reflective Judgment. Philosophical Review 110 (3):440-443.
  19. Matthew Caswell (2006). The Value of Humanity and Kant's Conception of Evil. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):635-663.
    Matthew Caswell - The Value of Humanity and Kant's Conception of Evil - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:4 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.4 635-663 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents The Value of Humanity and Kant's Conception of Evil Matthew Caswell Recent years have seen the development of a powerful reinterpretation of Kant's basic approach in ethical thought. Kant, it is argued, should not be read as defending the stark, metaphysics-laden formalism for which his theory is (...)
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  20. Andrew Chignell (2012). Review: Lehner, Kants Vorsehungskonzept Auf Dem Hintergrund der Deutschen Schulphilosophie Und -Theologie. [REVIEW] Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):143-147.
  21. Robert R. Clewis (2007). Review: Frierson, Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 12 (2):196-199.
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  22. Robert R. Clewis (2007). Review: Frierson, Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 12 (2):196-199.
  23. Alix Cohen (2008). Kant on Anthropology and Alienology: The Opacity of Human Motivation and its Anthropological Implications. Kantian Review 13 (2):85-106.
    According to Kant, the opacity of human motivation takes two distinct forms – a psychological form: man ‘can never, even by the most strenuous self-examination, get entirely behind [his] covert incentives’ – and a social form: ‘everyone in our race finds it advisable to be on his guard, and not to reveal himself completely’. In other words, first, men's ‘interior’ cannot be entirely revealed to themselves and, second, they tend not to reveal their ‘interior’ to others. A number of Kant (...)
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  24. Alix A. Cohen (2009). Kant's Concept of Freedom and the Human Sciences. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (1):pp. 113-135.
  25. Alix A. Cohen (2008). Kant's Answer to the Question 'What is Man?' And its Implications for Anthropology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):506-514.
    This paper examines Kant’s anthropological project and its relationship to his conception of ‘man’ in order to show that Kant’s answer to the question ‘what is man?’ entails a decisive re-evaluation of traditional conceptions of human nature. I argue that Kant redirects the question ‘what is man?’ away from defining man in terms of what he is, and towards defining him in terms of what he does, in particular through the distinction between three levels of what I will call ‘man’s (...)
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  26. Michèle Cohen-Halimi (1994). L'anthropologia in nuce de Kant et Hamann. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 99 (3):313 - 325.
    Un fait divers, l'apparition en 1764 d'un homme prétendument sauvage dans les forêts de Königsberg, fournit à Kant et Hamann l'occasion d'une confrontation de leurs points de vue sur l'intelligibilité de la naturalité et de la f actualité humaines. Parue dans la Gazette politique et littéraire de Königsberg sous la forme de deux articles (que nous traduisons), cette confrontation dépasse vite l'anecdote pour conduire à la divergence de deux voies, celle implicite de Hamann, l'interprétation théologique, et celle encore « en (...)
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  27. Timothy M. Costelloe (2001). Review: Munzel, Kant's Conception of Moral Character: The "Critical" Link of Morality, Anthropology, and Reflective Judgment. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (3):445-446.
  28. Jeffrey Edwards (2000). Self-Love, Anthropology, and Universal Benevolence in Kant's Metaphysics of Morals. Review of Metaphysics 53 (4):887 - 914.
  29. Paul Formosa (2011). A Life Without Affects and Passions: Kant on the Duty of Apathy. Parrhesia 13:96-111.
  30. Williams Forrest (1955). Philosophical Anthropology and the Critique of Aesthetic Judgment. Kant-Studien 46 (1-4):172-188.
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  31. Patrick Frierson (2010). Two Standpoints and the Problem of Moral Anthropology. In James Krueger & Benjamin Bruxvoort Lipscomb (eds.), Kant's Moral Metaphysics. Walter Degruyter. 83.
  32. Patrick Frierson (2005). The Moral Importance of Politeness in Kant's Anthropology. Kantian Review 9 (1):105-127.
    In his Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals , Kant explains that ethics, like physics, ‘will have its empirical part, but it will also have a rational part, … though here [in ethics] the empirical part might be given the special name practical anthropology’ . In the Groundwork, Kant suggests that anthropology, or the ‘power of judgment sharpened by experience’, has two roles, ‘to distinguish in what cases [moral laws] are applicable’ and ‘to gain for [moral laws] access to the (...)
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  33. Patrick Frierson, Anthropologie in Pragmatischer Hinsicht.
    In 1773, Kant cancelled a course in theoretical physics – due to lack of enrollment – and taught “Anthropology” in its place. From that time, Kant taught Anthropology every winter semester until he retired in 1796. The anthropology course was one of two courses in “Weltkenntnis” that Kant taught every year. The other, physical geography, was taught in the Summer semester. When he retired, Kant compiled the notes from his anthropology lecture course into Anthropologie in pragmatischer Hinsicht, the last publication (...)
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  34. Patrick R. Frierson (2006). Character and Evil in Kant's Moral Anthropology. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):623-634.
    In the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant explains that moral anthropology studies the “subjective conditions in human nature that help or hinder [people] in fulfilling the laws of a metaphysics of morals” and insists that such anthropology “cannot be dispensed with” (6:217).1 But it is often difficult to find clear evidence of this sort of anthropology in Kant’s own works. in this paper, i discuss Kant’s account of character as an example of Kantian moral anthropology.
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  35. Patrick R. Frierson (2005). Kant's Empirical Account of Human Action. Philosophers' Imprint 5 (7):1-34.
    In the first Critique, Kant says, “[A]ll the actions of a human being are determined in accord with the order of nature,” adding that “if we could investigate all the appearances . . . there would be no human action we could not predict with certainty.” Most Kantian treatments of human action discuss action from a practical perspective, according to which human beings are transcendentally free, and thus do not sufficiently lay out this Kant’s empirical, causal description of human action. (...)
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  36. Patrick R. Frierson (2003). Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first comprehensive account of Kant's theory of freedom and his moral anthropology. The point of departure is the apparent conflict between three claims to which Kant is committed: that human beings are transcendentally free, that moral anthropology studies the empirical influences on human beings, and that more anthropology is morally relevant. Frierson shows why this conflict is only apparent. He draws on Kant's transcendental idealism and his theory of the will and describes how empirical influences can (...)
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  37. Ernesto V. Garcia (2006). Review: Essays on Kant's Anthropology. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):240-244.
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  38. Volker Gerhardt, Rolf-Peter Horstmann & Ralph Schumacher (eds.) (2001). Kant Und Die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des IX Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Walter de Gruyter.
    Theoretical Laws and Normative Rules: Kant and Bolzano's Views on Logic'"1" Anita Von Duhn, Genf Does logic instruct us how to think correctly? ...
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  39. Brian Gregor (2009). Review: Kant, Translated and Edited by Louden, Anthropology From a Pragmatic Point of View. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 50 (2):337-337.
  40. Jeanine Grenberg (1999). Review: Munzel, Kant's Conception of Moral Character: The Critical Link of Morality, Anthropology and Reflective Judgment. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 3 (1):146-148.
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  41. Jeanine Grenberg (1999). Anthropology From a Metaphysical Point of View. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (1):91-115.
    I argue that there can be, on Kant's account, a significant motivational role for feeling in moral action. I first discuss and reject Andrews Reath's claim that Kant is forced to disallow a motivational role for feeling because of his rejection of moral sense theory. I then consider and reject the more general challenge that allowing a role for the influence of feeling on the faculty of desire undermines Kant's commitment to a morality free from anthropological considerations. I conclude by (...)
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  42. Robert Gressis (2010). Review: Sharon Anderson-Gold & Pablo Muchnik, Kant's Anatomy of Evil. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).
    In this book review, I assess the merits of the book as a whole (it's good!) while focusing in particular on chapters by Claudia Card, Patrick Frierson, Robert Louden, Pablo Muchnik, Jeanine Grenberg, and Allen Wood.
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  43. Stephen R. Grimm (2002). Kant's Argument for Radical Evil. European Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):160–177.
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  44. Paul Guyer (1995). Moral Anthropology in Kant's Aesthetics and Ethics: A Reply to Ameriks and Sherman. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (2):379-391.
  45. Béatrice Han-Pile (2009). Review: Foucault, Introduction À l'Anthropologie (Published in One Volume with Foucault's Translation of Emmanuel Kant's Anthropologie d'Un Point De Vue Pragmatique). [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
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  46. Robert Hanna (2011). Kant and the Human Sciences: Biology, Anthropology, and History. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (5):777 - 781.
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Volume 19, Issue 5, Page 777-781, December 2011.
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  47. Todd Hedrick (2008). Race, Difference, and Anthropology in Kant's Cosmopolitanism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 245-268.
    This paper explores the connections between Kant’s theory of hierarchical racial difference, on the one hand, and his cosmopolitanism and conceptions of moral and political progress, on the other. I argue that Kant’s racial biology plays an essential role in maintaining national-cultural differences, which he views as essential for the establishment of the cosmopolitan union. Unfortunately, not only are these views racist, they also complicate Kant’s ability to consistently think through the prospect of the human species’ moral progress. Thus, while (...)
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  48. James Humphries (forthcoming). Patrick R. Frierson, Kant's Questions: What is the Human Being? [REVIEW] Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies.
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  49. Brian Jacobs & Patrick Kain (eds.) (2003). Essays on Kant's Anthropology. Cambridge University Press.
    Kant's lectures on anthropology capture him at the height of his intellectual power. They are immensely important for advancing our understanding of Kant's conception of anthropology, its development, and the notoriously difficult relationship between it and the critical philosophy. This collection of new essays by some of the leading commentators on Kant offers the first systematic account of the philosophical importance of this material that should nevertheless prove of interest to historians of ideas and political theorists. There are two broad (...)
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  50. Patrick Kain (2011). Der Charackter der Gattung. In Otfried Höffe (ed.), Immanuel Kant: Schriften zur Geschichtsphilosophie. Akademie Verlag.
    In the concluding section of his *Anthropology* textbook, Kant offers the outlines of a portrait of the human race and of its collective character and vocation. The section is of interest for students of Kant’s Geschichtsphilosophie because of what it reveals about Kant’s conception of human progress, and the processes responsible for it. On Kant’s view, we can only expect collective progress through incremental political reform, and our expectation of progress rests significantly upon our own, specifically moral, reflections upon human (...)
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