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  1. Henry E. Allison (2001). Kant's Theory of Taste: A Reading of the Critique of Aesthetic Judgment. Cambridge University Press.
    This book constitutes one of the most important contributions to recent Kant scholarship. In it, one of the pre-eminent interpreters of Kant, Henry Allison, offers a comprehensive, systematic, and philosophically astute account of all aspects of Kant's views on aesthetics. The first part of the book analyses Kant's conception of reflective judgment and its connections with both empirical knowledge and judgments of taste. The second and third parts treat two questions that Allison insists must be kept distinct: the normativity of (...)
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  2. Henry E. Allison (1997). Beauty and Duty in Kant's Critique of Judgement. Kantian Review 1:53-81.
  3. Henry E. Allison (1992). Kant's Antinomy of Teleological Judgment. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (S1):25-42.
  4. Karl Ameriks (2003). Interpreting Kant's Critiques. Oxford University Press.
    Karl Ameriks here collects his most important essays to provide a uniquely detailed and up-to-date analysis of Kant's main arguments in all three major areas of his work: theoretical philosophy (Critique of Pure Reason), practical philosophy (Critique of Practical Reason), and aesthetics (Critique of Judgment). Guiding the volume is Ameriks's belief that one cannot properly understand any one of these Critiques except in the context of the other two. The essays can be read individually, but read together they offer a (...)
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  5. Karl Ameriks (1995). Review: On Paul Guyer's Kant and the Experience of Freedom. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (2):361 - 367.
  6. Karl Ameriks (1983). Kant and the Objectivity of Taste. British Journal of Aesthetics 23 (1):3-17.
  7. Karl Ameriks (1980). Kant and the Claims of Taste. [REVIEW] New Scholasticism 54 (2):241-249.
  8. Richard E. Aquila (2004). Interpreting Kant's Critiques. International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (4):591-593.
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  9. M. Arnold (2003). Harmonious Mood of Enlightened Burghers-The Relation Between Politics and Aesthetics in Immanuel Kant's' Kritik der Urteilskraftl'. Kant-Studien 94 (1):24-50.
  10. Markus Arnold (2003). Die Harmonische Stimmung Aufgeklärter Bürger. Zum Verhältnis von Politik Und Ästhetik in Immanuel Kants Kritik der Urteilskraft. Kant Studien 94 (1):24-50.
    Although Kant had to write his Critique of Judgement with an eye to the Prussian censorship, he nevertheless valued in his aesthetic theory the achievements of the French Revolution. Therefore, the purpose of the article is to analyze the underlying political philosophy of Immanuel Kant's third Critique in the context of the aesthetic theories of his time. The paper presents a brief account of his aesthetic theory (especially of his concepts of "harmony" and "free interplay" between the cognitive faculties) and (...)
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  11. Gary Banham (2000). Kant and the Ends of Aesthetics. Macmillan.
    This is a book focused primarily on reading the *Critique of Judgment* but which takes the central topics of it to be central to understanding the Critical Philosophy generally. It distinguishes types of aesthetics and teleology and in the process suggests an ambitious reconstruction of the landscape of Kant's architectonic.
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  12. Gary Banham, Dennis Schulting & Nigel Hems (eds.) (2012). The Continuum Companion to Kant. Continuum.
    The first genuine and comprehensive English-language handbook to the study of Kant's philosophy, containing sections on Kant's key works, the philosophical and historical contexts of his philosophy, essays on the reception and influence of the Kantian philosophy, a lexical A-Z list of lemmata addressing central themes and concepts of Kant's thought and an extensive English-language bibliography of secondary literature.
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  13. Anne Margaret Baxley (2005). The Practical Significance of Taste in Kant's Critique of Judgment: Love of Natural Beauty as a Mark of Moral Character. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):33–45.
  14. Paul Bommersheim (1919). Der Begriff der organischen Selbstregulation in Kants Kritik der Urteilskraft. Kant-Studien 23 (1-3):209-220.
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  15. Bernard Bourgeois (1993). The Beautiful and the Good According to Kant (Translated by Charles Wolfe). Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 16 (2):359-373.
  16. Reinhard Brandt (2013). Zu Eckart Försters Die 25 Jahre der Philosophie. Eine systematische Rekonstruktion. Kant-Studien 104 (3):367-385.
  17. Eva Brann (2002). Review: Japaridze, The Kantian Subject: Sensus Communis, Mimesis, Work of Mourning. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 56 (2):431-433.
  18. Angela Breitenbach (2013). Beauty in Proofs: Kant on Aesthetics in Mathematics. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):n/a-n/a.
    It is a common thought that mathematics can be not only true but also beautiful, and many of the greatest mathematicians have attached central importance to the aesthetic merit of their theorems, proofs and theories. But how, exactly, should we conceive of the character of beauty in mathematics? In this paper I suggest that Kant's philosophy provides the resources for a compelling answer to this question. Focusing on §62 of the ‘Critique of Aesthetic Judgment’, I argue against the common view (...)
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  19. Angela Breitenbach (2006). Mechanical Explanation of Nature and its Limits in Kant's Critique of Judgment. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (4):694-711.
  20. Harold W. Brogan (2004). Kant's Retrieval of Leibniz. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):271-284.
    Kant’s avowed commitment to the basic principles of Leibniz’s metaphysics is evident throughout the critical project and stated explicitly in the Prize Essay. However, it is not until the Critique of Judgment, wherein Kant recognizes that Judgment operating in its reflective mood can engender synthetic a priori claims, that Kant is fully capable of appropriating the basic tenets of Leibniz’s metaphysics. This paper examines Kant’s treatment of Leibniz from the perspective of the Critique of Judgment. It is argued that from (...)
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  21. Steven Ravett Brown (2004). On the Mechanism of the Generation of Aesthetic Ideas in Kant's Critique of Judgment. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (3):487 – 499.
  22. Paul W. Bruno (2010). Kant's Concept of Genius: Its Origin and Function in the Third Critique. Continuum.
    The first comprehensive study of the roots of the concept of genius in Kant's understanding of nature and his notion of the artist.
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  23. Malcolm Budd (1998). Delight in the Natural World: Kant on the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature Part III: The Sublime in Nature. British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (3):233-250.
  24. John W. Burbidge (1994). Review: Zammito, The Genesis of Kant's Critique of Judgment. Review of Metaphysics 47 (4):851-852.
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  25. Craig Burgess (1989). Kant's Key to the Critique of Taste. Philosophical Quarterly 39 (157):484-492.
  26. Luigi Caranti (2005). Logical Purposiveness and the Principle of Taste. Kant-Studien 96 (3):364-374.
    In both Introductions to the Critique of Judgment Kant seems to identify the a priori principle at the basis of aesthetic judgments with the principle that guides reflective judgment in its cognitive inquiry of nature, i.e. the purposiveness of nature or systematicity. For instance Kant writes.
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  27. H. W. Cassirer (1938/1970). A Commentary on Kant's Critique of Judgment. New York, Barnes & Noble.
  28. Clive Cazeaux (2001). Review: Banham, Kant and the Ends of Aesthetics. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 5:141-147.
  29. Andrew Chignell (2013). Ogilby, Milton, Canary Wine, and the Red Scorpion: Another Look at Kant's Deduction of Taste. In Dina Emundts (ed.), Self, World, and Art. Walter De Gruyter. 261-282.
    An effort to expand and defend aspects of my earlier reading of the Deduction of Taste. The Red Scorpion is just for fun. -/- .
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  30. Andrew Chignell (2006). Beauty as a Symbol of Natural Systematicity. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (4):406-415.
    I examine Kant's claim that a relation of symbolization links judgments of beauty and judgments of ‘systematicity’ in nature (that is, judgments concerning the ordering of natural forms under hierarchies of laws). My aim is to show that the symbolic relation between the two is, for Kant, much closer than many commentators think: it is not only the form but also the objects of some of our judgments of taste that symbolize the systematicity of nature. -/- .
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  31. Andrew Chignell (2004). Review of H.J. Glock (Ed), Strawson and Kant. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (8).
  32. Ted Cohen (1990). An Emendation in Kant's Theory of Taste. Noûs 24 (1):137-145.
  33. Francis X. J. Coleman (1974). The Harmony of Reason: A Study in Kant's Aesthetics. University of Pittsburgh Press.
    Introduction The General Bearings of Kant's Third Critique The Critique of Judgment may be broadly viewed as a work of philosophical diplomacy in which Kant ...
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  34. Timothy M. Costelloe (2003). Hume, Kant, and the "Antinomy of Taste". Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (2):165-185.
  35. Donald W. Crawford (1974). Kant's Aesthetic Theory. [Madison]University of Wisconsin Press.
  36. Andrew Cutrofello (2007). Kant's Debate with Herder About the Philosophical Significance of the Genius of Shakespeare. Philosophy Compass 3 (1):66-82.
  37. Thierry de Duve (2009). Kant's "Free-Play" in the Light of Minimal Art. In Francis Halsall, Julia Jansen & Tony O'Connor (eds.), Rediscovering Aesthetics: Transdisciplinary Voices From Art History, Philosophy, and Art Practice. Stanford University Press.
  38. Charles DeBord (2012). Geist and Communication in Kant's Theory of Aesthetic Ideas. Kantian Review 17 (2):177-190.
    In his Critique of the Power of Judgement, Kant explicates the creation of works of fine art (schöne Kunst) in terms of aesthetic ideas. His analysis of aesthetic ideas claims that they are not concepts (Begriffe) and are therefore not definable or describable in determinate language. Nevertheless, Kant claims that aesthetic ideas are communicable via spirit (Geist), a special mental ability he associates with artistic genius. This paper argues that Kant's notion of Geist is central to his analysis of fine (...)
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  39. A. Degryse (2011). Sensus Communis as a Foundation for Men as Political Beings: Arendt's Reading of Kant's Critique of Judgment. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (3):345-358.
    In the literature on Hannah Arendt’s Lectures on Kant’s Political Philosophy, two sorts of claim have been made by different interpreters. First, there is Beiner’s observation that there is a shift in Arendt’s thoughts on judgment, which has led to the idea that Arendt develops two distinct theories of judgment. The second sort of claim concerns Arendt’s use of Kant’s transcendental principles. At its core, it has led to the critique that Arendt detranscendentalizes — or empiricalizes — Kant, by linking (...)
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  40. Willem A. deVries (1991). The Dialectic of Teleology. Philosophical Topics 19 (2):51-70.
  41. P. Dhillon (2007). Review: Peters, Irony and Singularity: Aesthetic Education From Kant to Levinas. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):221-223.
  42. Jennifer Kirchmyer Dobe (2010). Kant's Common Sense and the Strategy for a Deduction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (1):47-60.
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  43. Robert J. Dostal (1980). Kantian Aesthetics and the Literary Criticism of E. D. Hirsch. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 38 (3):299-305.
  44. Daniel Dumouchel (1994). La découverte de la faculté de juger réfléchissante. Kant-Studien 85 (4):419-442.
  45. Daniel Dumouchel (1994). Review: Zammito, The Genesis of Kant's Critique of Judgment. [REVIEW] Dialogue 33 (01):160-.
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  46. Klaus Düsing (1990). Beauty as the Transition From Nature to Freedom in Kant's Critique of Judgment. Noûs 24 (1):79-92.
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  47. Corey W. Dyck (2009). Review: Lee, The German 'Mittelweg': Garden Theory and Philosophy in the Time of Kant. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 476-477.
  48. Corey W. Dyck (2004). Spirit Without Lines: Kant's Attempt to Reconcile the Genius with Society. Idealistic Studies 34 (2):151-62.
    In the Anthropology, Kant wonders whether the genius or the individual possessing perfected judgment has contributed more to the advance of culture. In the KU, Kant answers this question definitively on the side of those with perfected judgment. Nevertheless, occurring as it does in §50 of the KU, immediately after Kant’s celebration of the genius in §49, this only raises more questions. Kant rejects the genius in favour of the individual of taste as an advancer of culture, yet under what (...)
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  49. C. E. Emmer (2001). The Senses of the Sublime: Possibilities for a Non-Ocular Sublime in Kant's Critique of Judgment. In Volker Gerhardt, Rolf Horstmann & Ralph Schumacher (eds.), Kant und die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des IX. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses, Vol. 3. Walter de Gruyter.
    It might at first seem that the senses (the five traditionally recognized conduits of outer sense) would have very little to contribute to an investigation of Kant's aesthetics. Is not Kant's aesthetic theory based on a relation of the higher cognitive faculties? Much however can be revealed by asking to what degree sight is essential to aesthetic judgment (of beauty and the sublime) as Kant describes it in the 'Critique of Judgment.' Here the sublime receives particular attention.
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  50. Alex Englander (2011). Kant's Aesthetic Theology: Revelation as Symbolisation in the Critical Philosophy. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 53 (3):303-317.
    This essay seeks to ascertain the philosophical status of revelation in Kant's critical philosophy so as to come to a better understanding of the use of Scripture in his religious writings, especially Religion within the Boundaries of Reason Alone . In doing so it remains faithful to Kant's hermeneutic strictures according to which the bible must be expounded according to morality, in the sense of the categorical imperative, and its attendant pure practical postulates. Taking as clues Kant's repeated insistence in (...)
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