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  1. Henry E. Allison (1997). Beauty and Duty in Kant's Critique of Judgement. Kantian Review 1:53-81.
  2. Karl Ameriks (1994). Book Review:Kant and the Experience of Freedom: Essays on Aesthetics and Morality. Paul Guyer. [REVIEW] Ethics 105 (1):207-.
  3. Karl Ameriks (1980). Kant and the Claims of Taste. [REVIEW] New Scholasticism 54 (2):241-249.
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  4. Dorit Barchana-Lorand (2002). The Kantian Beautiful, or, the Utterly Useless: Prolegomena to Any Future Aesthetics. Kant-Studien 93 (3):309–323.
  5. David Berger (2009). Kant's Aesthetic Theory: The Beautiful and Agreeable. Continuum.
    The twofold conception of taste -- The beautiful and the agreeable -- Sensations and interests -- Some varieties of normativity.
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  6. J. M. Bernstein (2000). Judging Life: From Beauty to Experience. From Kant to Chaim Soutine. Constellations 7 (2):157-177.
  7. Bernard Bourgeois (1993). The Beautiful and the Good According to Kant (Translated by Charles Wolfe). Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 16 (2):359-373.
  8. Malcolm Budd (1998). Delight in the Natural World: Kant on the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature. Part I: Natural Beauty. British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (1):1-18.
  9. Malcolm Budd (1998). Delight in the Natural World: Kant on the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature. Part II: Natural Beauty and Morality. British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (2):117-126.
  10. Joseph Cannon (2011). The Moral Value of Artistic Beauty in Kant. Kantian Review 16 (1):113-126.
    In the third Critique, Kant argues that it is to take an immediate interest in natural beauty, because it indicates an interest in harmony between nature and moral freedom. He, however, denies that there can be a similarly significant interest in artistic beauty. I argue that Kant ought not to deny this value to artistic beauty because his account of fine art as the joint product of the of genius and the discipline of taste commits him to the claim that (...)
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  11. E. F. Carritt (1925). The Sources and Effects in England of Kant's Philosophy of Beauty. The Monist 35 (2):315-328.
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  12. Andrew Chignell (2013). Ogilby, Milton, Canary Wine, and the Red Scorpion: Another Look at Kant's Deduction of Taste. In Dina Emundts (ed.), Self, World, and Art. Walter De Gruyter. 261-282.
    An effort to expand and defend aspects of my earlier reading of the Deduction of Taste. The Red Scorpion is just for fun. -/- .
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  13. Andrew Chignell (2006). Beauty as a Symbol of Natural Systematicity. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (4):406-415.
    I examine Kant's claim that a relation of symbolization links judgments of beauty and judgments of ‘systematicity’ in nature (that is, judgments concerning the ordering of natural forms under hierarchies of laws). My aim is to show that the symbolic relation between the two is, for Kant, much closer than many commentators think: it is not only the form but also the objects of some of our judgments of taste that symbolize the systematicity of nature. -/- .
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  14. Ted Cohen (2002). Three Problems in Kant's Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (1):1-12.
    What does the faculty of Understanding do during the execution of a judgement of taste? How are singular judgements of beauty related to general judgements of beauty? For what reason is beauty the symbol of morality? The first question has a tentative answer, although one not obviously congenial to Kant. The second two questions have no compelling answers.
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  15. Diarmuid Costello (2007). Greenberg's Kant and the Fate of Aesthetics in Contemporary Art Theory. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (2):217–228.
  16. Paul Crowther (1985). Fundamental Ontology and Transcendent Beauty: An Approach to Kant's Aesthetics. Kant-Studien 76 (1-4):55-71.
  17. George Dickie (1989). Kant, Mothersill and Principles of Taste. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (4):375-376.
  18. Denis Dutton, The Experience of Art is Paradise Regained: Kant on Free and Dependent Beauty.
    In the Critique of Judgment , Kant presents what is possibly the most powerful aesthetic theory ever devised. It is not the clearest, and even when it comes clear, it is only after much toil. But its contradictions and complexities — apparent or real — reflect and disclose to great depth the very complexities and paradoxes that infect our artistic and aesthetic lives. Later aestheticians have with greater sophistication directed attention to the social and historical aspects of institutionalised fine (...)
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  19. Denis Dutton (1994). Kant and the Conditions of Artistic Beauty. British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (3):226-239.
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  20. Corey W. Dyck (2009). Review: Guyer, Knowledge, Reason, and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):613-619.
  21. Mihaela C. Fistioc (2002). The Beautiful Shape of the Good: Platonic and Pythagorean Themes in Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment. Routledge.
    This book investigates the link Kant discerned between our experience of beauty and our experience of the moral law. By examining Kant's relation to Greek philosophy, to Plato and Pythagoras, as found in Kant's own writings, the author sheds new light on one the most intriguing and mysterious doctrines of Kant's third Critique.
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  22. Werner Flach (1979). Objectivity and Existential Meaning of the Beautiful. Investigations of Kant's 'Critique of Aesthetic Judgment'. Philosophy and History 12 (1):37-38.
  23. Martin Gammon (1999). Parerga and Pulchritudo Adhaerens: A Reading of the Third Moment of the “Analytic of the Beautiful”. Kant-Studien 90 (2):148-167.
  24. Hannah Ginsborg (2003). Aesthetic Judging and the Intentionality of Pleasure. Inquiry 46 (2):164 – 181.
    I point out some unclarities in Allison's interpretation of Kant's aesthetic theory, specifically in his account of the free play of the faculties. I argue that there is a tension between Allison's commitment to the intentionality of the pleasure involved in a judgment of beauty, and his view that the pleasure is distinct from the judgment, and I claim that the tension should be resolved by rejecting the latter view. I conclude by addressing Allison's objection that my own view fails (...)
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  25. P. Giordanetti (1998). Recensione: Tomasi, Il salvataggio kantiano della bellezza. Kant-Studien 89:99-100.
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  26. Keren Gorodeisky (2010). A New Look at Kant's View of Aesthetic Testimony. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):53-70.
    In this paper I explore the following threefold question: first, is there a genuine problem of grounding aesthetic judgement in testimony? Second, if there is such a problem, what exactly is its nature? And lastly, can Kant help us get clearer on the problem? Following Kant, I argue that the problem with aesthetic testimony is explained by norms that govern what it takes to judge a beautiful object aesthetically, rather than theoretically or practically, not by norms that govern what it (...)
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  27. K. Gorodeisky (2011). A Tale of Two Faculties. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (4):415-436.
    The notion of the ‘free harmony of the faculties’ has baffled many of Kant's readers and also attracted much criticism. In this paper I attempt to shed light on this puzzling notion. By doing so, I aim to challenge some of the criticisms that this notion has attracted, and to point to its relevance to contemporary debates in aesthetics. While most of the literature on the free harmony is characterized by what I regard as an ‘extra-aesthetic approach’, I propose ‘an (...)
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  28. K. Gorodeisky (2010). Kant's Aesthetic Theory: The Beautiful and Agreeable. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (3):317-320.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  29. Paul Guyer (2009). The Harmony of the Faculties in Recent Books on the Critique of the Power of Judgment. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):201-221.
  30. Paul Guyer, 18th Century German Aesthetics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  31. Paul Guyer (2007). Free Play and True Well-Being: Herder's Critique of Kant's Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (4):353–368.
  32. Paul Guyer (2006). The Harmony of the Faculties Revisited. In Rebecca Kukla (ed.), Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
  33. Paul Guyer (2003). Beauty, Systematicity, and the Highest Good: Eckart Förster's Kant's Final Synthesis. Inquiry 46 (2):195 – 214.
    Contrary to Eckart Förster, I argue that the Opus postumum represents more of an evolution than a revolution in Kant's thought. Among other points, I argue that Kant's Selbstsetzungslehre, or theory of self-positing, according to which we cannot have knowledge of the spatio-temporal world except through recognition of the changes we initiate in it by our own bodies, does not constitute a radicalization of Kant's transcendental idealism, but is a development of the realist line of argument introduced by the "Refutation (...)
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  34. Paul Guyer (2002). Free and Adherent Beauty: A Modest Proposal. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (4):357-366.
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  35. Paul Guyer (1999). Dependent Beauty Revisited: A Reply to Wicks. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (3):357-361.
  36. Paul Guyer (1997). Kant and the Claims of Taste. Cambridge University Press.
    Kant and the Claims of Taste, published here for the first time in paperback in a revised version, has become, since its initial publication in 1979, the standard commentary on Kant's aesthetic theory. The book offers a detailed account of Kant's views on judgments of taste, aesthetic pleasure, imagination and many other topics. For this new edition, Paul Guyer has provided a new foreword and has added a chapter on Kant's conception of fine art. This re-issue will complement the author's (...)
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  37. Paul Guyer (1995). Beauty, Sublimity, and Expression: Reply to Wicks and Cantrick. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (2):194-195.
  38. Paul Guyer (1993). Kant and the Experience of Freedom: Essays on Aesthetics and Morality. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays by one of the preeminent Kant scholars of our time transforms our understanding of both Kant's aesthetics and his ethics. Guyer shows that at the very core of Kant's aesthetic theory, disinterestedness of taste becomes an experience of freedom and thus an essential accompaniment to morality itself. At the same time he reveals how Kant's moral theory includes a distinctive place for the cultivation of both general moral sentiments and particular attachments on the basis of the (...)
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  39. Paul Guyer (1986). Mary Mothersill's Beauty Restored. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 44 (3):245-255.
  40. Paul Guyer (1978). Disinterestedness and Desire in Kant's Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 36 (4):449-460.
  41. Arata Hamawaki (2006). Kant on Beauty and the Normative Force of Feeling. Philosophical Topics 34 (1/2):107-144.
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  42. Andy Hamilton (2010). Review: Guyer, Knowledge, Reason and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):737-739.
  43. R. Kevin Hill (2007). Nietzsche's Debt to Kant's Theory of the Beautiful in Birth of Tragedy. International Studies in Philosophy 39 (3):85-97.
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  44. Dilek Huseyinzadegan (2008). Kant on Beauty and Biology: An Interpretation of the Critique of Judgment. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 29 (1):281-285.
  45. Mark L. Johnson (1979). Kant's Unified Theory of Beauty. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 38 (2):167-178.
  46. Jean Kahn (2009). A Propos d'Une Correction à Apporter du Texte d'Une Définition du Beau Dans la Critique de la Faculté de Juger. Kant-Studien 100 (1):106-106.
  47. Jade Kaminsky (1959). Kant's Analysis of Aesthetics. Kant-Studien 50 (1-4):77-88.
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  48. Immanuel Kant (2007). Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime (1764). In , Anthropology, History, and Education. Cambridge University Press.
  49. Immanuel Kant (1960). Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime. Berkeley, University of California Press.
    Kant's only aesthetic work apart from the Critique of Judgment , Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime gives the reader a sense of the personality and character of its author as he sifts through the range of human responses to the concept of beauty and human manifestations of the beautiful and sublime. Kant was fifty-eight when the first of his great Critical trilogy, the Critique of Pure Reason , was published. Observations offers a view into the mind (...)
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  50. Salim Kemal (1980). The Importance of Artistic Beauty. Kant-Studien 71 (1-4):488-507.
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