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  1. Erich Adickes (1897). Die bewegenden Kräfte in Kants philosophischer Entwicklung und die beiden Pole seines Systems. Zweiter Artikel. Kant-Studien 1 (1-3):161-196.
  2. Henry E. Allison (2008). "Whatever Begins to Exist Must Have a Cause of Existence": Hume's Analysis and Kant's Response. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):525–546.
  3. Henry E. Allison (1996). Review of Kant's Compatibilism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 105 (1).
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  4. Henry E. Allison (1993). Kant on Freedom: A Reply to My Critics. Inquiry 36 (4):443 – 464.
    The first two sections of this paper are devoted respectively to the criticisms of my views raised by Stephen Engstrom and Andrews Reath at a symposium on Kant's Theory of Freedom held in Washington D.C. on 28 December 1992 under the auspices of the North American Kant Society. The third section contains my response to the remarks of Marcia Baron at a second symposium in Chicago on 24 April 1993 at the APA Western Division meetings. The fourth section deals with (...)
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  5. Henry E. Allison (1990). Kant's Theory of Freedom. Cambridge University Press.
    In his new book the eminent Kant scholar Henry Allison provides an innovative and comprehensive interpretation of Kant's concept of freedom. The author analyzes the concept and discusses the role it plays in Kant's moral philosophy and psychology. He also considers in full detail the critical literature on the subject from Kant's own time to the present day. In the first part Professor Allison argues that at the center of the Critique of Pure Reason there is the foundation for a (...)
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  6. J. Aul (1986). ST Sur le concept de causalité chez Kant. Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 78 (1):34-54.
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  7. Kent Baldner (1988). Causality and Things in Themselves. Synthese 77 (3):353 - 373.
    In this paper I examine Kant''s use of causal language to characterize things in themselves. Following Nicholas Rescher, I contend that Kant''s use of such causal language can only be understood by first coming to grips with the relation of things in themselves to appearances. Unlike Rescher, however, I argue that things in themselves and appearances are not numerically distinct entities. Rather, I claim that it is things in themselves that we are intentionally related to in veridical experience, though of (...)
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  8. Gary Banham, Dynamics and the Reality of Force in Leibniz and Kant.
  9. Gary Banham, Kant and Leibniz on Living Force.
    Paper published on author's website available at http://www.garybanham.net/PAPERS_files/Kant%20and%20Leibniz%20on%20Living%20Force.pdf.
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  10. Gary Banham (2008). Kant, Hume and Causation. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (4):801 – 810.
    Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published following peer-review in British Journal for the History of Philosophy, published by and copyright Routledge.
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  11. Adrian Bardon (2002). Temporal Passage and Kant's Second Analogy. Ratio 15 (2):134–153.
  12. Steven M. Bayne (2004). Kant on Causation: On the Fivefold Routes to the Principle of Causation. State University of New York Press.
    A volume in the SUNY series in Philosophy George R. Lucas Jr., editor.
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  13. Lewis White Beck (1981). Kant on the Uniformity of Nature. Synthese 47 (3):449 - 464.
  14. Lewis White Beck (1976). Is There a Non Sequitur in Kant's Proof of the Causal Principle? Kant-Studien 67 (1-4):385-389.
  15. Lewis White Beck (1966). The Second Analogy and the Principle of Indeterminacy. Kant-Studien 57 (1-4):199-205.
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  16. Nathan Brett (1983). Hume's Debt to Kant. Hume Studies 9 (1):59-73.
  17. Gerd Buchdahl (1965). Causality, Causal Laws and Scientific Theory in the Philosophy of Kant. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 16 (63):187-208.
  18. Quassim Cassam (2008). Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality, by Eric Watkins. European Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):330-332.
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  19. Gary L. Cesarz (2007). Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):166-167.
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  20. Brian Chance (2013). Causal Powers, Hume's Early German Critics, and Kant's Response to Hume. Kant-Studien 104 (2):213-236.
    Eric Watkins has argued on philosophical, textual, and historical grounds that Kant’s account of causation in the first Critique should not be read as an attempt to refute Hume’s account of causation. In this paper, I challenge the arguments for Watkins’ claim. Specifically, I argue (1) that Kant’s philosophical commitments, even on Watkins’ reading, are not obvious obstacles to refuting Hume, (2) that textual evidence from the “Disciple of Pure Reason” suggests Kant conceived of his account of causation as such (...)
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  21. Andrew Chignell (2014). Can Kantian Laws Be Broken? Res Philosophica 91 (1):103-121.
    In this paper I explore Kant’s critical discussions of the topic of miracles (including the important but neglected fragment from the 1780s called “On Miracles”) in an effort to answer the question in the title. Along the way I discuss some of the different kinds of “laws” in Kant’s system, and also the argument for his claim that, even if empirical miracles do occur, we will never be in a good position to identify instances of them. I conclude with some (...)
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  22. Andrew Chignell & Derk Pereboom (2010). Kant's Theory of Causation and its Eighteenth-Century German Background. Philosophical Review 119 (4):565-591.
    This critical notice highlights the important contributions that Eric Watkins's writings have made to our understanding of theories about causation developed in eighteenth-century German philosophy and by Kant in particular. Watkins provides a convincing argument that central to Kant's theory of causation is the notion of a real ground or causal power that is non-Humean (since it doesn't reduce to regularities or counterfactual dependencies among events or states) and non-Leibnizean because it doesn't reduce to logical or conceptual relations. However, we (...)
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  23. Jeffery R. Dodge (1982). Uniformity of Empirical Cause-Effect Relations in the Second Analogy. Kant-Studien 73 (1-4):47-54.
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  24. Corey W. Dyck (2009). Review: Guyer, Knowledge, Reason, and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):613-619.
  25. Costantino Esposito (2004). Kausalität als Freiheit: Heidegger liest Kant. Heidegger Studies 20:101-125.
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  26. A. C. Ewing (1924/1969). Kant's Treatment of Causality. [Hamden, Conn.]Archon Books.
    First published in 1924, this book examines one of the main philosophical debates of the period. Focusing on Kant’s proof of causality, A.C. Ewing promotes its validity not only for the physical but also for the "psychological" sphere. The subject is of importance, for the problem of causality for Kant constituted the crucial test of his philosophy, the most significant of the Kantian categories. The author believes that Kant’s statement of his proof, while too much bound up with other parts (...)
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  27. Andrea Faggion (2012). The Second Analogy and the Kantian Answer to Hume: Why “Cause” has to Be an a Priori Concept. Revista de Filosofia Aurora 24 (350):61.
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  28. Hector Ferreiro (2012). A Superação Hegeliana Do Dualismo Entre Determinismo E Liberdade. In Konrad Utz, Agemir Bavaresco & Paulo R. Konzen (eds.), Sujeito e Liberdade: Investigações a Partir do Idealismo Alemão. ediPUCRS. 129-143.
    Kant explicitou, talvez com maior clareza que qualquer outro filósofo antes do que ele, a essência do conflito que implica a relação da causalidade natural e a causalidade livre. Hegel assevera que com o dualismo fenômeno-coisa em si Kant deixa intacta como tal a incompatibilidade entre as noções de causalidade natural e causalidade livre, já que, conserva sua contraposição mesma para simplesmente localizá-la na estrutura do sujeito. Hegel aspira precisamente a fechar o ciclo da metafísica dualista que definiu a filosofia (...)
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  29. Maurice A. Finocchiaro (1984). Hume, Kant E L'Induzione. Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (4):484-485.
  30. Robert J. Fogelin (1976). Kant and Hume on Simultaneity of Causes and Effects. Kant-Studien 67 (1-4):51-59.
  31. Amihud Gilead (1990). Spinoza's Two Causal Chains. Kant-Studien 81 (4):454-475.
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  32. T. Greenwood (1981). A Non Sequitur of Numbing Grossness. Kant-Studien 72 (1-4):11-30.
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  33. Paul Guyer (2003). Kant's Answer to Hume? Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):127-164.
  34. Andree Hahmann (2008). Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality - by Eric Watkins. Philosophical Books 49 (1):52-54.
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  35. Bryan Hall (2007). Review: Watkins, Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 12 (2):158-160.
  36. Bryan Hall (2007). Review: Watkins, Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 12 (2):158-160.
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  37. Bryan Hall (2006). Review: Westphal, Kant's Transcendental Proof of Realism. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 11 (1):127-130.
  38. Andy Hamilton (2010). Review: Guyer, Knowledge, Reason and Taste: Kant's Response to Hume. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):737-739.
  39. Robert Hanna (2009). Freedom, Teleology, and Rational Causation. Kant Yearbook 1 (1).
  40. Robert Hanna (2006). Kant, Causation, and Freedom. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (2):281-305.
  41. William Harper (1981). Kant's Empirical Realism and the Second Analogy of Experience. Synthese 47 (3):465 - 480.
  42. Boris Hennig (forthcoming). Kants Modell Kausaler Verhältnisse. Kant Studien.
    Eric Watkins argues that according to Kant, causation is not a relation between two events, but a relation between the “causality” of a substance and an event. It is shown that his arguments are partly based on a confusion between causation and interaction. Further, Watkins claims that for Kant, causes cannot be temporally determined. If this were true, it would follow that there can be no causal chains, and that all factors that determine the time when an effect occurs do (...)
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  43. Karl Hepfer & Die Form der Erkenntnis (2013). Berichte und Diskussionen. Kant-Studien 104 (2).
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  44. W. Michael Hoffman (1975). An Interpretation of Kant's Causal Determinism. Idealistic Studies 5 (2):139-163.
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  45. Desmond Hogan (2009). Noumenal Affection. Philosophical Review 118 (4):501 - 532.
    A central doctrine of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason holds that the content of human experience is rooted in an affection of sensibility by unknowable things in themselves. This famous and puzzling affection doctrine raises two seemingly intractable old problems, which can be termed the Indispensability and the Consistency Problems. By what right does Kant present affection by supersensible entities as an indispensable requirement of experience? And how could any argument for such indispensability avoid violating the Critique's doctrine of noumenal (...)
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  46. Hansgeorg Hoppe (1971). Kants antwort auf Hume. Kant-Studien 62 (1-4):335-350.
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  47. J. Hutchison Stirling (1884). Kant has Not Answered Hume. Mind (36):531-547.
  48. Christopher Janaway (2012). Necessity, Responsibility and Character: Schopenhauer on Freedom of the Will. Kantian Review 17 (3):431-457.
    This paper gives an account of the argument of Schopenhauer's essay On the Freedom of the Human Will, drawing also on his other works. Schopenhauer argues that all human actions are causally necessitated, as are all other events in empirical nature, hence there is no freedom in the sense of liberum arbitrium indifferentiae. However, our sense of responsibility or agency (being the ) is nonetheless unshakeable. To account for this Schopenhauer invokes the Kantian distinction between empirical and intelligible characters. The (...)
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  49. Béla Juhos (1934). Praktische und physikalische kausalität. Kant-Studien 39 (1-3):188-204.
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  50. Klaus Erich Kaehler (1985). Kants frühe Kritik an der Lehre von der „prästabilierten Harmonie” und ihr Verhältnis zu Leibniz. Kant-Studien 76 (1-4):405-419.
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