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  1. Felix Adler (1902). A Critique of Kant's Ethics. Mind 11 (42):162-195.
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  2. Lucy Allais (2007). Review: Longuenesse, Kant on the Human Standpoint. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 12 (2):164-173.
  3. Henry E. Allison (2001). Ethics, Evil, and Anthropology in Kant: Remarks on Allen Wood's "Kant's Ethical Thought&Quot;. [REVIEW] Ethics 111 (3):594-613.
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  4. Henry E. Allison (1990). Kant's Theory of Freedom. Cambridge University Press.
    In his new book the eminent Kant scholar Henry Allison provides an innovative and comprehensive interpretation of Kant's concept of freedom. The author analyzes the concept and discusses the role it plays in Kant's moral philosophy and psychology. He also considers in full detail the critical literature on the subject from Kant's own time to the present day. In the first part Professor Allison argues that at the center of the Critique of Pure Reason there is the foundation for a (...)
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  5. Henry E. Allison (1971). Kant's Transcendental Humanism. The Monist 55 (2):182-207.
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  6. Matthew C. Altman (2012). Kant and Applied Ethics: The Uses and Limits of Kant's Practical Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Animal suffering and moral character -- Kant's strategic importance for environmental ethics -- Moral and legal arguments for universal health care -- The scope of patient autonomy -- Subjecting ourselves to capital punishment -- Same-sex marriage as a means to mutual respect -- Consent, mail-order brides, and the marriage contract -- Individual maxims and social justice -- The decomposition of the corporate body -- On becoming a person -- Conclusion: emerging from Kant's long shadow.
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  7. Matthew C. Altman (2007). The Decomposition of the Corporate Body: What Kant Cannot Contribute to Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):253 - 266.
    Kant is gaining popularity in business ethics because the categorical imperative rules out actions such as deceptive advertising and exploitative working conditions, both of which treat people merely as means to an end. However, those who apply Kant in this way often hold businesses themselves morally accountable, and this conception of collective responsibility contradicts the kind of moral agency that underlies Kant's ethics. A business has neither inclinations nor the capacity to reason, so it lacks the conditions necessary for constraint (...)
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  8. S. Andersen (2007). Kant, Kissinger, and Other Lutherans: On Ethics and International Relations. Studies in Christian Ethics 20 (1):13-29.
    Many people alive today grew up during the so-called Cold War and even more experienced the fall of the Berlin Wall. The Cold War can be taken as the name of the order of international relations during four decades of the twentieth century. In the following, I want first to comment on the concept of world order and the related one of institution (law). Then I shall deal with the relation between these concepts and various schools in international politics. Next, (...)
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  9. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2011). Privacy, Respect and the Virtues of Reticence in Kant. Kantian Review 15 (2):28-42.
  10. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2006). Kant and the Ethics of Humility: A Story of Dependence, Corruption, and Virtue (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):666-667.
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  11. John J. Ansbro (1975). Kant's Concessions to Particular Interests. New Scholasticism 49 (4):492-502.
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  12. Richard E. Ashcroft (2003). Kant, Mill, Durkheim? Trust and Autonomy in Bioethics and Politics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (2):359-366.
  13. Thomas Auxter (1983). Kant on Moral Practice. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (4):573-575.
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  14. Stefano Bacin (2006). Il Senso Dell'etica: Kant E la Costruzione di Una Teoria Morale. Il Mulino.
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  15. Stefano Bacin & Dieter Schoenecker (2011). Reports and Discussions Thoroughly Destroyed or Read Thoroughly? A Reply to Brandt's Alternative Reading of the Doctrine of Virtue. Kant-Studien 102 (1).
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  16. Ralf M. Bader (2009). Kant and the Categories of Freedom. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (4):799-820.
    This paper provides an account of Kant's categories of freedom, explaining how they fit together and what role they are supposed to play. My interpretation places particular emphasis on the structural features that the table of the categories of freedom shares with the table of judgements and the table of categories laid out by Kant in the Critique of Pure Reason. In this way we can identify two interpretative constraints, namely (i) that the categories falling under each heading must form (...)
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  17. Carla Bagnoli (2012). Morality as Practical Knowledge. Analytic Philosophy 53 (1):61-70.
    In his original essay, The Form of Practical Knowledge, Stephen Engstrom argues for placing Kant’s ethics in the tradition of practical cognitivism. My remarks are intended to highlight the merits of his interpretation in contrast to intuitionism and constructivism, understood as ways of appropriating Kant’s legacy. In particular, I will focus on two issues: first, the special character of practical knowledge—as opposed to theoretical knowledge and craft expertise; and second, the apparent tension between the demands of morality and the requirements (...)
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  18. Sorin Baiasu (2010). Kant and Sartre: Re-Discovering Critical Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction * Kant and Sartre * Methodology * PART I: KANT * Agency * Identity * Freedom * Autonomy * Normativity * Happiness and Virtue * Moral and Political Knowledge * Action-guiding Criteria * PART II: SARTRE AND KANT * Person * The 'I think' * Psychological Rationalism and Empiricism * Synthesis and Analysis * Freedom * Disposition and Project * Determinism and Arbitrariness * Causation and Projection * Morality *. Imperative and Value * Insensitiveness to (...)
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  19. Annette C. Baier (1993). Moralism and Cruelty: Reflections on Hume and Kant. Ethics 103 (3):436-457.
    Both a morality, like Kant's, which relies on wrongdoers' guilt feelings and expectation of punishment, as enforcement for its requirements, and one which, like Hume's, relies on the feelings of shame and expectation of their fellows' contempt which will be felt by those showing lack of the moral virtues, seem to merit the charge that morality is an intrinsically cruel institution. The prospects for a gentle non-punitive morality are explored, and Hume's views found more promising, for this purpose, than Kant's.
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  20. Tom Bailey (2004). Common Sense, Right, and Moral Judgement: Two Recent Additions to the Kant Literature. Res Publica 10 (3):285-300.
  21. Tom Bailey (2002). Kant and Autonomy Conference. Kant-Studien 93 (4):488-490.
  22. Tom Bailey (2001). Review: Wood, Kant's Ethical Thought. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 5:119-128.
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  23. Tom Bailey (2001). Review: Wood, Kant's Ethical Thought & Louden, Kant's Impure Ethics: From Rational Beings to Human Beings. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 5:119-128.
  24. Tom Bailey (2001). Review: Wood, Kant's Ethical Thought & Louden, Kant's Impure Ethics: From Rational Beings to Human Beings. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 5 (1):119-128.
  25. Paula Banerjee & Samir Kumar Das (eds.) (2007/2008). Autonomy: Beyond Kant and Hermeneutics. Anthem Press.
    would suspect him of murdering them and would not spare him. So he too killed himself. Gods were very much disturbed by this sad incident and realized the ...
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  26. Gary Banham (2011). The Antimonies of Pure Practical Libertine Reason. Angelaki 15 (1):13-27.
    In this article I revisit the relationship between Immanuel Kant and the Marquis De Sade, following not Jacques Lacan but Pierre Klossowski. In the process I suggest that Sade's work is marred by a series of antinomies that prevent him from stating a pure practical libertine reason and leave his view purely theoretical.
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  27. Gary Banham (2006). Freedom and Transcendental Idealism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (4):787 – 797.
    Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published following peer-review in British Journal for the History of Philosophy, published by and copyright Routledge.
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  28. Gary Banham (2002). Kant's Critique of Right. Kantian Review 6 (1):35-59.
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  29. Heike Baranzke (2005). Tierethik, Tiernatur und Moralanthropologie im Kontext von § 17, Tugendlehre. Kant-Studien 96 (3):336-363.
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  30. Mike Barber (1999). Philip Blosser: Scheler's Critique of Kant's Ethics. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 32 (1):105-110.
  31. Marcia Baron (2008). Virtue Ethics, Kantian Ethics, and the One Thought Too Many Objection. In Monika Betzler (ed.), Kant's Ethics of Virtues. Walter De Gruyter.
  32. Anne Margaret Baxley (2003). Autocracy and Autonomy. Kant-Studien 94 (1):1-23.
  33. Edward A. Beach (2008). The Postulate of Immortality in Kant: To What Extent is It Culturally Conditioned? Philosophy East and West 58 (4):pp. 492-523.
    Kant's noncognitive argument based on practical reason claims that moral considerations alone suffice to justify the idea of personal immortality as a postulate. Some recent objections are considered here that have charged him with overstepping his own distinction between phenomenon and noumenon. After examining the arguments, Kant is exonerated of having violated his own principles. More troubling, however, is the peculiarity involved in postulating an infinite progression toward a goal whose attainment, by hypothesis, would undermine the very foundations of morality (...)
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  34. Anthony F. Beavers, "What Can A Robot Teach Us About Kantian Ethics?," in Process.
    In this paper, I examine a variety of agents that appear in Kantian ethics in order to determine which would be necessary to make a robot a genuine moral agent. However, building such an agent would require that we structure into a robot’s behavioral repertoire the possibility for immoral behavior, for only then can the moral law, according to Kant, manifest itself as an ought, a prerequisite for being able to hold an agent morally accountable for its actions. Since building (...)
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  35. Anthony F. Beavers, Kantian and Non-Kantian “Agents”.
    We can discern three types of amoral beings in Kant’s ethical philosophy (B1 - B3 below), one kind of moral being (B4), the true moral agent, and one kind of immoral being (B5), for five kinds in all: B1) beings that are driven solely by inclination, such as animals. B2) beings that act solely out of reason and, therefore, duty, such as divine intellects.
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  36. Lewis White Beck (1955). Sir David Ross on Duty and Purpose in Kant. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 16 (1):98-107.
  37. Ermanno Bencivenga (1996). Kant's Sadism. Philosophy and Literature 20 (1):39-46.
  38. Heiner Bielefeldt (2006). Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):229-232.
  39. Graham Bird (2002). Review: Schönfeld, Hinske, Louden, Klemme & Kuehn, Ameriks, Kuehn. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):295 – 306.
  40. Stefan Bird-Pollan (2009). Review: Geiger, The Founding Act of Modern Ethical Life: Hegel's Critique of Kant's Moral and Political Philosophy. Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (4):535-537.
  41. Jürgen-Gerhard Blühdorn (1989). Review: Brakemeier, The Moral Dissolution of the State in Kant's Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy and History 22 (2):131-132.
  42. Jochen Bojanowski (2012). Is Kant a Moral Realist? Kant Yearbook 4 (1).
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  43. Maria Borges (2004). What Can Kant Teach Us About Emotions. Journal of Philosophy 101 (3):140-158.
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  44. Bernard Bourgeois (1993). The Beautiful and the Good According to Kant (Translated by Charles Wolfe). Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 16 (2):359-373.
  45. Joseph M. Boyle Jr (1984). Aquinas, Kant, and Donagan on Moral Principles. New Scholasticism 58 (4):391-408.
  46. Elizabeth Brake (2005). Justice and Virtue in Kant's Account of Marriage. Kantian Review 9 (1):58-94.
    All duties are either duties of right (officia iuris), that is, duties for which external lawgiving is possible, or duties of virtue (officia virtutis s. ethica), for which external lawgiving is not possible. – Duties of virtue cannot be subject to external lawgiving simply because they have to do with an end which (or the having of which) is also a duty. No external lawgiving can bring about someone's setting an end for himself (because this is an internal act of (...)
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  47. Reinhard Brandt (2010). Zwei Konjekturvorschläge zur Tugendlehre, § 9. Kant-Studien 101 (3):377-379.
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  48. Henry Walter Brann (1970). Kant's Ethics and the Problem of Unity of Freedom and Law. Philosophy and History 3 (2):185-187.
  49. I. Brassington (2006). Killing People: What Kant Could Have Said About Suicide and Euthanasia but Did Not. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (10):571-574.
    An agent who takes his own life acts in violation of the moral law, according to Kant; suicide, and, by extension, assisted suicide are therefore wrong. By a similar argument, and with a few important exceptions, killing is wrong; implicitly, then, voluntary euthanasia is also wrong. Kant's conclusions are uncompelling and his argument in these matters is undermined on considering other areas of his thought. Kant, in forbidding suicide and euthanasia, is conflating respect for persons and respect for people, and (...)
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  50. Kimberly Brewer & Andrew Chignell (forthcoming). Review: Anderson-Gold & Muchnik, Kant's Anatomy of Evil. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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