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  1. Lucy Allais (2009). Kant, Non-Conceptual Content and the Representation of Space. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 383-413.
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  2. R. E. Aquila (2002). Robert Greenberg, Kant's Theory of A Priori Knowledge. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (2):267-267.
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  3. Richard E. Aquila (1977). The Relationship Between Pure and Empirical Intuition in Kant. Kant-Studien 68 (1-4):275-289.
  4. Richard E. Aquila (1974). Kant's Theory of Concepts. Kant-Studien 65 (1-4):1-19.
  5. N. Avgelis (1991). The Relevance of Duhem and Quine Thesis in the Light of Kant Cognitive Theory. Kant-Studien 82 (3):285-302.
  6. Nikolaos Avgelis (1991). Die Duhem-Quine-These unter dem Geltungsaspekt der erkenntnistheoretischen Fragestellung Kants. Kant-Studien 82 (3):285-302.
  7. Gary Banham (2010). Scepticism, Causation and Cognition. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (3):507-520.
  8. Nathan Bauer (2010). Kant's Subjective Deduction. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (3):433-460.
    In the transcendental deduction, the central argument of the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant seeks to secure the objective validity of our basic categories of thought. He distinguishes objective and subjective sides of this argument. The latter side, the subjective deduction, is normally understood as an investigation of our cognitive faculties. It is identified with Kant’s account of a threefold synthesis involved in our cognition of objects of experience, and it is said to precede and ground Kant’s proof of the (...)
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  9. Lewis White Beck (1976). Is There a Non Sequitur in Kant's Proof of the Causal Principle? Kant-Studien 67 (1-4):385-389.
  10. Ermanno Bencivenga (1987). Kant's Copernican Revolution. Oxford University Press.
    This is a highly original, wide-ranging, and unorthodox discourse on the idea of philosophy contained in Kant's major work, the Critique of Pure Reason. Bencivenga proposes a novel explanation of the Critique's celebrated "obscurity." This great obstacle to reading Kant, Bencivenga argues, has nothing to do with Kant's being a bad writer or with his having anything very complicated to say; rather, it is the natural result of the kind of operation Kant was performing: a universal conceptual revolution. Bencivenga contends (...)
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  11. Jonathan Francis Bennett (1966). Kant's Analytic. London, Cambridge U.P..
  12. Jocelyn Benoist (1998). L'impensé de la Représentation: De Leibniz À Kant. Kant-Studien 89 (3):300-317.
  13. Graham Bird (1996). McDowell's Kant: "Mind and World". [REVIEW] Philosophy 71 (276):219 - 243.
  14. Brady Bowman (2011). A Conceptualist Reply to Hanna's Kantian Non-Conceptualism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (3):417 - 446.
    Hanna proposes a version of non-conceptualism he closely associates with Kant. This paper takes issue with his proposal on two fronts. First, there are reasons to dispute whether any version of non-conceptualism can be rightly attributed to Kant. In addition to pointing out passages that conflict with Hanna's interpretation, I also suggest ways in which the Kant of the Opus Postumum could integrate key insights of non-conceptualism into a basically conceptualist framework. In Part Two of the paper, I turn to (...)
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  15. Gordon G. Brittan Jr (1989). Review: Fernandes, Foundations of Objective Knowledge: The Relations of Popper's Theory of Knowledge to That of Kant. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 56 (3):537-.
  16. G. Anthony Bruno (2011). Gauging Schelling’s Late Return to Kant. Juventas: Zeitschrift für Junge Philosophie 1 (2):118-39.
  17. Jill Vance Buroker (1997). Review: Falkenstein, Kant's Intuitionism: A Commentary on the Transcendental Aesthetic. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 1:162-171.
  18. Howard Caygill (2003). Kant's Apology for Sensibility. In Brian Jacobs & Patrick Kain (eds.), Essays on Kant's Anthropology. Cambridge University Press. 164-193.
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  19. Andrew Chignell (2014). Modal Motivations for Noumenal Ignorance: Knowledge, Cognition, and Coherence. Kant-Studien 105 (4).
    Abstract: My goal in this paper is to show that Kant’s prohibition on certain kinds of knowledge of things-in-themselves is motivated less by his anti-soporific encounter with Hume than by his new view of the distinction between “real” and “logical” modality, a view that developed out of his reflection on the rationalist tradition in which he was trained. In brief: at some point in the 1770’s, Kant came to hold that a necessary condition on knowing a proposition is that one (...)
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  20. Andrew Chignell (2007). Review of Georges Dicker, Kant's Theory of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 116 (2):307-309.
    A review of Georges Dicker's primer on Kant's theoretical philosophy. -/- .
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  21. Predrag Cicovacki (2004). Through the Prism of the Metaphor: A Reflection of the Actuality of Kant's Philosophy. Filozofija I Društvo 25:101-111.
  22. Mark T. Conard (1994). Allison's Reading of Kant's Paradox of Inner Sense. Philosophy Today 38 (3-4):317-325.
  23. Antonopoulos Constantin (2011). Passive Knowledge: How to Make Sense of Kant's A Priori - Or How Not to Be “Too Busily Subsuming”. Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):39.
    Subjectivists, taking the “collapse” of the observation-interpretation contrast much too seriously, are led to imagine that even perceptual knowledge is active. And therefore subject dependent. Turning the tables on this popular trend, I argue that even conceptual knowledge is passive. Kant’s epistemology is conceptual. But if also active, then incoherent. If synthetic a priori truths are to follow upon our mental activity, they were neither true nor, far less, a priori before that activity. “A priori” and “active” are contradictory attributes (...)
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  24. Vincent M. Cooke (1990). Review: Bencivenga, Kant's Copernican Revolution. [REVIEW] International Philosophical Quarterly 30 (1):114-116.
  25. Rodica Croitoru (ed.) (1995). The Critical Philosophy and the Function of Cognition: Proceedings of the Fifth International Symposion [Sic] of the Romanian Kant Society, 19-21 September 1995, Bucharest. [REVIEW] Diogene.
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  26. Paul Crowther (2010). The Kantian Aesthetic: From Knowledge to the Avant-Garde. Oxford University Press.
    This is done by exploring some of his other ideas concerning how critical comparisons inform our cultivation of taste, and art's relation to genius.
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  27. Anna Alice Cutler (1899). The Aesthetical Factors in Kant's Theory of Knowledge. Kant-Studien 2 (1-3).
  28. Daniel O. Dahlstrom (1984). Transzendentale Schemata, Kategorien und Erkenntnisarten. Kant-Studien 75 (1-4):38-54.
  29. Vera Cristina de Andrade Bueno (2008). The Role of Reflection and the Formation of the Concept of the Understanding in the CPR. In Valerio Hrsg V. Rohden, Ricardo Terra & Guido Almeida (eds.), Recht und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants. vol. 2, 121-133.
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  30. Ray H. Dotterer (1938). A Darwinian Postscript to Kant's Metaphysic of Experience. Journal of Philosophy 35 (22):606-610.
  31. Katherine Dunlop (2009). The Unity of Time's Measure: Kant's Reply to Locke. Philosophers' Imprint 9 (4):1-31.
    In a crucial passage of the second-edition Transcendental Deduction, Kant claims that the concept of motion is central to our understanding of change and temporal order. I show that this seemingly idle claim is really integral to the Deduction, understood as a replacement for Locke’s “physiological” epistemology (cf. A86-7/B119). Béatrice Longuenesse has shown that Kant’s notion of distinctively inner receptivity derives from Locke. To explain the a priori application of concepts such as succession to this mode of sensibility, Kant construes (...)
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  32. Stephen Engstrom (2006). Understanding and Sensibility. Inquiry 49 (1):2 – 25.
    Kant holds that the human cognitive power is divided into two "stems", understanding and sensibility. This doctrine has seemed objectionably dualistic to many critics, who see these stems as distinct parts, each able on its own to produce representations, which must somehow interact, determining or constraining one another, in order to secure the fit, requisite for cognition, between concept and intuition. This reading cannot be squared, however, with what Kant actually says about theoretical cognition and the way understanding and sensibility (...)
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  33. Maurice A. Finocchiaro (1984). Hume, Kant E L'Induzione. Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (4):484-485.
  34. Michael Joseph Fletcher (2011). The Cognitive Significance of Kant's Third Critique. Dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbara
    This dissertation aims at forging an archetectonic link between Kant's first and third Critiques within a cognitive-semantic framework. My aim is to show how the major conceptual innovations of Kant’s third Critique can be plausibly understood in terms of the theoretical aims of the first, (Critique of Pure Reason). However, unlike other cognition-oriented approaches to Kant's third Critique, which take the point of contact between the first and third Critique's to be the first Critique's Transcendental Analytic, I link these two (...)
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  35. Ido Geiger (2003). Is the Assumption of a Systematic Whole of Empirical Concepts a Necessary Condition of Knowledge? Kant-Studien 94 (3):273-298.
  36. V. Gerhardt (1987). Copernican Aspects of Kant-on Kaulbach, Friedrich 75th-Birthday. Kant-Studien 78 (2):133-154.
  37. Volker Gerhardt (1987). Kants Koprrnikanische Wende. Kant-Studien 78 (1-4):133-152.
  38. Volker Gerhardt (1979). Kant Und Die Dogmatismusforschung. Kant-Studien 70 (1-4):324-338.
  39. Giann Gigliotti (1995). "Vermögen" e "Kraft": Una rilettura del concetto di "sintesi" nella Critica della ragion pura di Kant. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 50 (2):255-275.
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  40. Ludmila L. Guenova (2010). Review: Hughes, Kant's Aesthetic Epistemology. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 14 (2):155-158.
  41. Ludmila L. Guenova (2007). Review: Guyer, Kant. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 12 (2):184-185.
  42. Robert Hahn (1988). Review: Bencivenga, Kant's Copernican Revolution. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 42 (2):375-376.
  43. Robert Hanna (2011). Kant's Non-Conceptualism, Rogue Objects, and The Gap in the B Deduction. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (3):399 - 415.
    This paper is about the nature of the relationship between (1) the doctrine of Non-Conceptualism about mental content, (2) Kant's Transcendental Idealism, and (3) the Transcendental Deduction of the Pure Concepts of the Understanding, or Categories, in the B (1787) edition of the Critique of Pure Reason, i.e., the B Deduction. Correspondingly, the main thesis of the paper is this: (1) and (2) yield serious problems for (3), yet, in exploring these two serious problems for the B Deduction, we also (...)
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  44. Dietmar H. Heidemann (ed.) (2012). Kant and Non-Conceptual Content. Routledge.
    Conceptualism is the view that cognizers can have mental representations of the world only if they possess the adequate concepts by means of which they can specify what they represent. By contrast, non-conceptualism is the view that mental representations of the world do not necessarily presuppose concepts by means of which the content of these representations can be specified, thus cognizers can have mental representations of the world that are non-conceptual. Consequently, if conceptualism is true then non-conceptualism must be false, (...)
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  45. Dietmar H. Heidemann (2011). Introduction: Kant and Nonconceptual Content – Preliminary Remarks. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (3):319 - 322.
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Volume 19, Issue 3, Page 319-322, July 2011.
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  46. Harald Höffding (1930). Zur stellung der erkenntnistheorie in unserer zeit. Kant-Studien 35 (1-4):480-495.
  47. Fiona Hughes (2010). Kant's Aesthetic Epistemology. Kantian Review 14 (2):155.
  48. Fiona Hughes (2009). Review: Kukla, Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):455-460.
  49. Patrick Kain (2010). Practical Cognition, Intuition, and the Fact of Reason. In Benjamin Lipscomb & James Krueger (eds.), Kant's Moral Metaphysics: God, Freedom, and Immortality. de Gruyter. 211--230.
    Kant’s claims about supersensible objects, and his account of the epistemic status of such claims, remain poorly understood, to the detriment of our understanding of Kant’s metaphysical and epistemological system. In the Critique of Practical Reason, and again in the Critique of Judgment, Kant claims that we have practical cognition (Erkenntnis) and knowledge (Wissen) of the moral law and of our supersensible freedom; that this cognition and knowledge cohere with, yet go beyond the limits of, our theoretical cognition; and that (...)
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  50. Immanuel Kant (2010). Zut Banakanutʻyan Kʻnnadatutʻyun. Hh Gaa.
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1 — 50 / 116