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  1. Daniel Breazeale (2008). Review: Henrich, Between Kant and Hegel. Lectures on German Idealism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 330-331.
  2. Andrew Brook (2006). Kant: A Unified Representational Base for All Consciousness. In Uriah Kriegel & Kenneth Williford (eds.), Self-Representational Approaches to Consciousness. MIT Press. 89-109.
  3. Andrew Brook (1997). Unity of Consciousness and Other Mental Unities. In Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Ablex Press.
    Though there has been a huge resurgence of interest in consciousness in the past decade, little attention has been paid to what the philosopher Immanuel Kant and others call the unity of consciousness. The unity of consciousness takes different forms, as we will see, but the general idea is that each of us is aware of many things in the world at the same time, and often many of one's own mental states and of oneself as their single common subject, (...)
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  4. Richard Brown, Kant, Polysolipsism, and the Real Unity of Experience.
    The question I am interested in revolves around Kant’s notion of the unity of experience. My central claim will be that, apart from the unity of experiencings and the unity of individual substances, there is a third unity: the unity of Experience. I will argue that this third unity can be conceived of as a sort of ‘experiential space’ with the Aesthetic and Categories as dimensions. I call this ‘Euclidean Experience’ to emphasize the idea that individual experiencings have a ‘location’ (...)
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  5. Ralf Busse (2014). Review: Kitcher, Kant's Thinker, Transcendental Apperception: Consciousness or Self-Consciousness? [REVIEW] Kantian Review 19 (1):109-117.
    A core thesis of Kitcher's is that thinking about objects requires awareness of necessary connections between one's object-directed representations and that this is what Kant means by the transcendental unity of apperception. I argue that Kant's main point is the spontaneity or of combination rather than the requirement of reflexive awareness of combination, that Kitcher provides no plausible account of how recognition of representations should be constituted and that in fact Kant himself appears to lack the theoretical resources to clearly (...)
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  6. Quassim Cassam (1989). Kant and Reductionism. Review of Metaphysics 43 (September):72-106.
  7. Steven M. Duncan, Mind, Body, Space, and Time.
    In this essay I explore some of the basic elements of consciousness from a substance dualist point of view, incorporating some elements of Kant's Transcendental Analytic into an overall account of the constitution of consciousness.
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  8. Ellen Fridland & Patricia Kitcher (2009). Empirical Consciousness. In Georg Mohr, Jürgen Stolzenburg & Marcus Willaschek (eds.), Kant-Lexikon. De Gruyter.
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  9. Piero Giordanetti, Riccardo Pozzo & Marco Sgarbi (2012). Kant's Philosophy of the Unconscious. Walter de Gruyter.
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  10. Patrick Grüneberg (2011). Apperzeption und idealrealistische Begründung. In Elena Ficara (ed.), Die Begründung der Philosophie im Deutschen Idealismus. Königshausen & Neumann. 221--230.
    Das Projekt einer Begründung der Philosophie, insbesondere der Metaphysik als Wissenschaft, verbindet sich programmatisch mit dem kritischen Werk Kants und dort mit dem Konzept der transzendentalen Apperzeption. Dieser „höchste Punkt“ bildete seinerseits auch einen der zentralen Anknüpfungspunkte nachfolgender idealistischer Entwürfe und sich daraus entwickelnder Systeme. Die nachkantische Entwicklung wird dabei häufig mit dem Rubrum einer spekulativen Überhöhung des transzendentalen Kritizismus Kants belegt. Dabei ging es Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, Schopenhauer – um nur die prominenten Vertreter zu nennen – in erster Linie (...)
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  11. Aron Gurwitsch (1964). Der Begriff des Bewusstseins bei Kant und Husserl. Kant-Studien 55 (1-4):410-427.
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  12. Robert Hanna (2008). Kantian Non-Conceptualism. Philosophical Studies 137 (1):41 - 64.
    There are perceptual states whose representational content cannot even in principle be conceptual. If that claim is true, then at least some perceptual states have content whose semantic structure and psychological function are essentially distinct from the structure and function of conceptual content. Furthermore the intrinsically “orientable” spatial character of essentially non-conceptual content entails not only that all perceptual states contain non-conceptual content in this essentially distinct sense, but also that consciousness goes all the way down into so-called unconscious or (...)
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  13. Robert Hanna (2000). The Inner and the Outer: Kant's 'Refutation' Reconstructed. Ratio 13 (2):146–174.
  14. D. C. Hoy (1991). A History of Consciousness : From Kant and Hegel to Derrida and Foucault. History of the Human Sciences 4 (2):261-281.
    Would a history of the human sciences seem strange if it featured a chapter on the history of consciousness? An argument for including such a chapter could point out that consciousness is often thought to be essential to what it is to be human. Yet the discipline that makes this.
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  15. Immanuel Kant, On Comprehension and Transcendental Consciousness (German).
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  16. Friedrich Kaulbach (1963). Leibbewusstsein und welterfahrung beim frühen und späten Kant. Kant-Studien 54 (1-4):464-490.
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  17. Pierre Keller (1994). Personal Identity and Kant's Third Person Perspective. Idealistic Studies 24 (2):123-146.
  18. Patricia Kitcher (2014). Replies. Kantian Review 19 (1):149-159.
  19. Eric LaRock (2010). Cognition and Consciousness: Kantian Affinities with Contemporary Vision Research. Kant-Studien 101 (4):445-464.
    After providing a critique of Andreas Engel's neural mechanistic approach to object feature binding (OFB), I develop a Kantian approach to OFB that bears affinity with recent findings in cognitive psychology. I also address the diachronic object unity (DOU) problem and discuss the shortcomings of a purely neural mechanistic approach to this problem. Finally, I motivate a Kantian approach to DOU which suggests that DOU requires the persisting character of the cognizing subject. If plausible, the cognizing subject could make an (...)
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  20. Béatrice Longuenesse (2006). Self-Consciousness and Consciousness of One's Own Body: Variations on a Kantian Theme. Philosophical Topics 34 (1/2):283-309.
  21. William G. Lycan (1995). Consciousness as Internal Monitoring. Philosophical Perspectives 9:1-14.
    Locke put forward the theory of consciousness as "internal Sense" or "reflection"; Kant made it inner sense, by means of which the mind intuits itself or its inner state." On that theory, consciousness is a perception-like second-order representing of our own psychological states events. The term "consciousness," of course, has many distinct uses.
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  22. Jacqueline Marina (2000). Review: Collins, Possible Experience: Understanding Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (1):130-131.
  23. John McDowell (2006). Sensory Consciousness in Kant and Sellars. Philosophical Topics 34 (1/2):311-326.
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  24. Colin McLear (2011). Kant on Animal Consciousness. Philosophers' Imprint 11 (15).
    Kant is often considered to have argued that perceptual awareness of objects in one's environment depends on the subject's possession of conceptual capacities. This conceptualist interpretation raises an immediate problem concerning the nature of perceptual awareness in non-rational, non-concept using animals. In this paper I argue that Kant’s claims concerning animal representation and consciousness do not foreclose the possibility of attributing to animals the capacity for objective perceptual consciousness, and that a non-conceptualist interpretation of Kant’s position concerning perceptual awareness can (...)
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  25. Ralf Meerbote (1984). Review: Farr (Ed), Hume Und Kant Interpretation Und Diskussion. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (3):375-377.
  26. Arthur Melnick (1976). Review: Bennett, Kant's Dialectic. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (2):236-239.
  27. Alf Nyman (1929). Über das „Unbewußte“. Kant-Studien 34 (1-4):151-166.
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  28. Riccardo Pozzo, Piero Giordanetti & Marco Sgarbi (eds.) (2012). Kant's Philosophy of the Unconscious. Walter de Gruyter.
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  29. Dennis Schulting (forthcoming). Transcendental Apperception and Consciousness in Kant's Lectures on Metaphysics. In Robert Clewis (ed.), Reading Kant's Lectures.
    I shall focus on one topic in chiefly the metaphysics lectures that are contemporaneous with Kant’s Critical phase. I look at one particular, though crucial, element, namely transcendental apperception and the notion of ‘consciousness’ and explore to what extent, and in which context, they are featured in the lectures and what changes (or not) from the pre-Critical to the Critical phase of Kant’s lecturing activity. After introducing the theme of apperception and consciousness in Kant and addressing some terminological issues, I (...)
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  30. Dennis Schulting (2012). Non-Apperceptive Consciousness. In Riccardo Pozzo, Piero Giordanetti & Marco Sgarbi (eds.), Kant's Philosophy of the Unconscious. de Gruyter.
    * Note that in this article an inverted comma is used for NER', where it should be an accent, to differentiate it from standard NER. Same with P1', P2' etc. Apparently, the editors of de Gruyter can't understand an author's instruction and just invent their own conventions. -/- In this article, I am interested in answering two, relatively simple, but important questions: (a) Does Kant allow first-order consciousness without second-order consciousness, that is, does he allow for empirical consciousness that is (...)
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  31. Sydney Shoemaker (1983). Self-Consciousness and Synthesis. In Self and Nature in Kant's Philosophy.
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  32. Nicholas F. Stang (2011). Review: Kant's Thinker. [REVIEW] Notes Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  33. Thomas Sturm & Falk Wunderlich (2010). Kant and the Scientific Study of Consciousness. History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):48-71.
    We argue that Kant’s views about consciousness, the mind-body problem, and the status of psychology as a science all differ drastically from the way in which these topics are conjoined in present debates about the prominent idea of a science of consciousness. Kant did never use the concept of consciousness in the now dominant sense of phenomenal qualia; his discussions of the mind-body problem center not on the reducibility of mental properties but of substances; and his views about the possibility (...)
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  34. Ellen Bliss Talbot (1900). The Relation Between Human Consciousness and its Ideal as Conceived by Kant and Fichte. Kant-Studien 4 (1-3):286-310.
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  35. Alan Thomas (1997). Kant, McDowell and the Theory of Consciousness. European Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):283-305.
    This paper examines some of the central arguments of John McDowell's Mind and World, particularly his treatment of the Kantian themes of the spontaneity of thought and of the nature of self-consciousness. It is argued that in so far as McDowell departs from Kant, his position becomes less plausible in three respects. First, the space of reason is identified with the space of responsible and critical freedom in a way that runs together issues about synthesis below the level of concepts (...)
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  36. Fritz-Joachim von Rintelen (1977). Philosophical Idealism in Germany: The Way From Kant to Hegel and the Present. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (1):1-32.
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  37. Eric Watkins (2007). Review: Wunderlich, Kant Und Die Bewußtseinstheorien Des 18. Jahrhunderts. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 61 (2):452-454.
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  38. Terence Wilkerson (1980). Kant on Self-Consciousness. Philosophical Quarterly 30 (118):47-60.
  39. Holly L. Wilson (2008). The Green Kant: Kant's Treatment of Animals. In Paul Pojman Louis Pojman (ed.), in Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application.
    Kant's theory of animals is based on his belief that animals have presentations and consciousness and in this are like human beings. When we abuse animals then we are more likely to abuse human beings. But animals are organic beings that have internal purposiveness and hence are ends for which other things are means. In this limited sense animals have intrinsic value.
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